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Playlist: O'Dark 30 episode 20

Compiled By: KUT

Caption: PRX default Playlist image

Almost legal it's Week 20 of O’Dark 30, KUT's exploration of the world of independent radio production. Every Sundays at midnight on KUT 90.5 Austin we present 3 hours of a little bit of everything from the world of independent radio production.

Episode 20 includes My Thoughts on Working for God and Elvis...The Prince of Kosher Gospel...The Hula Lesson...ben franklin death ray...An Addict Named Lady...The Godfather of Ambient Chamber Music...No Brother of Mine...Manufacturing Melodies...KUT's semi-regular Portrait of an Artist--Mo Stoycoff...Holy Land Tour...Waiting on a Furendo

The Prince of Kosher Gospel

From Alex Goldmark | 04:14

First person vignette with music.

Default-piece-image-0 Joshua Nelson, a proud African-American-Jew, explains how he fuses the soul music he loved as a boy with the sometimes dreary liturgical songs of his Jewish faith. He sure can spice up a service, just have a listen to the music he makes.

The Hula Lesson

From Outer Voices | 57:26

In “The Hula Lesson” we join Hawaiian Hula teacher Roselle Bailey and her halau of multicultural women to find out what hula is, what it means to Hawaii, and why so many non-Hawaiians love it.

C0021602_small Hula is more than girls dancing with coconut bras and grass skirts, with strains of Don Ho in the background. In fact, hula is a complete expression of a traditional culture, which uses dancing and singing for teaching social lessons, and for recounting history. In “The Hula Lesson” we join Hawaiian Hula teacher Roselle Bailey and her halau of multicultural women to find out what hula is, what it means to Hawaii, and why so many non-Hawaiians love it.

An Addict Named Lady

From Next Generation Radio | Part of the NPR's Next Generation Radio series | 04:46

A suburban family?s secret struggle with an uncommon addiction comes to light in this personal essay by Laura Mirsch.

Default-piece-image-0 A suburban family?s secret struggle with an uncommon addiction comes to light in this personal essay by Laura Mirsch.

The Godfather of Ambient Chamber Music

From John Diliberto | Part of the Echo Location: Soundings for New Music series | 03:30

Harold Budd started out as a jazz drummer in the 1950s, then became a student of Schoenberg style serialism. Against that backdrop, he revolted the only way he could: making a political statement by creating what he called "pretty music," going against the perceived wisdom of what avant garde music was at the time. With producer John Diliberto, Harold Budd talks about and demonstrates exactly what he means and why he’s a legend among ambient musicians.

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Harold Budd started out as a jazz drummer in the 1950s, then became a student of Schoenberg style serialism. Against that backdrop, he revolted the only way he could: making a political statement by creating what he called "pretty music," going against the perceived wisdom of what avant garde music was at the time. With producer John Diliberto, Harold Budd talks about and demonstrates exactly what he means and why he’s a legend among ambient musicians.

It's part of Echo Location: Soundings for New Music, the weekly digest from Echoes host and Peabody Award winning producer John Diliberto, exploring the latest in modern music with quick hitting interviews, music and commentary. Each edition of Echo Location features a beautifully edited music blend, that's combined with John's thoughtful insights and artists's comments to make a sound-rich journey for listeners. Each episode can stand on its own or be scheduled as a weekly or occasional series.

No Brother of Mine

From Todd Melby | 59:30

“No Brother of Mine” offers an unflinching look at U.S. sex offender policy that reaches beyond the headlines and into the lives of real people. Reported over four years by award-winning independent producers Todd Melby and Diane Richard, this hour-long documentary combines audio-rich storytelling that puts the listener in the scene with expert interviews that lend perspective and propel the narrative forward. It provides a nuanced examination of issues surrounding federal online registration laws, residency restrictions, Romeo and Juliet laws and the growing use of civil commitment.

No_brother_of_mine_image_small In an attempt to protect the public from sexual violence, the U.S. has enacted get-tough laws targeting released sex offenders. Many were inspired by high-profile cases in which children were raped and killed by strangers, a heinous albeit rare crime. Federal law now requires states to register all sex offenders online, including those committed of consensual teen sex and of public urination and indecent exposure. Dozens of states and municipalities have created buffer zones that prevent offenders from living near schools, playgrounds and parks. And about 20 states—including California, New York, Minnesota and Washington—indefinitely confine the worst offenders to mental hospitals.

Proponents contend that these laws make society safer. Opponents say they’re often ineffective and violate civil liberties.

Since 2006, award-winning producers Diane Richard and Todd Melby interviewed leading experts and victims’ advocates about the impact of these laws. They've also spent time getting to know four Minnesotans convicted of sex crimes, in prison and since their release. In many ways, these men represent the complexity of the issue. Their crimes span a spectrum of sexual violence. All are felons. Each completed a sex offender treatment program.

These men’s stories put a candid human face on the highly politicized issue of sex crimes, the damage they cause and some of their common roots. Together, the documentary provides a nuanced examination of issues surrounding online registration laws, residency restrictions, Romeo and Juliet laws and the growing use of civil commitment.

Produced with dual narrators, “No Brother of Mine” combines audio-rich storytelling that puts the listener in the scene with expert interviews to propel the narrative forward. The result is a probing look from many different perspectives at a nation grappling with how to handle the sensational yet banal reality of sexual violence and at the struggles released offenders face in a society that no longer wants them.

Manufacturing Melodies

From Zak Rosen | 06:22

A sound-rich profile of Frank Pahl, a Wyandotte, Michigan based musician and toy instrument builder.

Img_1682_small Frank Pahl grew up in a Wyandotte, MI.  A town outside of Detroit, where most people work in a factory, making cars or something having to do with them.   But Pahl defied his family's expectations of him, and has for the past 20-years tinkered with toys and tools for the sheer enjoyment of the process, rather than a pre-determined end result, and he's been able to etch a living out of his sound experiments.  He's specifiaclly interested in the sound of youth and childhood, and has been collecting toy instrments for years and years. 

Holy Land Tour

From Jake Warga | 13:27

Never before aired! PRX exclusive!
A personal tour through the Holy Land, looking at how the conflict started and what it's like today between Jerusalem and Bethlehem...between birth and re-birth.

Also a slideshow:
http://hearingvoices.com/news/2009/12/holy-land-tour/
or
http://vimeo.com/8037836

Playing
Holy Land Tour
From
Jake Warga

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A narrated audio-rich trip through the holy land exploring the modern state of Christmas.  Between Jerusalem and Bethlehem, between Easter and Christmas, there is a modern and yet ancient wall.  In my travels I explore the origins of the conflict, all the way back to Abraham:

 

"...The name “Isaac” means “He Laughs”  His laughter and blood becomes David’s...A lineage dripping with laughter, but blood is mixed with tears.  Ishmael, the name, means “He Weeps”  The brother of Isaac, the brother of Laughter, weeps to this day...

...In Jerusalem, religions compete to see which can get you up the earliest. Call to prayers from loud speakers in minarets try to beat the roosters. Then come wake-up bells from churches.  Not even an Atheist can over-sleep in the holy land. "

Video:

http://hearingvoices.com/news/2009/12/holy-land-tour/
or
http://vimeo.com/8037836