%s1 / %s2

Playlist: O'Dark 30 episode 59 (2-07)

Compiled By: KUT

Caption: PRX default Playlist image

KUT's O’Dark 30 is at it again as it brings you the best from the world of independent radio production. Every Sunday at midnight on Austin's KUT 90.5 and also at 4pm on digital KUT2 we present 3 hours of a little bit of everything from the world of independent radio production.

Episode 59 (2-07) includes Portrait of the Artist: Jason Neulander...Global Guru Radio: Reading Russian Fortunes...Peace Talks Radio: Martin Luther King Jr's Path to Non-Violence...How I Learned to Tell Time...How to Lose 50 Pounds of Old Age...A Radio Rorschach Test...Clever Apes: The March of Time...Stuck

Jason Neulander

From KUT | Part of the Portrait of an Artist-a semi-regular series series | 10:09

Jason Neulander is the director and creator of The Intergalactic Nemesis. He sat down with producer Rebecca McInroy to discuss his inspirations as an artist and the life and history of the production of the Intergalactic Nemesis.

Playing
Jason Neulander
From
KUT

Jason_neulander_small Jason Neulander is the director and creator of The Intergalactic Nemesis. He sat down with producer Rebecca McInroy to discuss his inspirations as an artist and the life and history of the production of the Intergalactic Nemesis.

Reading Russian Fortunes

From Rachel Louise Snyder | Part of the Global Guru Radio series | 03:03

You're Russian and your son's about to get married. But what if the girl can't be trusted? What if your son's marriage is doomed? Or worse, what if he leaves home and you never see him again? These are just the sort of scenarios that drives hundreds of thousands of Russians to fortune tellers each year. And, surprisingly, fortune tellers hold a place high up in the hierarchy of Russian society. Listen here for more on this phenomenon...

Guru_logo1_small

The Global Guru is a weekly public radio show that seeks to celebrate global culture, particularly in countries where Americans have either single narrative story lines, like Afghanistan (war), Thailand (sex tourism), Rwanda, (genocide), or perhaps no story lines at all, like East Timor, Moldova, Malta, Lesotho, etc. Engaging and rich in sound, the 3:00 interstitial seeks to enrich our collective understanding of the vastness of human experience. Presenting station is WAMU in Washington, DC and sponsored by American University in DC. Some of our favorite past shows include: How do Cambodians predict the harvest each year? How did Tanzania become the capitol of barbershops? How and why does Thailand categorize food? What is Iceland’s most feared culinary delight? How do you track a Tasmanian devil? What are the hidden messages in Zulu beadwork?

Peace Talks Radio: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Path To Nonviolence (59:00/54:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 59:01

Martin Luther King Jr.'s journey to a philosophy of nonviolence and his lasting legacy as a peace proponent is recalled in interviews with his daughter, the late Yolanda King, and one of King's top colleagues in the civil rights movement, Dr. Dorothy Cotton. This program is also available in a 29:00 version at PRX.

Yolandaking_small IMPORTANT: Please have your local announcer read the following script before and after this show. "The following (preceding) program, featuring an interview with Yolanda King, the daughter of the late Martin Luther King Jr., was recorded in 2004. Yolanda King died, at the age of 51, May 15, 2007." PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Two women with very close ties to Martin Luther King Jr. reflect on how King developed into one of the great moral and political philosophers of the 20th century and how his philosophies might still guide the world through troubled times today. Dr. Dorothy Cotton was the highest ranking female in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, founded by Dr. King. From 1960 to 1972 Dr. Cotton was the educational director for SCLC and worked very closely with Dr. King. The late Yolanda King was the eldest daughter of Dr. King. She was an internationally known motivational speaker and actress whose personal mission in life was to inspire positive social change and world peace. Ms. King died in May of 2007 at the age of 51. Ms. King and Dr. Cotton were interviewed separately in 2004 by phone by show host Carol Boss. The entire program includes about 15 minutes of excerpts from talks by Dr. King, along with music by U2 ("Pride in The Name of Love") and 1960's recordings by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Freedom Singers. Newscast Compatible (but airing a newscast will pre-empt a compelling King speech clip). Program is split into two parts that can be run as separate half hours. The two 29 minute parts can stand alone and are separated by a minute long music bed. A 29:00 version of the program is also available on PRX: http://www.prx.org/piece/3124

How I Learned To Tell Time

From KUFM - Montana Public Radio | Part of the Notes From the Huntley Project series | 57:48

The inability to tell time has forced six-year-old Jaybird to become an outlaw and to face a darkness that did not exist to him before now.

Hilttt_small

In Notes from the Huntley Project , Jay Kettering's comedic and thought-provoking radio series, a middle-aged man reflects on a childhood spent in small-town space-time, where love meets mysticism and adventure meets imagination.

Episode I:  My Dad and Pre-Socratic Thought

Episode II:   How I Learned to Tell Time  

In this play, comedy and tragedy ride double. You see, the inability to tell time has forced six-year-old Jaybird to become an outlaw and to face a darkness that did not exist to him before now. After stabbing his first-grade teacher in the thigh with the big hand of Clock Man, he is living life on the run. The loud librarian is sympathetic to his plight, but ultimately exposes his hideout and Jaybird must pay for his crime of ignorance. Luckily, Jaybird's trusted friend and mentor, George Georgie, is there to help him navigate through the strange landscape that is eastern Montana — where playgrounds are the size of small towns and foot-eating devils and floorboard angels reveal secrets of life and death. Only one thing is for sure in this odyssey to understand the ticking of the clock--time is on their side.

How I Learned To Tell Time was written by Jay Kettering
Directed by Teresa Waldorf

Performed by:

David Mills-Low:   Narrator, Jaybird
Rebecca Schaffer:  Mrs. Andsum, Miss Glowtier, Mom
Will Tilton: Stewart Pie, random kid, George Georgie, Rodger, Charlie Sheriff
Jessica Adam: Miss Flip, Nurse, Mrs. Bomb
Aaron Roos: Joe Shramski, Greg Bomb, Bill, Dad, Highway Patrolman

Recorded by Beth Anne Austein in the studios of Montana Public Radio

Edited and produced by Chérie Newman

Episode III:  The Church of Pancakes

How To Lose 50 Pounds of Old Age

From The humble Farmer | 01:27

People who say they feel old are probably overweight

Humbleoats_small eat two apples, drink two quarts of water and walk five miles every day

A Radio Rorschach Test

From Aaron Henkin | 13:30

An exploration of how six radio 'guinea pigs' react to a series of sonic inkblots...

Inkblot_small I was inspired to put this piece together after interviewing Baltimore experimental musician John Berndt about his band Geodesic Gnome. Their stuff is so abstract, it seemed like a great opportunity to gather together a really random sampling of volunteer test-subjects and to 'administer' the songs to them scientifically as possible, in the tradition of the Rorschach test. I'm guessing a psychologist would have a field day listening to the results of this radio experiment. It turned up some pretty cool mental images and some pretty humorous moments. Now clear your mind, and prepare to answer honestly...

Clever Apes: The March of Time

From WBEZ | Part of the WBEZ's Clever Apes series | 13:00

How our brains age, and why some people manage to cheat death and stay sharp.

P1060185_small

We’ve always assumed that cognitive decline was just the cost of a long life. But some people manage to sail into old age without ever paying a price in mental sharpness. These “super-agers” may have a lot to teach us about how the brain slows down and how dementia and senility work. They might even reveal whether there are protective factors against illnesses like Alzheimer’s Disease.

On the latest installment of Clever Apes, we dive into the science of super-aging. And we get to know one super-ager in particular – a 93-year-old renaissance man who happens to be a leading brain scientist. His twin passions give him a unique perspective on aging: he’s a world authority on a brain signaling network that is, among other things, implicated in Alzheimer’s; and for almost 40 years, he’s been fixated on the question of self-consciousness, and the nature of the I.

Stuck

From Radio Rookies | 08:55

Kaddeem Wright enjoys reading philosophy and arguing with his friends about history and politics. With his smarts and innate curiosity about the world, Kaddeem seems like a kid who should thrive in school, but he's not. Instead he feels unmotivated and rarely does his homework.

Playing
Stuck
From
Radio Rookies

Kaddeemwright_small Kaddeem Wright enjoys reading philosophy and arguing with his friends about history and politics. With his smarts and innate curiosity about the world, Kaddeem seems like a kid who should thrive in school, but he's not. Instead he feels unmotivated and rarely does his homework. He scrapes by with a C average, something that frustrates him and his mom. Like a lot of kids, especially young black males in New York City, Kaddeem is not reaching his potential. He wants to know to why he and so many of his friends are barely getting by, uninspired by school or thoughts of the future.