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Playlist: O'Dark 30 episode 105 (3-01)

Compiled By: KUT

Caption: PRX default Playlist image

KUT's O’Dark 30 moves headlong into its third season with more of the very best from the world of independent radio production this week. Every Sunday at midnight on Austin's KUT 90.5 and also at 4pm on digital KUT2 we present 3 hours of a little bit of everything from the world of independent radio production.

Episode 105 (3-01) includes The Penguin Goes A Courtin'...Brian's Story...Jay Allison...The Mikie Show #29, Glenn 3...The Wisdom of Jay Thunderbolt (Censored Version)...The Five Percent Rule...Bonjour Chanson, Series 9, Episode 45...People Without A Nation...Christmas Portraits of a House Divided...

The Penguin Goes A Courtin'

From Jonathan Goldstein | 03:55

Two of literature's great umbrella travelers-- The Penguin and Mary Poppins-- have dinner together in Merry Old England.

Default-piece-image-1 Before The Penguin became best known as Batman's archenemy in Gotham City, he was a boozing dandy who lived in London. The Penguin's friends all thought that if he just met the right woman, he might be inclined to settle down and avert the disastrous, alcoholic path his life appeared to be taking. His friends held a dinner party at which he was introduced to a woman they believed would make a perfect mate for him-- a singing nanny named Poppins, who, like him, traveled about by umbrella. Everyone thought the two eccentrics would get on most splendidly. Everyone, of course, was wrong.

Brian's Story

From Jake Warga | 22:52

My friend Brian and I sat on a bench one night and talked about why he tried to kill himself. He eventually succeeded.
(My first Radio story, 2001)

Playing
Brian's Story
From
Jake Warga

Brian2_small My friend Brian and I sat on a bench one night and talked about why he tried to kill himself. He eventually succeeded. (My first Radio story, 2001)

Jay Allison

From Jenny Attiyeh | 28:00

The man who put the "public" back in public media

Playing
Jay Allison
From
Jenny Attiyeh

Tnjayallison_small Jay Allison has egalitarian instincts. He's a maverick, who's made it his mission to put the "public" back into public media. As an independent producer of stellar public radio - and television - Jay's been able to work outside the system, and then change the system. Take "This I Believe" for example. Jay's the man behind this series of audio essays, written and performed by a wide variety of Americans, ranging from the well-known to the unknown. As Jay says in this ThoughtCast interview, their sincerity and lack of skepticism make them almost the antithesis of "journalism" -- and yet there they are, on NPR!

The Mikie Show #29, Glenn Three

From Michael Carroll | Part of the The Mikie Show series | 28:03

Join us as we once again chat with our friend psychotherapist Dr. Glenn Berger. This time we discuss the world’s most popular topic: love. Yes, it does make the world go 'round. But why, and how do we find it? And when we do find it, how do we keep at it? And how come there are so many question marks in this description? Why not tune in and find out? Let’s see, what else? I know an unexpected guest will drop by, they always do, don’t they? Plus there’s a quiz, some news and Mikie talks about, um, waving? I think it’s a good show and it cleans without messy build up, what more could you want?

Heart_small

Join us as we once again chat with our friend psychotherapist Dr. Glenn Berger. This time we discuss the world’s most popular topic: love. Yes, it does make the world go ‘round. But why, and how do we find it? And when we do find it, how do we keep at it? And how come there are so many question marks in this description? Why not tune in and find out? Let’s see, what else? I know an unexpected guest will drop by, they always do, don’t they? Plus there’s a quiz, some news and Mikie talks about, um,waving? I think it’s a good show and it cleans without messy build up, what more could you want?

The Wisdom of Jay Thunderbolt (CENSORED VERSION)

From Love + Radio | Part of the Love + Radio - (CENSORED VERSIONS) series | 28:02

Jay Thunderbolt's business card is a little mysterious. It reads, "Thunderbolt - Party Naked" and gives a phone number.
(Uncensored version available here: http://www.prx.org/pieces/61863)

Thunderbolt200_medium_small Original music composed and arranged by Brendan Baker. Produced and edited by Nick van der Kolk, Brendan Baker, and Nick Williams. Special thanks to Noah Morrison, John Notarianni, and Beth Taylor.

An extra-clean edit is also avalible under Additional Files.

Bonjour Chanson, Series 9, Episode 45

From Charles Spira | Part of the Bonjour Chanson Series 9 series | 29:05

An exciting mixture of French chansons that will lift your spirits. Extraordinary French rap, blues, a tender ballad. A wonderful compilation of great artists and songs with English commentary.

Lyon_flower_statue_small From a song written and performed by a star of the movie "Inglorious Basterds" to a blues song rendered in English by an American artist, this episode is a treat for those who love or are intrigued by French Chanson.  We introduce six artists with one of their songs.  The commentary is in English, so youi'll have the best of both worlds.  Here is the lineup:
Melanie Laurent, (France), En t'Attendant
MC Solaar, (France), Bling Bling
Anne Sylvestre, (France), Les Gens Qui Doutent
Raphael, (France), Bar de l'Hotel
Carole Fredericks, (France, USA), Tu es La
Francis Cabrel, (France), Je t'aime a Mourir

People Without A Nation

From Charles McGuigan | 09:58

There are eleven tribes of Indians who call Virginia home, among them the Chickahominy. And though they all now enjoy state recognition, the federal government doesn’t believe they exist.

Chickahominy__tribe__medium_small In Virginia, there are eleven Indian tribes, some several thousand people in all. Yet the United States doesn’t believe they exist. The seeds of this denial were planted in the early years of the last century by one man with a narrow vision and unrestrained power. Charles McGuigan recently visited the Indian Council Grounds in Charles City, Virginia and heard the story from one of the assistant chiefs of the Chickahominy tribe.

Christmas Portraits of a House Divided

From Andrew Parsons | Part of the 12 Days of Christmas series | 06:54

Interviews with two sisters document a stark difference in their Christmas memories growing up.

Logoprxmas_small Last year I took the time to interview a handful of my friends and family about their holiday memories to cut into CD for a mass Christmas present. As I listened to the accounts of holiday memories and disasters, two interviews in particular struck me. It was the contrast between my Aunt’s recollection of Christmas with her family and my mother’s. You see, my mom is from a family of 8 children in rural western Pennsylvania, outside of Pittsburgh. Linda was the oldest child, 5 years older than my mom. So she remembers the first Christmases of a new family, before it ballooned into 8 children and before tragedy struck. It was a pleasant Christmas and the descrption is almost magical.

Fast forward more than a decade. My mom was just ten when her mother died of cancer, which made Linda 15. Christmases were different without a mother figure and ever since my grandfather became an alcoholic after her death. Linda wasn’t around too many years after that, but my mother was. She remembers Christmases a little differently. She remembers her father becoming absolutely drunk and forcing the large family to travel miles in the snow on the way to midnight mass, stumbling and freezing the whole way through the woods.

These two stories show a house divided by two recollections of Christmas from two very different times. One the reflection of the care that goes into a new family’s preparation for Christmas and another the reflection of the same family’s fall from those lovely memories. The fact that these are the Christmases that each sibling chooses to remember is a reflection of their age difference and experience in the family. Though it should be noted that according to each one’s story, the other should have been able to remember at least one Christmas as described by the other sister.

Maybe it’s just also a reflection of the fact that memory and it’s preservation is less a matter of what you remember, but what you choose to remember.

Snowballs at Midnight Mass

From Andrew Witmer | 04:33

Essayist Jonathan Malesic learns something new about Christmas after attending one of the only midnight Catholic masses ever to end in a snowball fight.

Malesic_small In this light-hearted and thoughtful piece, Jonathan Malesic describes how his ideas about celebrating Christmas were changed by a snowball fight after midnight mass in Buffalo, New York. This is an original piece.