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Playlist: O'Dark 30 episode 06

Compiled By: KUT

 Credit: KUT.org
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O'Dark 30 is an exploration of the world of independent radio production. A new program on KUT 90.5 Austin that airs Sunday nights at midnight. Every week we look forward to presenting 3 hours of a little bit of everything from the world of independent radio production We’ve got one rule… if it’s good, we’re gonna try to bring it to Austin.

Episode 6 pieces include Stick Poke Scrape Dump...Matching Outfits Not Included...MLK Jr's Path to non-Violence from Peace Talks Radio...A Shortcut to the Mountaintop...Mexican Christmas Tradition Celebrated Amid Poverty and Drug War...The Day My Mother's Head Exploded...Is It Just Me?...Sun Tunnels...Women's College Cheerleaders Challenge Stereotype...The Messrs. Craft...That Job Sucked Anyway...My Favorite Things.
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O'Dark 30 is an exploration of the world of independent radio production. A new program on KUT 90.5 Austin that airs Sunday nights at midnight. Every week we look forward to presenting 3 hours of a little bit of everything from the world of independent radio production We’ve got one rule… if it’s good, we’re gonna try to bring it to Austin. Episode 6 pieces include Stick Poke Scrape Dump...Matching Outfits Not Included...MLK Jr's Path to non-Violence from Peace Talks Radio...A Shortcut to the Mountaintop...Mexican Christmas Tradition Celebrated Amid Poverty and Drug War...The Day My Mother's Head Exploded...Is It Just Me?...Sun Tunnels...Women's College Cheerleaders Challenge... Show full description

Stick Poke Scrape Dump

From Bill Palladino | 06:29

A rhythmic essay describing the producer's first job cleaning up a drive-in theater.

Whitestonedrivein_small An essay/poem assignment from the Radio Anyway program titled: Dead End Jobs. My first job was at the Bronx Whitestone Drive-in Movie Theater, picking up trash the day after each showing. The theme picks up on allusions to water. It uses a piece of music from the Kronos Quartet as its rhythmic foundation for the prose that follows. It is essay-like, in that it leans towards frilly prose. Just my way of having fun with the meter of language while telling a story. Radio Anyway is a locally produced program in Traverse City, Michigan. It is a half-hour in length and usually includes four six minute, independently produced, pieces. Please keep in mind this piece was produced with for this program.

Matching Outfits Not Included

From Hillary Frank | 10:24

Two elderly sisters, who are not twins, dress exactly the same, eat all the same food, and go everywhere together.

Default-piece-image-0 Honey and Dusty are sisters in their seventies. Ever since they were teenagers, Honey and Dusty have been dressing exactly alike, from wigs to glasses to purses. In every way possible, the sisters seem to have preserved the relationship they had as girls. Still, like any grown couple that's lived together successfully, what they fear most is that one will die before the other. This piece first aired on This American Life.

Martin Luther King Jr.'s Path To Nonviolence -29:00 Version (Peace Talks Radio Series)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:01

Martin Luther King Jr.'s journey to a philosophy of nonviolence and his lasting legacy as a peace proponent is recalled in interviews with his daughter, Yolanda King, and one of King's top colleagues in the civil rights movement, Dr. Dorothy Cotton. This program is also available in a 59:00 version available at PRX.

Yolandaking_small IMPORTANT: Please have your local announcer read the following script before and after this show. "The following (preceding) program, featuring an interview with Yolanda King, the daughter of the late Martin Luther King Jr., was recorded in 2004. Yolanda King died, at the age of 51, May 15, 2007." PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Two women with very close ties to Martin Luther King Jr. reflect on how King developed into one of the great moral and political philosophers of the 20th century and how his philosophies might still guide the world through troubled times today. Dr. Dorothy Cotton was the highest ranking female in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, founded by Dr. King. From 1960 to 1972 Dr. Cotton was the educational director for SCLC and worked very closely with Dr. King. The late Yolanda King was the eldest daughter of Dr. King. She was an internationally known motivational speaker and actress whose personal mission in life was to inspire positive social change and world peace. Ms. King died in May of 2007 at the age of 51. Ms. King and Dr. Cotton were interviewed separately in 2004 by phone by show host Carol Boss.  A newscast compatible 59 minute version of this program is available at PRX: http://www.prx.org/piece/3123 Promos for this program are also contained at the site for the 59:00 version.

A Shortcut To The Mountaintop

From Peter Bochan | Part of the Shortcuts series | 29:27

Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute Mix

Martin_luther_king__jr A tribute to Martin Luther King Jr, featuring many of his most famous speeches mixed with music from Stevie Wonder, The Freedom Singers, Jimmy Cliff, James Taylor, Nina Simone, Bill Lee/Branford Marsalis, Moodswings,U2 and more---

Mexican Christmas Tradition Celebrated Amid Poverty and Drug War

From Monica Ortiz | 04:12

The marginalized community of Lomas de Poleo in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico celebrated their tenth anniversary posada this year. A posada is a Mexican Christmas tradition celebrated all over the country.

Matachine_small Host Introduction (Not included in the mixed piece):
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The Mexican border city of Juarez has suffered two of the most violent years in its history. Despite the drug related-mayhem, the impoverished neighborhood of Lomas de Poleo –located in the desert outskirts of the city--still managed to organize their yearly Christmas fiesta. Reporter Monica Ortiz Uribe attended the celebration, which is known as a posada.



The Day My Mother's Head Exploded

From Hannah Palin | 19:59

It is the story of the brain aneurysm that almost killed my mother in 1987 and how she became a completely different person from the mother of my childhood.

Default-piece-image-1 On August 20, 1987 my mother had a brain aneurysm when she was only forty-six years old. She survived. Most people don't. I've come to refer to this life-changing event as "The Day My Mother's Head Exploded." The proper, socially conscious mother I grew up with died that day, and was replaced by an entirely different person. It turns out that my new mother adores Wendy's hamburgers, likes to wear Groucho Marx glasses in public places and will perform a spirited rendition of "Goodbye My Coney Island Baby" at the drop of a hat. When my mother's head exploded, she had a chance to start all over again and she took it. I didn't really get my wacky new mom and spent years grieving for the mother of my childhood. But when I was finally able to realize that my mother's eccentricities are really heart-felt affirmations of survival I was able to move on and to appreciate the person who exists in the here and now. I've wanted to tell her story, and my own, too, for years now, but have struggled with form and structure. I'm a writer and producer with a background in theatre and documentary filmmaking. Despite all of the tools at my disposal, I just couldn't get it right. Then, on a whim, I borrowed a mini-disc recorder and did an extended interview with my mother when she was on a visit to Seattle. A year later, Jack Straw Productions awarded me some studio time and the services of Scott Bartlett, an extraordinarily gifted and patient engineer, who helped me navigate a host of technical landmines so that I could find the true path to this particular story. "The Day My Mother's Head Exploded" was first presented to the public as part of the Jack Straw Artist Support Program in April 2003. When the piece was over, my mother joined me on stage where we performed her signature song, "Goodbye My Coney Island Baby." And yes, we wore Groucho Marx Glasses.

Is It Just Me?

From Voices of Youth - Moab | 03:31

Stereotypes about skaters

Default-piece-image-2 This is my first piece and I wrote this piece because I was tired of being labeled a no good punk skater who was always in trouble. This piece talks about the stereotypes associated with skating, and some fellow skaters' opinions on them.

Sun Tunnels

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Scott Carrier stories series | 07:39

Marking the solstice with concrete desert art.

Scsuntunnel_small Sun Tunnels in the Utah Desert: The summer solstice, the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere and the official beginning of summer, is makred by an obscure art installation called the Sun Tunnels in a very remote part of the Utah desert. Concrete drain pipes -- are aligned to channel the sun's rays at precise celestial moments.

Women's College Cheerleaders Challenge Stereotype

From Karen Brown | 05:02

A new cheerleading squad at one of the country's pre-eminent women's colleges -- alma mater of Gloria Steinem and Betty Friedan -- is raising eyebrows with its short skirts and perky attitudes.

Sq3_small The Smith College "Spirit Squad" set off a controversy this fall when 70s and 80s-era alumnae learned that their historically feminist, academically-rigorous school would be taking part in the most stereotypically "unfeminist" type of activity. But the cheerleaders on the squad insist that they're simply refusing to obey traditional boundaries of what is feminist. What's more feminist than cheering for women athletes?

That Job Sucked Anyway

From Megan Hall | 34:06

Stories, anecdotes, and fantastical rants about the woes of working life

Job1_small On July 23rd, Megan Hall, Sue Ellen Kroll and Tom Van Buskirk presented a live mix of interview snippets with musical interludes.  What followed was an audio odyssey of the state with the second highest unemployment rate in the country.