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Playlist: O'Dark 30 episode 173 (4-17)

Compiled By: KUT

Caption: PRX default Playlist image

KUT's O’Dark 30 is now in semi-prime time with more of the very best from the world of independent radio production. Sunday nights at 10 on Austin's KUT 90.5 we present 3 hours of a wee bit of everything from the world of independent radio production.

Episode 173 (4-17) includes Dear diary...KUT's Delta State with Spike Gillespie "Treeple"...Life Stories - Families: Women and Children...Charles Mingus...My Name is Lydia Foy...A Child Hidden in East Flanders in 1942...The Mikie Show #46, Wake...Biloxi Stabbing

Dear diary

From Cristina Marras | 03:11

Being forced to write a daily diary by your own mother is not fun, no matter where you live.

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A young boy records his daily routine in a diary, noting how much he hates writing it and how happy he is to be going to visit his relatives. It's only at the very end that an unexpected twist reveals the reality of it all.

 

Life Stories - Families: Women and Children

From Jay Allison | Part of the The Life Stories Collection series | 59:04

Three stories of young women - Concerning Breakfast, The Trapeze Artist, Alone Like a Stone. One hour of a five-hour series of first-person portraits.

Lifestories These are public radio stories made over many years, by producer Jay Allison -- working together with Christina Egloff, and friends, colleagues, neighbors, strangers and whoever would take the loan of one of his tape recorders. They are are stories about life as we find it, and record it. HOST: Alex Chadwick In this hour: Concerning Breakfast (22:58) A story about eating, and not eating. About family, love, hospitals, beautiful music, and anorexia. Produced with Annie Cheney. My Daughter the Trapeze Artist (7:30) A father interviews his daughter while she's hanging upside-down on her trapeze, about to fly away. There must be a metaphor in there somewhere. Produced with Jon Carroll Alone Like a Stone in the New World (25:35) They're thinking about tearing down Margy?s grandmother?s house. Come to think of it, they seem to want to tear everything down. What we choose to save, and why. Produced with Margy Rochlin

Charles Mingus

From KUT | Part of the KUTX Liner Notes series | 02:38

Charles Mingus is considered one of the most creative and original voices in American jazz. Uniquely sensitive to the plight of the dispossessed, he challenged his musical ensembles to be improvisatory acts of collective inspiration — responding to the matters of the moment.

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Charles Mingus
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Mingus_small The music that Mingus wrote was rooted in standard musical forms and grounded in the blues, yet he challenged these conventions with new perspectives and unorthodox juxtapositions, encouraging his bands to do the same. In this short feature Rabbi Neil Blumofe examines at how interpretation of these forms in performance might bring about the transformation of a musician, a listener, and potentially, the world.

My Name is Lydia Foy

From Documentary on One - RTE, Ireland | 36:53

Lydia Foy was born in 1947 and registered as a baby boy. When she realised her true identity, as a woman, she discovered something missing - a birth certificate. This is the story of a woman who has fought for her identity in life and in the legal system.

0004b591-474_small Lydia Foy was born in 1947 and registered as a baby boy. When she realised her true identity, as a woman, she discovered something missing - a birth certificate. This is the story of a woman who has fought for her identity in life and in the legal system.

A Child Hidden in East-Flanders in 1942

From Charles Spira | 21:09

When the Germans started the deportation of Jews in Antwerp, Belgium in 1942, Charles Spira was 4 years old. This is the story how Charles, his mother and sister survived the occupation.

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When the Germans started the deportation of Jews in Antwerp, Belgium in 1942, Charles Spira was 4 years old.  This is a witness account of the narrow escape of his mother, his sister and himself and their life hiding in the home of the baker of a small village in East-Flanders.
We learn about the constant danger of discovery in the village of Nazareth, about daily life until the liberation of the village two years later by Canadian soldiers.  The story does not end there.  After their return to liberated Antwerp,  V1 and V2 rockets targeted at the harbor, caused numerous casualties among civilians and once more  Charles, his mother Fanny and sister Annette had to flee from Antwerp.

 

The Mikie Show #46, Wake

From Michael Carroll | Part of the The Mikie Show series | 28:02

It’s episode forty-six! Fresh on the heels of episode forty-five. Maybe not so fresh, it’s been a while, but what matters is, you’re here!
Yes, this episode we speak with Wake Wheeler, a Shamanic practitioner. He practices and teaches the traditions of the Q’ero, indigenous people of Peru. Truly a gentle soul. And I was surprised to find out how important textiles are to their beliefs and traditions.
There’s more things: We’re going to have a quiz (bet you never guessed that), and some news, and Mikie gets stuck under an underpass, who knows what can happen under an underpass… I see another guest drops by, but they’re not yet quite in focus. If you click the play arrow, though, everything will become clear, so go ahead, see for yourself!

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It’s episode forty-six! Fresh on the heels of episode forty-five. Maybe not so fresh, it’s been a while, but what matters is, you’re here!

Yes, this episode we speak with Wake Wheeler, a Shamanic practitioner. He practices and teaches the traditions of the Q’ero, indigenous people of Peru. Truly a gentle soul. And I was surprised to find out how important textiles are to their beliefs and traditions.

There’s more things: We’re going to have a quiz (bet you never guessed that), and some news, and Mikie gets stuck under an underpass, who knows what can happen under an underpass… I see another guest drops by, but they’re not yet quite in focus. If you click the play arrow, though, everything will become clear, so go ahead, see for yourself!

Biloxi Stabbing

From Jeff Forester & Jeremy Lerman | 15:28

Biloxi, Mississippi, 3 a.m. The attackers advanced from the dark.

The violence was sudden, intense. Forester's cheek, nose and two ribs were broken. A fourteen-inch knife gash exposed kidney and lung.

Then they were gone into the night.

Swaying, bloody foam bubbling from his back, he struggled to breathe--at that moment Forester was transformed from victim to master of his life.

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Biloxi, Mississippi.  October, 1995.  Minneapolis artists Wayne and Jeff were in Biloxi painting tromp l'oeil murals and frescos on a casino barge.

After a night of partying, as they were leaving the Hurricane nightclub, a neo-Nazi said to Wayne--a white guy with dreadlocks--"If you're going to look like a nigger, then we'll treat you like a nigger."  The swastika-tattooed skinhead slammed his fist into Wayne’s face.  Another blow came in from the side to Jeff's face. Nine others (all of them white) joined in against the two. 

Wayne fell.  The crowd began to kick and stomp him.  As Jeff tried to pull Wayne up, he felt a searing pain in his back, turned to see the neo-Nazi holding the handle of a buck knife.  He held only the handle; no blade.  The blade's full length had broken off in Jeff's back.  With blows careening in from all angles, no room to maneuver, Jeff fought for his life, head-butting the Nazi’s face until the Nazi dropped to the ground, jumped up and ran.  The others followed.  And just like that, it was over.

Jeff said to the bouncer: "I just got stabbed."  The bouncer, who had not left his stool during the fight, replied: "I know you did.  I know you did, buddy."  He grinned at Forester, but offered no help.  Jeff rolled up his shirt and stuffed it in his back so he could breathe.

Jeff woke up in a dilapidated Hospital.  Miraculously, the knife had missed all vital organs, only having nicked a lung.

Jeff and Wayne would only get the sum of their payment upon completion of the painting job--and Hurricane Opal was heading towards Biloxi, heading towards their riverboat jobsite.  They needed that pay to make it home.  After a day of rest in a motel bed, Jeff resumed work--except he couldn't bend over.  The solution: Jeff taped a paintbrush to the end of a yardstick, dipped the brush without bending his body, painted a few strokes, then dipped again, never bending, and painted on.

They drove to the airport in torrential rain.  (Opal did not ultimately make landfall in Biloxi, although Katrina would throw the "Grand Casino" riverboat six blocks inland.)

Back in Minneapolis, Jeff's body began to heal, but emotionally he fell apart. Post-traumatic stress took hold.  He grew increasingly isolated and depressed. His drinking escalated to clinical proportions.  Anger replaced all other emotions. His relationships, business and life unraveled.  He considered ending the life he had just fought so hard to preserve--his own.

It was a Vietnam vet that led him back, and by the end of the journey, Forester would view the stabbing as a moment of grace, a gift.  This is the story of how one man emerged from senseless, hate-fueled violence to a place of redemption. "I am not the person I was," says Forester, "and I am grateful for that."

In a time of ethnic and racial tensions being played out on a global scale, with scores of Afghan and Iraq veterans succumbing to post-traumatic stress, Forester's story serves as a roadmap to others.  Jeff Forester, father and award-winning writer, tells survivors, "You are not alone; you are not a victim; you have an opportunity at greater happiness and serenity than ever before."