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Playlist: O'Dark 30 episode 119 (3-15)

Compiled By: KUT

Caption: PRX default Playlist image

KUT's O’Dark 30 closes in on the Ides of March with more of the very best from the world of independent radio production this week. Every Sunday at midnight on Austin's KUT 90.5 and also at 4pm on digital KUT2 we present 3 hours of a little bit of everything from the world of independent radio production.

Episode 119 (3-15) includes Two Little Girls Explain The Worst Haircut Ever...Illegal Mail...#12- 99% Invisible...Mighty Wurlitzer Organ and silent movie soundtracks...Garden of Eden (A Postcard from Mexico)...Deported: Weazel's Diary...The Mikie Show #32, Priscilla...The Decisions Project -1- Pressing Charges...What Are You?...The Friendly Rabid Squirrel...Bonjour Chanson Series 10, Episode 48...The Legend of Knockmany

Two Little Girls Explain The Worst Haircut Ever

From Jeff Cohen | 02:57

My five year old cut off my three year old's hair. A few weeks later, I decided to interview them and get their explanations. Here's what they told me.

Imag0242a_small Happy to say that this little radio story has taken another life. In the summer of 2014, it will be a children's book released by HarperCollins Children's Books. Take a look!

Illegal Mail

From Blunt Youth Radio Project | Part of the Incarcerated Youth Speak Out series | 08:47

For students locked up in Maine's Long Creek Youth Development Center passing notes is a crime... and an art form. Jacorey investigates.

4078111846_32cfb04460_m_small For students locked up in Maine's Long Creek Youth Development Center passing notes to one another - what the facility calls "illegal mail" - is a crime, but it's also one of the most commonly committed crimes at Long Creek.  Jacorey delves into the culture of illegal mail, from the enforcers to the self-defined King of Illegal Mail. 

#12 - 99% Invisible

From HowSound | Part of the HowSound series | 19:14

99% Invisible is my new favorite podcast. A little bit RadioLab, a touch of This American Life, and a lot of Roman Mars, the producer. There’s everything to like about the podcast.

99invisible-logo-square_small

99% Invisible is my new favorite podcast. A little bit RadioLab, a touch of This American Life, and a lot of Roman Mars, the producer. There’s everything to like about the podcast.

Each episode makes visible some “in-broad-daylight-but-you-never-noticed-it-until-this-podcast” element of architecture and design. If you’re not curious about the built environment — which is just about everything from escalators to the pyramids  — then listen to this instead.

On this edition of HowSound, Roman talks about a bit about the design of the podcast and podcasting writ large.

I should mention, too, Roman’s other major audio endeavor, Public Radio Remix. It’s a montage of ear candy produced for PRX — documentaries, sound art, features, podcasts, aural treasures…. Roman’s the DJ, if you will.

Happy listening!

Rob

Mighty Wurlitzer Organ and silent move soundtracks

From Jake Warga | 04:45

A portrait of the Mighty Wurlitzer organ in Seattle's Paramount theatre--one of the last three remaining organs of its kind to reside in its original environment, played by acclaimed organist Jim Riggs.

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Not since 1927 has a silent film won an academy award, but this weekend, a silent film called “The Artist” is competing for best picture. 

Back in the early days of cinema, it was movies studios that built theaters to showcase their films. The Paramount Theatre in Seattle, Washington is one such movie palace that still remains and stands proud in refurbished glory. Inside is one of the country’s few working Mighty Wurlitzer Organs built when the theater was constructed, also in 1927. Jim Riggs, Wurlitzer organist, performed recently in Seattle for a screening of the 1927 feature film "Wings" which was the first film, and the only silent film, until maybe this weekend, to win  a the top Academy Award.

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http://stgpresents.org/wurlitzer/

Garden of Eden (A Postcard from Mexico)

From Jay Allison | Part of the Stories From Carmen series | 05:57

Carmen Delzell with another lovely meditation on the mysteries of travel and her semi-magical, melancholy life in Mexico. Like all these pieces it was recorded in the late 1990s, but it holds up just fine.

(note: this piece has a one-minute tail of guitar music. You can fade it out.)

Phpthumb_generated_thumbnailjpg_small Carmen Delzell with another lovely meditation on the mysteries of travel and her semi-magical, melancholy life in Mexico. Like all these pieces it was recorded in the late 1990s, but it holds up just fine. (note: this piece has a one-minute tail of guitar music. You can fade it out.)

Deported: Weazel's Diary

From Radio Diaries | 31:42

A 26-year-old Los Angeles resident gets deported to his parents' home country of El Salvador, which he has not seen since age five.

Weasel_001_square_small When he was five years old, William - aka Weazel - moved from El Salvador to Los Angeles, California, with his family. For more than two decades, he lived a pretty typical American childhood in Los Angeles. Until he got in trouble with the police. Under current US law, legal residents who are convicted of crimes may be deported to the country of their birth. That's what happened to Weazel. This audio diary follows Weazel as he struggles to reinvent his life - and relearn Spanish - alone, in a new country. "I've been banished from the U.S. you know. Like they used to do in the medieval days. They used to ban fools. I went to kindergarten in L.A., elementary school, junior high school, high school. I grew up singing, you know, My Country 'Tis of Thee, that little song America the Beautiful, pledging allegiance to the flag. I grew up with all that. You know? And here they are, 27 years later, kicking me out." -- Weazel Broadcast on This American Life 05/99

The Mikie Show #32, Priscilla

From Michael Carroll | Part of the The Mikie Show series | 28:03

Episode thirty-two is just below, right behind that little arrow. It’s hiding there. If you don’t believe me, go ahead, click that little arrow and see what happens. What did I tell you, ha! Now you can sit back and join us as we delve into the world of ghostwriting. Yes, ghostwriter Priscilla Barton joins us to discuss her craft. She’s currently working on a non-fiction mystery, so we’ve taken up that theme and played a bit mysteriously ourselves. Yes, there are clues to the sound quiz hidden in the show (meaning I say something pertinent to the quiz answer or may even say the actual answer in some passing way). So you might want to keep your ears open start to finish, not that you would ever miss a golden word anyway. Also, we have another guest come by, there’s news about the future and Mikie lets you in on a private moment! This is the kind of thing we wait for our whole lives! Was that too strong? Okay, we wait for these moments at least a day or two! Thanks for tuning in!

Scribe_small

Episode thirty-two is just below, right behind that little arrow. It’s hiding there. If you don’t believe me, go ahead, click that little arrow and see what happens. What did I tell you, ha! Now you can sit back and join us as we delve into the world of ghostwriting. Yes, ghostwriter Priscilla Barton joins us to discuss her craft. She’s currently working on a non-fiction mystery, so we’ve taken up that theme and played a bit mysteriously ourselves. Yes, there are clues to the sound quiz hidden in the show (meaning I say something pertinent to the quiz answer or may even say the actual answer in some passing way). So you might want to keep your ears open start to finish, not that you would ever miss a golden word anyway. Also, we have another guest come by, there’s news about the future and Mikie lets you in on a private moment. This is the kind of thing we wait for our whole lives! Was that too strong? Okay, we wait for these moments at least a day or two!  Thanks for tuning in!

The Decisions Project - 1 - Pressing Charges

From Aengus Anderson | Part of the The Decisions Project series | 06:28

During the summer of 2010, producer Aengus Anderson rode his motorcycle around North America and interviewed 220 people about the hardest decisions they had ever made. A cross-section of their conversations are presented here as The Decisions Project. In this conversation, a woman talks about deciding to press charges against her daughter for theft.

Decisionsproject_mp3_small During the summer of 2010, producer Aengus Anderson rode his motorcycle around North America and interviewed 220 people about the hardest decisions they had ever made.  A cross-section of their conversations are presented here as The Decisions Project.

Learn more at www.thedecisionsproject.com

What are you?

From Paul Flahive | Part of the Arctic Entries series | 11:06

Loren Anderson questions why he didn't know the answer to "What are you?" Trying to understand why his cultural identity wasn't a part of his life.

Default-piece-image-2 Loren Anderson questions why he didn't know the answer to "What are you?" Trying to understand why his cultural identity wasn't a part of his life.

The Friendly Rabid Squirrel

From JP Davidson | 06:41

When I was 9 years old, a rabid squirrel bit me.

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It was a beautiful spring day. I was playing outside when I spotted something furry next to the house, and went over to investigate. It turned out to be a fluffy little squirrel. I'd never seen a squirrel act so tame before – he’d come right up to me. He was moving slower than I'd ever seen a squirrel move before, like he was drunk or something. This made him seem more... approachable. I figured this was my lucky day - If I played my cards right, I'd get to pet this little guy. We might even become best friends. He could live in my pocket.

He scurried up to me as if he wanted something. I thought he might be thirsty, so I ran inside as quick as I could to get him something. I came back out with a pie plate of water, and he was still there, acting as squirrely as ever. I lowered the water to the ground and he came up to investigate. At this point, I figured we'd developed a bit of a rapport - so I extended my hand tentatively to pet him.

He bit me, hard, and ran away. Our budding friendship was dashed, and I was bleeding a little. 

My dad’s a doctor, but he wasn’t worried when I told him about the bite. Squirrels weren’t known to carry rabies. All that changed when, a couple of weeks later, the news reported a few confirmed cases of rabid in squirrels nearby. That freaked my parents out – rabies can be fatal once symptoms appear – and those can develop months after exposure. So my dad whisked me away to the clinic where he worked to have one of his colleagues stick me with the vaccine.

I didn’t enjoy the two needles the doctor gave me – but when he said there were “only” SIX MORE to go – I decided I’d had enough. Instinct took over and I scurried to safety under the doctor's desk. Pretty soon my dad’s colleague – a usually dignified physician – was on his hands and knees trying to get me out, while I cowered like a caged animal. My dad looked on awkwardly, not knowing what to do. Dad had dealt with difficult kids in the clinic before, but I think he was pretty embarrassed to see his own son acting out like that.
Eventually – a nurse heard the commotion and came to the rescue. She produced a full-sized (not fun-sized) Kit-Kat chocolate bar, and lured me out of my burrow. It worked, but damn those next six shots hurt.

That day I learned that squirrels, doctors, and sweet delicious chocolate have something in common. Betrayal. 

Bonjour Chanson Series 10, Episode 48.

From Charles Spira | Part of the Bonjour Chanson Series 10 series | 25:08

We introduce Six French Singer/Songwriters in English and invite you to listen when they interpret one of their songs in French. It may be habit-forming.

Amiens_small Open a bottle of wine, lean back and relax.  Six very diverse artists will bring you the best of contemporary French Popular music.  We'll introduce them in English with one of their songs.  You are entering a different world.
In this episode we'lll hear:
Jean-Jacques Goldman, (France), Tournent les Violons
Agnes Bihl, (France), Attention Fragile
Albin de Simone. (France), De Bonne Humeur
Zaz, (France), La Fee
Yannick Noah, (France), Destination Ailleurs
Claire Denamur, (France), 34 septembre