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Playlist: O'Dark 30 episode 124 (3-20)

Compiled By: KUT

Caption: PRX default Playlist image

KUT's O’Dark 30 fights through the Tax Day blues to bring you more of the very best from the world of independent radio production this week. Every Sunday at midnight on Austin's KUT 90.5 and also at 4pm on digital KUT2 we present 3 hours of a little bit of everything from the world of independent radio production.

Episode 124 (3-20) includes #4 Behind The Comedy: Thirty Years of Duck's Breath Mystery Theater/A Look Back...#11 The Longest, Shortest Time...As I Am: Asians in America...Stories of Dedication and Passion...To My Little Brother

#4 Behind the Comedy: Thirty Years of Duck's Breath Mystery Theatre/A Look Back

From Duck Spots | Part of the Behind the Comedy: Thirty Years of Duck's Breath Mystery Theatre series | 57:24

Our Holiday Show! Thanksgiving and Christmas mainly. Though we make every day a holiday. Also a mini-tribute to England, and Randee of the Redwoods. More.

Default-piece-image-2 One of five hour long shows celebrating 30 years of Duck's Breath Mystery Theatre, this episode, The Sweet Stink of Success, is hosted by Bill Allard and Merle Kessler (from the Ducks). It features Million Dollar Sculpture Wrestling, the film noir Santa Claus, Underwater World of Jacques Cocteau, Get to Know Your Thanksgiving Dinner, Ask Dr. Science, and more. Music by Andy Paley (Composer: SpongeBob SquarePants), and our announcer has an English accent!

#11 - The Longest, Shortest Time

From HowSound | Part of the HowSound series | 24:46

Creative inspiration, podcasting, and motherhood with Hillary Frank.

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Hillary Frank launched a decade-long career in radio with an answering machine as a tape recorder.

In college, Hillary was dead-set on getting a story on This American Life. The fact that she had no radio experience what-so-ever didn’t matter. She just made a story and sent it in. But, instead of a professional mic and recorder, she used the built in mic on an answering machine and then edited on a boom box cassette player.

Really.

Eventually, Hillary worked at This American Life and half-a-dozen other radio programs. Now, she’s harnessed the creative spark again, this time with a podcast — The Longest, Shortest Time.

On this HowSound, Hillary talks about inspiration, podcasting, and motherhood.

Cheers,

Rob

As I Am: Asians In America

From Nathan Kupel | 57:00

The As I Am pilot features reports, analyses, and commentary on social, political, cultural and artistic topics seldom heard on traditional public radio broadcasts. Hosted by the award-winning journalist, author and scholar Helen Zia, public radio audiences will hear unique voices and perspectives on a variety of issues from across the country.

Helenzia_small About the Pilot The As I Am pilot features reports, analyses, and commentary on social, political, cultural and artistic topics seldom heard on traditional public radio broadcasts. Hosted by the award-winning journalist, author and scholar Helen Zia, public radio audiences will hear unique voices and perspectives on a variety of issues from across the country. The As I Am Pilot has also just recently received an award from the American Women in Radio and Television in the "Outstanding Special Category," for a segment that was previously aired on American Public Media's Weekend America. The Pilot features up and coming author Min Jin Lee as she discusses her new book Free Food for Millionaires with Boston College's Professor Min Hyoung Song. As I Am's Paul Niwa reveals the effects of gentrification on Boston's Chinatown through one man's battle against his landlord's rent increase. American Public Media's Angela Kim's journey from California to the Midwest reminds us that no matter where we may move we are often searching for something, anything, to remind us of where we came from. Nationally recognized slam poet Regie Cabico performs a piece that challenges the notion that we can be easily defined by a census box. Known for his cookbooks and popular television show Yan Can Cook, Chef Martin Yan steps out of the kitchen to talk with the award-winning broadcast journalist Sydnie Kohara. A group of UMass Boston students' trip to the Gulf Coast is chronicled as they discuss rebuilding the Vietnamese American communities ravaged by Hurricane Katrina. And International Studies Professor at Trinity College Vijay Prashad comments on why his ideal home isn't in the present, it is in the future. You can hear these stories and more, on As I Am: Asians In America. Musical consideration for the pilot has been provided by Boston Progress Radio a community-based online radio station and blog focusing on independent Asian American music and art. For more information on Boston Progress Radio please visit their website: www.bprlive.org. Bio for Helen Zia Helen Zia is an award-winning journalist and a Contributing Editor to Ms. Magazine, where she was formerly Executive Editor. She is the author of Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People (2000), which President Bill Clinton quoted at White House ceremonies and was a finalist for the prestigious Kiriyama Prize. She is coauthor, with Wen Ho Lee, of My Country Versus Me (2002). Their book reveals what happened to the Los Alamos scientist who was falsely accused in unsubstantiated front page stories of being a spy for China in the worst case since the Rosenbergs. Her articles, essays and reviews have appeared in numerous publications, including Ms., New York Times, Washington Post, The Nation, Essence, The Advocate, Curve, and OUT. Ms. Zia testified before the US Commission on Civil Rights 1997 about inaccurate and biased news coverage of Asian Americans during the spotlight on campaign finance. She traveled to Beijing in 1995 to cover the UN Fourth World Congress on Women as part of a journalists of color delegation. Her work on the Asian American landmark civil rights case of anti-Asian violence is documented in the Academy Award nominated film, "Who Killed Vincent Chin?" A second generation Chinese American, Helen Zia received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from the Law School of the City University of New York and was the first recipient of the Suzanne Ahn Journalism Award for Civil Rights and Social Justice. She is an Expert Fellow with University of Southern California's Justice and Journalism program of the Annenberg School of Journalism, and is a Writer-in-Residence at New York University's APA Institute. She is a graduate of Princeton University and a member of the university's first graduating class of women. She quit medical school after completing two years, then went to work as a construction laborer, an autoworker, and a community organizer, after which she discovered her life's work as a writer.