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Playlist: Alabama

Compiled By: Eva Breneman

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Alabama Alabama

From Anton Foek | 11:10

One {....} of a captain. Kathy Broughton grew up in Birmingham Alabama but soon learned fishing from

P1000329_small Kathy Broughton has been fishing ever since she can remember. When the tight time was there, she turned a professional fisher and the only - if not one of the few - captain in these parts of the U.S. of America. She gets up every morning at 3.30 am but to compensate she also gets to bed early and spends the whole day on water near the Gulf of Mexico. Her greatest wish is to pass on her knowledge and experience on to younger generations as preservation of the seas riches is very precious to her. As a lonely rock she stands out in an all mens world. Listen to her uniique story.

The Blind Boys of Alabama

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

The Blind Boys of Alabama and Dr. Darrell Rigel, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, The Blind Boys of Alabama are the backbone of southern gospel music. That is because they have been singing hit songs since 1949. The original members attended the Alabama Institute for the Negro Blind in Talladega and began singing in local churches. Although they’ve had many opportunities to cross over into popular music over the years. The Blind Boys have always passed those opportunities by to continue their prolific career in gospel. Jimmy Carter, the only remaining original member says, “He was always going to sing gospel.”

Then, Dr. Darrell Rigel, clinical professor of Dermatology at New York University Medical Center talks about new sunscreen regulations and the dangers of various skin cancers. To help prevent Melanoma, sunscreens and sun blocks now need to protect from UV rays A and B, they need to print on the bottle how long they will last before becoming ineffective, and they need to specify whether they protect from dangerous broad-spectrum rays. Dr. Rigel also recommends using at least SPF 30 sunscreen that is water resistant for at least 80 minutes.

Blind Boys of Alabama and Dr. Darrell Rigel, this week on Prime Time Radio.

PPW 01: Alabama

From Nick Szuberla | Part of the Prison Poetry Workshop Podcasts series | 13:53

Sit in any prison classroom or recreation room and ask: How many writers are in the room? How many people are writing rhymes or poems? Carefully-folded pieces of paper come out of pockets – words written in tightly stylized hand-writing. As we listen to these poems we realize they hold a deep significance to our understanding of American culture and its tradition of democratic arts.

Avatars-000040687783-pr3r20-t500x500_small The Prison Poetry Workshop traveled to Alabama and met the Alabama Prison Arts and Education Project, a part of Auburn University, which serves prisons across the state. APAEP believes it's important for the adult prison population to gain an education and access to the arts. Join us as we listen in on their writing workshop.

Alabama Prison Arts and Education Project

Learn more about the Prison Poetry Workshop radio series.

Dropping Out: Part One

From The National Center for Media Engagement | Part of the American Graduate series | 02:51

Welcome to Woodlawn High School in Birmingham, Alabama, a Title I "dropout factory" striving to improve its success rates.

Apt_logo_small Produced by Woodlawn High School Jeff Meadows' Journalism Class

This I Believe - Kendra Jones

From This I Believe | Part of the This I Believe series | 03:27

Kendra Jones, an English teacher in Alabama, believes in toughness, steeliness and even meanness.

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HOST:  Many of our This I Believe essays have extolled the virtues of kindness, gentleness, and tolerance.  Not today's.  It reflects a belief in the harder stuff.  It comes from Kendra Jones, a teacher at Wallace Community College in Selma, Alabama.

JONES: I believe in toughness, steeliness and even meanness.

I learned these traits from my father.  Toughness came first.  I am the first-born and the son he never had.  I’m the one he took to the gym, the one who could run faster than the boys, the one who played all day with a broken collarbone.  I’m the one who thought my daddy was the toughest man around—and I wanted to be just like him.  He never missed a day of school, worked as a dishwasher to pay his college tuition, and toiled as an accountant by day and attended law school at night.

My dad also taught me steeliness, an unwillingness to surrender.  Steeliness kept me from being raped once.  I fought my attacker.  I left an imprint of my phone on his face.  I memorized details of his face and clothing.  Determined to keep other women from being violated, I identified him, testified against him and made sure he went to jail.

Sometimes even toughness and steeliness aren’t enough.  I also believe in meanness. 

I am not a large woman; petite, in fact.  I cannot command respect with my presence and stature.  As a community college English instructor in a tough town, I teach people who aren’t always eager to learn.  I’m the mean teacher.  I like to push students harder than they want to be pushed.  Some of them don’t like me at the time, but they usually end up appreciating me later on.  “Hate me now, love me later,” is my motto. 

I’m even mean with myself.  Sometimes it’s meanness that gets me out of bed in the morning, like after a night drinking too much.  I’m not nice to myself—I don’t give myself permission to stay home.  Some of my best teaching days have been the result of my refusal to make others suffer for my poor self-discipline.  Meanness with myself keeps me accountable.

That tough and steely will my father gave me helps me bear the loss of him.  I watched him die of cancer, but he never gave up on wanting to live.  Perhaps it would have been easier on both him and the family had he given in to death, had he not fought to the absolute last breath.  Although I do not have him in my life anymore, I got to see him as himself to the very end of his.  I understand the poet Dylan Thomas, who pleads with his own father to “rage, rage against the dying of the light.”

Women are usually encouraged to be gentle.  But when life has tested me the most, I believe it’s my toughness, my steeliness and even my meanness that get me through.

 

Freeman Hrabowski on Birmingham Bombing

From New Visions, New Voices | Part of the Moments of the Movement series | 03:29

The bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham was a turning point in the Civil Rights Movement. But for Freeman Hrabowski, now president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, it was personal. The Birmingham native was part of the movement as a child, and knew Cynthia Wesley, one of the four girls killed that morning. Here, he explains how the events of that day and the aftermath not only forever changed him, but Birmingham as well, and eventually, the country.

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The bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham was a turning point in the Civil Rights Movement. But for Freeman Hrabowski, now president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, it was personal. The Birmingham native was part of the movement as a child, and knew Cynthia Wesley, one of the four girls killed that morning. Here, he explains how the events of that day and the aftermath not only forever changed him, but Birmingham as well, and eventually, the country.

:30 PROMO

AS WE LOOK AHEAD TO THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON, (YOUR STATION HERE) PRESENTS THE NEW SERIES, MOMENTS OF THE MOVEMENT. THESE VIGNETTES FEATURE INTERVIEWS WITH KEY CIVIL RIGHTS LEADERS AND PARTICIPANTS, MANY OF WHOM, UNTIL NOW, HAVE NEVER BEEN GIVEN THE SPOTLIGHT THEY DESERVE.  TUNE IN TO HEAR THESE INSPIRING PERSONAL STORIES. BROUGHT TO YOU BY NEW VISIONS, NEW VOICES; THE SMITHSONIAN MUSEUM OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE; AND (YOUR STATION HERE).

 

StoryCorps Griot: Clayton Sherrod

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:13

Clayton Sherrod looks back to 1964, when at 19 years old he became executive chef at an all--white country club in Birmingham, Alabama.

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As a teenager, Clayton Sherrod worked at an all-white country club in Birmingham, Alabama.

In 1964, when he was just 19, Sherrod became the club’s first African-American executive chef.

At StoryCorps, he remembered how he came to run his first kitchen.