%s1 / %s2

Playlist: New Orleans

Compiled By: Eva Breneman

Caption: PRX default Playlist image
No text

PPW 10: New Orleans

From Nick Szuberla | Part of the Prison Poetry Workshop Podcasts series | 07:31

Join the Prison Poetry Workshop as we travel to New Orleans and join a group of prison poets who are taking on Walt Whitman.

Intake-center-photo_400_242_small Join the Prison Poetry Workshop as we travel to New Orleans and join a group of prison poets who are taking on Walt Whitman.

Back to New Orleans

From Howard Burchette | Part of the Jazz Time series | 55:35

Legendary musicians from New Orleans are featured in this program doing what they do best. This program contains the best of the New Orleans sound from its brass bands to modern jazz musicians. All of the artists performing today are children of New Orleans, the birthplace of Jazz.

Pres_jazz_band_small

Back to New Orleans:

New Orleans known as the Crescent City is a music hub. It has always been a potpourri of cultures and music. That mixture continues today as you will experience with native New Orleans legendary artists like Kermit Ruffins, Lloyd Price, Dr. John, The Preservation Hall Jazz Band, The Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Jason Marsalis, Trombone Shorty, Zigaboo Modeliete, Christian Scott, Darvell Crawford , and the Soul Rebels . When you listen to it, you will experience it as we go Back to New Orleans .

Finding a Voice in New Orleans

From Learning Matters | Part of the Paul Vallas in New Orleans series | 05:06

Deputy Superintendent Michael Haggen discusses how new programs are helping students in New Orleans' alternative schools develop a voice.

Michael_haggen_pic_small Deputy Superintendent Michael Haggen discusses how new programs are helping students in New Orleans' alternative schools develop a voice.

How 'America's Toughest High School' Turned Itself Around

From Learning Matters | Part of the Paul Vallas in New Orleans series | 08:18

Walter L. Cohen H.S. in New Orleans, LA was once called one of the most dangerous schools in America. Not anymore.

354_small Two years ago, students at Cohen roamed the halls instead of attending class, and the vast majority of its students didn’t graduate. The situation was so bad that National Geographic made a documentary about Cohen, calling it America's Toughest High School. This year, Cohen graduated 93% of its seniors, students serve as “ambassadors” to the school and study to become doctors and nurses. What is Cohen doing right?

Life Through a New Lens

From Learning Matters | Part of the Paul Vallas in New Orleans series | 03:57

One actor from the cast of the new HBO television show "Treme" is doing more than just acting.

Ameer_baraka_w_jermaine_morgan_and_david_quinn_small Treme cast member Ameer Baraka does more than act on set.  He also mentors 16-year-olds David Quinn and Jermaine Morgan, who, like Baraka, ran into trouble with the law early.  Baraka hopes to expose the teenagers to the world of production work in New Orleans as an alternative to crime.  “If I could clone myself to the 100th power, it would work,” he says.

Treme: The Tastes of New Orleans

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, chef Lolis Eric Elie, inspired by the award-winning television series Treme, created a collection of the best and most famous recipes from the Crescent City. Elie celebrates the culinary spirit of New Orleans and features recipes that highlight the character of the colorful city. Then, hospice care can offer relief for both the patient and loved ones by providing a medically trained caregiver. Eric Lindner discusses the all advantages to providing hospice care to a dying loved one or family member. Lolis Eric Elie and Eric Lindner, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Treme-bookcover_small

First, chef Lolis Eric Elie, inspired by the award-winning television series Treme, created a collection of the best and most famous recipes from the Crescent City. Elie celebrates the culinary spirit of New Orleans and features recipes that highlight the character of the colorful city. As rich as the series itself, the book, alos titled Treme, includes 100 heritage and contemporary recipes from the city's heralded and original recipes from renowned chefs and other Treme guest stars.

Then, terminal patients and their families face many hard decisions, especially when it comes to long term care. However, hospice care can offer emotional and physical relief for both the patient and loved ones by providing a medically trained caregiver. Eric Linder explains how a hospice caregiver can help preserve a dying patient’s sense of dignity by creating a supportive environment for all involved. Linder also tells the stories of those living the ends of their lives and celebrates the dignity with which they choose to exit this life.

Lolis Eric Elie and Eric Linder, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Costuming New Orleans Style

From B-Side Radio | Part of the B-Side: A La Carte series | 05:30

Produced by Eve Abrams this piece goes beyond Mardi Gras to examine the year-round costuming culture in New Orleans.

B-side-postcard-_front_-a00_small "Costuming New Orleans Style" Eve Abrams:
Costuming season in New Orleans stretches, more or less, from Halloween through Mardi Gras. Dressing up, and becoming not yourself for a night or a day, is a way of life in New Orleans. Many, many New Orleanians not only have a collection of costumes, they also have costuming philosophies, methods, and theories. Where else in American do adults collectively decide to dress up and play on a regular basis? And what would happen if we lost that tradition?

Voices of New Orleans

From BSR Radio | 01:01:53

Stories of Survival and Reconstruction

N1005404303248525735_small Four BSR reporters volunteered for New Orleans Habitat for Humanity over their Spring Break in March 2005. After work, covered in dirt, they piled into a minivan and drove out to the 9th Ward, Fauberg-Marigny, Lakeview and Chalmette. They met dozens of locals who, in their own way, were surviving Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. These are their stories.

New Orleans Music Soldier

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:00:02

A Katrina evacuee and aging in the inner city...this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small Jerome "Pop Agee" Johnson didn't just survive Hurricane Katrina...his dream of building a Music Hall of Fame did too. He shares his unique personal experience with the wrath of Katrina with Prime Time Radio. Then...Princeton Sociology professor, Katherine Newman went deep inside America's inner cities to explore the retirement options of middle aged and older folks. In her book, A Different Shade of Gray - she reports on how, for many, their dreams are unfulfilled.

New Orleans, LA: The Big Easy

From Al Letson | Part of the State of the Re:Union: Season One series | 53:53

The city of New Orleans is as proud of its traditions as it is steeped in them. But since the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, the city and its residents have been thrust into new relationships with those very traditions they hold so dear. State of the Re:Union visits the Big Easy and explore how the city is negotiating that tension between the old and the new — from race relations to po boys to combating crime — five years after the storm.

Sotru_profile-pic_01_small State of the Re:Union
New Orleans: The Big Easy
 
Host: Al Letson
Producer: Tina Antolini 

DESCRIPTION: The city of New Orleans is as proud of its traditions as it is steeped in them. But since the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, the city and its residents have been thrust into new relationships with those very traditions they hold so dear. State of the Re:Union visits the Big Easy and explore how the city is negotiating that tension between the old and the new — from race relations to po boys to combating crime — five years after the storm.
 
BILLBOARD (:59)
Incue: From PRX and WJCT
Outcue: But first, this news.

NEWS HOLE: 1:00- 6:00
 
Segment A (12:29)
Incue: From WJCT in Jacksonville, Florida
Outcue: That's ahead on State of the Re:Union
 
A: SILENCE IS VIOLENCE: New Orleans was a dangerous place before Hurricane Katrina devastated the city. Afterwards, crime spiked— but the storm seems to have changed many NOLA resident’s tolerance for the ongoing violence in their city.  When crime forced its way into the lives of some New Orleans residents in late 2006, they didn’t just mourn their losses. They took action. In this segment, we hear the story of how one bookish ethnomusicologist became the leader of an ongoing fight to stop the violence in New Orleans streets, inspiring thousands of people to march to city hall, and launching an effort to teach teenagers art as an alternative to violent expression.

 
SEGMENT B (18:59)
Incue: You're listening to State of the Re:Union
Outcue: PRX-dot-ORG
 
A. CULTIVATING A NEW ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT: For a long time before Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans had been suffering from brain drain. It’s the old story: talented young people graduated from high school, went away to college and never came back. It was a new story, post-Katrina. The Hurricane brought an influx of young, idealistic people—both home grown and from far flung parts of the country-- who were drawn to the city to help with the rebuilding. And many of them are sticking around, making the transition from work with non-profits into starting their own businesses….

B. A CITY OF CHANGING DEMOGRAPHICS: For all the excitement about newcomers to the city, the post-Katrina repopulation has inspired anxiety as well: what will their presence mean for a city that historically is majority African American? Not only are there new white hipsters, but New Orleans has seen a massive influx of Latino immigrants in search of day labor jobs, helping to rebuild the city… and that’s inspired tension over jobs with some other ethnic communities. In this piece, host Al Letson explores the complex racial dynamics of the city’s repopulation, and visits one group that’s trying to seize on this as an opportunity to overcome barriers.
 
C. TAKING A NEIGHBORHOOD BACK BY STORY: If you wander around New Orleans rough Central City neighborhood, you’ll see signs that say “hear my I-Witness” story, and then a phone number. Pull out your phone, call the number, and you’ll hear a local resident tell the story of that particular spot , a story that maybe no one else in the world knows, from a jazz funeral that the Free Southern Theater held for itself in 1980, to what happened at this house, during Hurricane Katrina. The idea is that retelling these stories helps form the neighborhood’s collective memory, and will bring new people into the fold.
 

SEGMENT C (18:59)
Incue: You're listening to State of the Re:Union
Outcue: to bring them back together. (music tail)
 
A. INDIAN MUSIC:  We begin  this segment’s exploration of New Orleans culture with a brief sound portrait from the Mardi Gras Indians’ annual Super Sunday tradition, introducing us to the Indians and their chants…
 
B. SISSY BOUNCE: Go to a club on a Friday night in New Orleans, and if you hear hip hop, you’ll more likely than not also be hearing Bounce. It’s a super local NOLA style of hip hop, driven by call-and-response repetitive lyrics and a distinctive skittering rhythm that sounds pure New Orleans.  It’s wildly popular in the city, and, thanks to a brand new album from the NOLA-based jam band Galactic, it may soon be making its mark across the country. But outside of its musical innovations, there’s another thing that makes some Bounce distinctive: some of its biggest stars are gay. And out. Very out. So-called “Sissy rappers” are among the hottest Bounce artists, folks like Big Freedia, Sissy Nobby, and Katey Red, a gay, transvestite from the Uptown projects. Open homosexuality and cross-dressing does have a strong history in New Orleans. Drag costume balls have been happening in the city since as early as the 40s. Now, Sissy Rappers pack the clubs.

C. SAVING THE PO BOY: In a city that loves—loves—food,  po boy sandwiches are arguably the culinary icon of the city. The sandwich is as diverse as New Orleans, a culinary crossroads, from the French bread to the fillings ranging from roast beef to fried oysters to southern ham. But Hurricane Katrina introduced a new chapter in the sandwich’s history. Already fighting fast food chains for customers, some mom & pop po boy shops in heavily flooded neighborhoods have had a hard time rebuilding. Because of Katrina closings, traditional bakeries like the father-son run Gendusa Bakery lost a huge portion of their customer base. But the hurricane also inspired the po boy’s champions: a festival and a Po Boy Preservation Society have been established in Katrina’s wake, aimed at educating young New Orleanians about the city’s signature sandwich, to make sure both it—and the families who sell it—survive.

D. DEAR NEW ORLEANS: A “Dear New Orleans” letter from Carol Bebelle, founder of the Ashe Cultural Arts Center.
 
E. “KATRINA FATIGUE” MONOLOGUE/VOX: Al offers some reflections on the degree to which New Orleans is receding from the thoughts of the rest of the U.S., and how his time in the city has changed his perceptions of it. Intermixed with Al’s monologue are the perspectives of a range of New Orleans residents. 

PROGRAM OUT @ 59:00

New Orleans, LA: The Big Easy is available on PRX without charge to all public radio stations, and may be aired an unlimited number of times prior to January 31, 2017. The program may be streamed live on station websites but not archived. Excerpting is permitted for promotional purposes only.

State of the Re:Union is presented by WJCT and distributed by PRX.  Major funding for the State of the Re:Union comes from CPB, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Delores Barr Weaver Fund at The Community Foundation for Northeast Florida.

Thanks for your consideration of State of the Re:Union with Al Letson. 

 

Katrina Survivor: New Orleans jazz singer Charmaine Neville

From Miae Kim | 27:10

Hurrican Katrina survivor's first -hand account

1030340_small Born into the third generation of the legendary musical family, jazz singer Charmaine Neville was among the thousands trapped in New Orleans. she was trapped in water for five days and witnessed dire events ? death, rape, robbery. Overshadowing all of that, she witnessed a community working together to survive. This is Charmaine?s account of Hurricane Katrina, interwoven with her own music.

Reflections on New Orleans - An exclusive interview with Marcia Ball

From Linda Seabright | 06:38

Marking 2 years since Hurricane Katrina - what's happened?- not much

Marciaballband8 I met up with Marcia after she played 2 soulful sets at the BBQ on the lawn gig on a beautiful sunny afternoon at Rancho Nicasio in Northern California. We talked in the cottage behind the club while her band toked up in the room next to us - that's some of the background whooping noises you can hear. She was passionate about the need for rebuilding in New Orleans and government's egregious lack of response. And - well - you can just listen and hear what she says....

7th Ward Residents Await the Return of Circle Food Store

From Laine Kaplan-Levenson | 04:42

More than eight years after it flooded and closed due to Hurricane Katrina, the Circle Food Store on the corner of Claiborne and St Bernard Avenues is about to reopen its doors. The historic landmark served the 7th Ward from 1938 up until the storm, and it’s said to have been the first New Orleans grocery owned and operated by African-Americans. Laine Kaplan-Levenson spoke with long time residents and customers to hear their reactions to the long-awaited return of this neighborhood staple.

Img_2002_small More than eight years after it flooded and closed due to Hurricane Katrina, the Circle Food Store on the corner of Claiborne and St Bernard Avenues is about to reopen its doors. The historic landmark served the 7th Ward from 1938 up until the storm, and it’s said to have been the first New Orleans grocery owned and operated by African-Americans. Laine Kaplan-Levenson spoke with long time residents and customers to hear their reactions to the long-awaited return of this neighborhood staple.