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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

337: The Science of Staying Cool, 5/29/2020

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 58:58

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small Imagine for a moment a world without air conditioners, refrigerators, fans, or even ice. We take them for granted — but keeping cool is a lot more complicated than you might think. As we roll into what’s predicted to be one of the hotter summers in recent memory, The Pulse explores the science of keeping cool. We hear stories about battling heat islands, designing cooler buildings, and cooling down our bodies and our minds.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2020-05-29 Feeding a Hotter Planet

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:59

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Guests (Part 1):
Twilight Greenaway, Contributing Editor, Civil Eats 
Amanda Little, Professor of Journalism, Vanderbilt University

Guests (Part 2):
Mark Kurlansky, Author, MILK! A 10,000-Year Food Fracas
Anna Lappé, Author, Diet for a Hot Planet: The Climate Crisis at the End of Your Fork)

How will we feed a planet that’s hotter, drier, and more crowded than ever? Much of it starts with innovators who are trying to re-invent the global food system to be more productive and nutritious. Vanderbilt University Journalism professor Amanda Little chronicles some of these efforts in her most recent book, The Fate of Food: What We'll Eat in a Bigger, Hotter, Smarter World.

“We see disruption in the auto industry, we see disruption in tobacco – disruption is coming in the meat industry,” says Little, noting how conventional meat companies have been investing in technologies to produce cell-based meat without animals.

Other technological innovations, such as robots that can deploy herbicide with sniper-like precision, can help push agriculture toward more sustainable practices. But she also notes the difficulties that food startups face in getting their products to scale – which often means selling to large, industrial producers.

Twilight Greenaway, a contributing editor with Civil Eats, amplifies these concerns about tech disruption in the food space. “Will there be some [technology] that really can feed into a more democratic food system that allows for different types of ownership less concentrated ownership,” she asks.

Growing, packaging, producing and disposing of the food we eat makes up a big part of our climate footprint.  And it’s easy to send blame down the supply chain. Can environmentalists, farmers and ranchers all get along?

Anna Lappé’s research into global food production has convinced her that they can -- if everyone works together toward the shared goal of fixing the climate. “A lot of environmentalists are starting to realize that farmers really are both on the front lines of the climate impacts, but also they’re on the front lines of the climate solutions,” Lappé says.

Author Mark Kurlansky agrees that we should be looking for solutions -- not pointing fingers. “Most farmers and most ranchers and most fishermen do not want to do harm,” says Kurlansky.  “They do want to earn a living.  And if their ways of earning a living are doing harm, you know, you have to convince them that there's a better way to do it.”


RELATED LINKS

The Fate of Food: What We'll Eat in a Bigger, Hotter, Smarter World
Climate Change-Fueled Valley Fever is Hitting Farmworkers Hard
Memphis Meats
Blue River Technology
Diet for a Hot Planet
MILK! A 10,000 Year Food Fracas
Livestock’s Long Shadow (United Nations)
The Empathy of Food (TEDx Talk)

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Sun Dog (#1507)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

Sundog_small Carrie from Waupaca, Wisconsin, confesses she was stumped when that her son Aidan asked,"Mom, can you do a winter pepper?"

An ad campaign featuring the phrase The Last Straw urging people not to use plastic straws has Allie in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, wondering about double meanings in advertising. Research shows that such punning can be effective.

On Twitter, @laureneoneal wonders why the term ob-gyn is pronounced by sounding out all the letters, as if it's an initialism.

Eleven-year-old Ben calls from Rapids City to ask about the term sun dog, the meterological phenomenon in which a bright spot appears to the left or right of the sun. No one knows the origin of this term. Synonyms include mock sun, weather gall, and parhelion, from Greek words meaning beside the sun.

Some 50 years ago, says Susan from Burbank, California, she and a friend made up a game involving prefixes and suffixes, which led to such nonsense words as epidormithry and postpreparize.

Ever notice how many comic-book villains have names ending in the letter O? For starters,  there's Magneto, Sinestro, and Bizarro. Quiz Guy John Chaneski's puzzle features new villains with names that are common words ending in -o. For example, who's the villain who takes large islands and breaks them up into chains of smaller islands?

Barbara in Cardiff-by-the-Sea, California, wonders about the term mob scene, means an unruly, dense crowd. The term arose in the world of theater, where it denotes a point in a performance with lots of people onstage. The word mob is a shortening of Latin mobile vulgus, which means fickle crowd.

The phrase throw in the towel, meaning to give up, originated in the world of boxing. An earlier phrase from the same sport that carried the same metaphorical meaning is chuck in the sponge.

Andrew in Omaha, Nebraska, recalls his grandfather's use of the word George to mean exceptionally good, and Double George to mean really great. Other masculine names, including Jake, Tom, and Jerry have meant something similar. In the 1950s, the name George was used among casino workers for a high roller, as in Here comes George.

The German word for longjohns, Liebestoter, literally means love killer.

Rick calls from Rouses Point, New York, to ask about the etymology of the phrase hang for a sheep as for a lamb, meaning go for broke or go all out. The answer has involves the old tradition of capital punishment for theft. Given the risk of such dire consequences, one might as well steal the item that's more valuable. There's a similar Scots proverb that goes as well be hanged for a wedder as for a lamb, a wedder being a male castrated sheep. The word wedder is linguistically related to bellwether, a large, castrated sheep wearing a bell and therefore indicative of where the herd is going.

Our conversation about being criticized for using yes ma'am and no sir, prompted a letter from an Austin, Texas, listener who had a similar experience when she moved from Mississippi to Ohio.

The state of Idaho has a large community of Basque speakers. Their native tongue is what's known as a language isolate, meaning one that is not historically connected to those around it.

The name George derives from the Greek word for farmer, a combination of words that literally mean earth worker.

Ellen in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, wonders about the origin of the exclamation Geezum Pete! It's a minced oath -- that is a way of avoiding saying Jesus Christ! There are dozens of similar euphemized exclamations, including gee willikins, jiminy, Jehosaphat, Judas Priest, Jeekers, Jiminy Cricket, Jiminy Crickets, Gee willikers, Gee Christmas, Jiminy Christmas, and Jerusalem.

Michael in Papillion, Nebraska, asks: Why do we refer to that adjustable vent that regulates air flow in a home as a register?

This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Mx101 Ep98: Phil Collins Watched A Guy Drown? (Urban Legends Of Rock), 5/28/2020

From KUNC & The Colorado Sound | Part of the Music 101 series | 56:59

Music_101_recent_small Did anyone ever tell you a story that began with "this happened to a friend of a friend of mine"? If so, the story you were told was likely an urban legend. Urban Legends typically have a moral standard attached or reflect specific prejudices. It should be no surprise that rock music has quite a few. We'll debunk some of the most persistent in this episode of Music 101.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR125: OHR Presents: The Bluegrastronauts, 6/8/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Bluegrastronauts_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, blast off with the Matchsellers’ “Bluegrastronauts,” the world’s first outer-space bluegrass odyssey, recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Mixing elements of tall tales, theater, science fiction and bluegrass, the Bluegrastonauts show isn’t quite like anything you’ve ever heard. 

The Matchsellers are Warsaw, Indiana native Andrew Morris and Julie Bates of Kansas City, Missouri. Their exciting, gritty, and often hilarious stage show has been developed over six years of touring across the US and Europe.  Performing at the Ozark Folk Center State Park, Andrew and Julie present their outer-space bluegrass odyssey with a four piece stringband, featuring Chad Graves of The Hillbenders on dobro, and Betsey Mae on bass.  The group combines absurdity, authenticity, and excellent musicianship to create a performance that is representative of the present age:  They are pleasantly stuck between the years gone by and those to come.

The Matchsellers’ Bluegrastronauts is old-time in outer space.  It’s a far away galaxy as close as your first cousin.  It’s a 100,000-mile-an-hour horse and buggy.  Dressed as space travelers from the year 2437, the Matchsellers’ Bluegrastronauts take audiences through a musical “history of the future,” including a first-hand account of the Apocalypse of 2137, the subsequent colonization of the moon, and the dangers of playing hopscotch in deep space.  The show reaches the heights of absurdity while confronting deeply humanist issues of love, disillusionment, and mortality.  Prepare to travel through space and old-time with one of the most unique and ambitious acts in acoustic music today.
  - https://thematchsellers.com/bluegrastronauts-band/ 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1978 recording of mountain dulcimer master David Schnaufer performing the traditional tune “Red Haired Boy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 20-22: Hospital Farming, Rural Food Shopping And Commercial Fishing, 5/29/2020

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 29:00

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“The idea behind the farm was to really connect people more with their food and promote wellness. So it’s easy to tell someone they need to eat healthier, I mean we’re kind of finding out that just saying you need to eat healthier doesn’t really have that impact.”  --Christine Davies

This week on the show, connecting gardening, fresh produce and community health. As COVID-19 drives a renewed interest in homegrown food, we give a second listen to my conversation with Christine Davies on the Community Farm at Anderson Hospital, North East of Indianapolis. 

Harvest Public Media has a story on how the pandemic has affected rural grocery stores and we have a story about commercial fishing in Oregon from Josephine McRobbie and Joe O'Connell. 


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio (Series)

Produced by Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

416: Vivian Howard at Home: Turnip Run Ups, Hand Pies and Southern Porridge, 5/28/2020

From Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio | Part of the Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio series | 53:58

Msl_radio_logo_cobrand_prx_small This week, we chat with Vivian Howard about growing up on a tobacco farm in Deep Run, North Carolina; her latest TV show, “Somewhere South”; and the foods she considers her flavor MVPs. Plus, we explore the future of algae-based food; Dan Pashman puts a modern twist on family cocktail parties; and we make Mashed Avocados with Sesame and Chili.

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

622: Home School, 5/30/2020

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | 59:00

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The coronavirus pandemic has forced students to do most of their learning online, but what about the tens of millions of families who don’t have access to reliable high-speed internet? Reporter Will Carless investigates why an estimated $100 billion in federal spending has failed to close the digital divide. 


In our next story, high school junior Sarah Alli-Brown shares an audio diary of what life has been like since her Chicago high school closed its doors in mid-March. Alli-Brown has twin 8-year-old brothers. With their school shuttered and their single mom working two jobs as an essential worker, Alli-Brown now cares for her siblings full time while also trying to balance the challenges of distance learning. 


Next, host Al Letson talks to Michelle Sandoval Villegas, who last year was named Texas secondary teacher of the year. Villegas, a math teacher at Parkland Middle School in El Paso, describes the challenges of teaching remotely while also helping to ensure her students have their basic needs met.


Finally, we dip into Ginger Fox’s class at Acorn Woodland Elementary School in Oakland, California, to hear what her third-grade students like best about sheltering in place and what they wish they could change. 


This episode was produced in partnership with Chalkbeat.

With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Future Farming of America (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

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Southwest Virginia has seen a decline in coal and tobacco—two industries that once boomed in the region. Could hemp be a way to boost the local economy? Ryan Huish (University of Virginia’s College at Wise) and Michael Timko (University of Virginia) are collaborating on an Industrial Hemp project to explore hemp’s potential for repairing lands damaged by coal mining. Plus: When the Food and Drug Administration approved the production and sale of genetically modified salmon in 2015, some consumers were alarmed by the prospect of consuming “Frankenfish.” But are all genetically modified foods dangerous? Eric Hallerman (Virginia Tech) makes the case for accepting some of them.  Also: When a person’s time is taken up by the needs of daily subsistence due to poverty, environmental concerns can recede as a priority. When we talked to Camellia Moses Okpodu for this interview, she was at Norfolk State University (Xavier University) investigating ways to get more disenfranchised minorities and people who are economically at risk interested in environmental activism.


Are We Alone?

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:59

If there is intelligent life beyond Earth, how would that change life ON Earth?

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News that life might exist or have existed on Mars or somewhere else in our universe excites many. But should we really be happy to hear that news? What are the philosophical implications of the possibility of extraterrestrial life? If life can blossom in our own cosmic backyard, then that means that the universe is most likely saturated with life forms. And if that’s the case, why haven’t we found any evidence of other civilizations? Is it because all civilizations are prone to suicidal destruction at a certain point in their development? If so, how might we avoid this fate? The Philosophers search for life with Paul Davies from Arizona State University, author of The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Celebrating 30 Years of Hubble with Astronaut John Grunsfeld

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Stsci-h-p2016a-m-2000x1374_hubble_30th_cosmic_reef_small_small Former astronaut and NASA Associate Administrator John Grunsfeld is often called the Hubble Repairman. He made three space shuttle trips to the space telescope to repair and upgrade it. Now he looks back over three decades of science, beautiful images, and inspiration delivered by the HST. Rubber asteroids are back, and you might win one in the new What’s Up space trivia contest. Great links, including to Mat Kaplan’s live interview with John Grunsfeld, are at https://www.planetary.org/multimedia/planetary-radio/show/2020/0527-2020-john-grunsfeld-hubble-30th.html

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

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Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 05/22/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Lp2_small This week on the show: we examine personal choice in relation to CO2 emissions and other environmental issues. What changes have we made in our homes and lives to reduce our impacts on the Earth? And how much do these decisions actually matter amidst the global realities of climate change?

Tara Austin

From KUMD | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
KUMD

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 200602 11PM: ClassicalWorks (Episode 74), 6/2/2020 11:00 PM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 58:59

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 74)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse, LLC.

Most recent piece in this series:

1607.3: Jazz with David Basse 1607.3, 6/3/2020 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse, LLC. | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 59:53

Thumbnail_copy_small Jazz with David Basse

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

Moral Economics

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 59:00

Screen_shot_2020-05-28_at_5 John Maynard Keynes was a philosophical giant in twentieth-century England. In his day job, he was a public economist; in America he was a political football for the very idea of “deficit spending” to charge up private investment in a recession. It made the name “Keynes” a cuss word until our politicians fell in love with deficits as a way to pay for tax cuts and wars. “We are all Keynesians now,” Richard Nixon said, in Vietnam time. It’s only much later, in long hindsight, that Keynes the philosopher returns as if in a dream: the social and moral thinker, a sprightly, prophetic, and humane writer who could see money, finance, employment, justice, peace, and security as a linked system to be studied and managed for common purposes.

The subject is John Maynard Keynes, thinker and writer of genius and consequence in England between the two world wars. He is back to life in a dazzling biography of the moral philosopher inside the famous economist. Zachary Carter is our guest; he has rewritten the life story—emphasis on the humanity of Keynes’s thinking and the artistic beauty of his prose. Keynes was an economist mostly without numbers, though he started out as a mathematician. He makes literary and moral connections with Edmund Burke, the Anglo-Irish conservative, and implies a sort of kinship with George Orwell, another radical but anti-revolutionary English socialist of Keynes’s period.

 

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions I22: Azar Lawrence's "Summer Solstice" and classic music of Erroll Garner

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Lawrence_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, magical music from Azar Lawrence's stunning 1975 album "Summer Solstice," reissued on audiophile LP in the United States a few weeks before the winter solstice last year.  We also have the first two albums to come out in 2020 of the continuing album reissue series on pianist Erroll Garner from Mack Avenue Records, "Up In Erroll's Room" and "That's My Kick." These are the seventh and eight albums in the planned 12-disc series. Also: a band called Works For Me featuring rising star saxophonist Alexa Tarantino with their album "Reach Within."  Plus: a song from the new album from 91-year-old Chicago bluesman Jimmy Johnson, "Every Day Of Your Life."

promo included: promo-I22

Blue Dimensions G43: A Trinity Of "Presence"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Three recent albums all entitled "Presence," from Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, John Petrucelli, and Brad Whitely.

Evans_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we are surprised to note that three jazz albums entitled "Presence" have come out in 2018, and we've decided to draw music from all three of them - - one from pianist Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, some high-energy stuff recorded in concert at two jazz clubs in Philadelphia, one from pianist Brad Whitely, a strong studio recording, and another live one, a double album from saxophonist and composer John Petrucelli with lots of strings and a scallop shell used as an instrument as well. Three engaging and very different albums, all called "Presence," coming up in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: promo-G43

Feminine Fusion (Series)

Produced by WCNY

Most recent piece in this series:

S04 Ep40: Rosin Rising, 6/6/2020

From WCNY | Part of the Feminine Fusion series | :00

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Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWF 19-26: Kissingen Summer, 3/23/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:56

J_rvi_small We train the microphone on one of today's most exciting conductors and on a brilliant young Russian singer: Paavo Järvi and Julia Lezhneva both perform and share their thoughts on this program from the festival Kissingen Summer.

High Country Celtic Radio (Series)

Produced by High Country Celtic Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

High Country Celtic Radio 114 - Quarantunes Free For All

From High Country Celtic Radio | Part of the High Country Celtic Radio series | 59:00

High-country-celtic-240x240_medium_small

This week, Katie and Joe dive into a frenzy of great tunes and songs that aren't linked by any kind of holiday or theme. We're calling this our "Quarantunes Free For All" show.
We're featuring tracks from Paul Meehan, Tantra, Altan, Ashley MacIsaac, The Here & Now, The Boulder Irish Session, Nollaig Casey, Laura Risk, Nomos, Kornog, Skeduz, Pennoú Skoulm, and Téada. 
Our FairPlé score this week: 31

406: Celebrating the Birthday of Bucky Pizzarelli, 1/1/2019

From KCUR | Part of the 12th Street Jump Weekly series | 59:00

(Air Dates: December 31 - January 8) On this week's archive episode of 12th Street Jump, we celebrate the music of Bucky Pizzarelli with Bucky himself and his long time music partner Ed Laub. We'll play a game of "So, What's Your Question" with Ed and talk to Bucky about what gives him the blues.

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Public Radio's weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, 12th STREET JUMP celebrates America's original art form, live from one of its birthplaces, 12th Street in Kansas City. That is where Basie tickled and ivories and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues. Each week, host Ebony Fondren offers up a lively hour of topical sketch comedy and some great live jazz and blues from the 12th STREET JUMP band (musical director Joe Cartright, along with Tyrone Clark on bass and Arnold Young on drums) and vocalist David Basse. Special guests join the fun every week down at the 12th Street Jump.

Latin Jazz Perspective (T-5)

From Tony Vasquez | Part of the Latin Perspective - Latin Jazz Hour (weekly) series | 59:01

A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.

Yvettei_small A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.
This week edition is a special presentation on the Latin Jazz Flute.
Featuring Latin /Latin Jazz flautists from the past and present who where a major force
in the historical continuum of the music.

Notes from the Jazz Underground #44 - Jazz in Chicago, 2019

From WDCB | Part of the Notes from the Jazz Underground series | 58:00

With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.

Nftju_logo_small_small With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.