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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

260: Body Politics, 12/7/2018

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 58:59

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small Our bodies are ours, but how we feel about them is largely defined by others — by the things people say, the culture we live in, the messages we get about which kinds of bodies are acceptable… and which kinds aren’t. On this episode of The Pulse, we look at how culture and politics shape the way we feel about our bodies. We’ll hear stories about bodies transformed by disease, weight, and age, and how those changes affect people’s sense of identity. We’ll also talk about the struggle to reclaim bodies from other people’s narratives about what is strong or beautiful, ugly or dangerous.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2018-12-09 Fire and Water: A Year of Climate Conversations

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:56

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Host: Greg Dalton

Guests (in order of appearance):
Lizzie Johnson
Scott Stephens
Francis Suarez
Steve Benjamin
Sylvester Turner
Solomon Hsiang
Katherine Mach
Arlie Hochschild
Eliza Griswold
Debbie Dooley
Christine Pelosi
Christiana Figueres
Roy Scranton
Davida Herzl
Gabriel Kra
Lydia Dervisheva
Mike Selden
Patrick Brown
Sanjay Dastoor
Megan Rose Dickey

In this special episode we look back at the climate stories of 2018 by listening to excerpts from a year of climate conversations.

San Francisco Chronicle reporter Lizzie Johnson and UC Berkeley Professor of Fire Science Scott Stephens describe how the higher temperatures and lower humidity, brought on by climate change, are whipping up hotter and bigger wildfires and upending people’s lives in ever more dramatic and traumatic ways.

The Mayors of three cities on the frontlines of climate change – Steve Benjamin of Columbia SC, Francis Suarez of Miami FL, and Sylvester Turner of Houston TX – discuss what their cities are doing to recover, rebuild, and prepare for the next mega-storm.

Rising temperatures and seas will produce losers and winners. Solomon Hsiang, Professor of Public Policy at UC Berkeley and Katharine Mach, Senior Research Scientist at Stanford, explain how some parts of the world may actually see more moderate weather and economic gains, while others are already seeing sagging property prices and economic losses.

New Yorker writer Eliza Griswold and UC Berkeley sociologist Arlie Hochschild each wrote books that tell tales of people whose lives have been impacted by America’s craving for energy, the choices they’ve made, and their fight to protect their families and their environment.

Christine Pelosi, Executive Committeewoman of Democratic National Committee, and Debbie Dooley, clean energy advocate and staunch Trump supporter, discuss the politics of energy and how Democrats and Republicans are not always as divided on climate as Washington politics makes it seem.

Former UN climate negotiator Christiana Figueres credits Buddhist teachings both for helping her through a personal crisis, and for providing a source of inner strength that sustained her through negotiations at the 2015 Paris Climate Accord and helped contribute to its success.

When we think about the enormity of climate change and what it’s doing to our planet, it’s easy to get overwhelmed, even shut down, by despair. But Author Roy Scranton, who believes the situation calls for a change of consciousness, doesn’t think despair is such a bad place to be.

Greg talks to three members of the new generation of entrepreneurs who are fighting global warming by advancing clean technology: Gabriel Kra, Managing Director at Prelude Ventures; Lidiya Dervisheva, an Associate at G2VP; and Davida Herzl, co-founder and CEO of Aclima, a company using hyper-local data to better understand our environment.

Patrick Brown, Founder and CEO of Impossible Foods, and Mike Selden, Co-founder and CEO of Finless Foods, describe their work as part of a new generation of companies creating innovative food products that mimic meat and have much smaller environmental impacts.

Sanjay Dastoor, Co-Founder of Boosted Boards and CEO of Skip Scooters, and Megan Rose Dickey, Senior Reporter at TechCrunch, discuss the future of urban mobility and the electric scooters, skateboards and bicycles that are popping up all over in cities all over the country.

In the final segment, we hear some of the unfiltered truth and bare-knuckle journalism that went on during the Climate One Lightning Rounds this past year.


A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Cootie Shot (#1510)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

9378571076_0871b1ce6d_m_small Belly tickler, dipsy doodle, johnny-come-lately, duck and dip, how-do-you-do, tickle bump, yes-ma'am, thank-you-ma'am, kiss-me-quick, and cahot are all terms used in various parts of the United States denoting a bump in the road. Particularly in southwest Pennsylvania, the term Yankee bump refers to ice or snow that's intentionally packed to send sledders flying into the air.


Marisa in Bellingham, Washington, was puzzled by a traffic sign in Massachusetts that read Thickly Settled. As far back as the 1830s, the term thickly settled was used in the Massachusetts legal code to refer to an area with a lot of structures, such as a business district, or residences within 200 feet of each other, so the sign warns drivers that the road may be congested with traffic.


Pam in Eureka, California, says that when her mother and grandmother would enter a particularly dark room, they'd remark that it was dark as the inside of a goat. Mark Twain used the phrase dark as the inside of a cow in his book Roughing It as well as The Innocents Abroad. Other versions: dark as the inside of a whale, dark as the inside of a cat, dark as the inside of a black cat, dark as the inside of a sack, dark as the inside of a horse, dark as the inside of a magician's hat, dark as the inside of a coal scuttle, dark as the inside of the Devil's waistcoat pocket, and dark as the inside of a needle. Joyce Cary wrote about something being as dark as the inside of a cabinet minister, and Groucho Marx also had something to say about the lack of light inside a living creature.


Quiz Guy John Chaneski has a quiz about unusual names for sports teams. For example, what minor-league baseball team has a name that appears to derive from the word for a large-scale weather event, but actually comes from the team's proximity to a legendary rollercoaster?


Karen from Santa Barbara, California, wonders about the verb to retire. Why doesn't it mean to tire all over again? The Spanish word for retirement, jubilacion, is cognate with the English word jubilation.


A step-and-repeat is the sponsor-studded banner or wall that serves as a backdrop for photographs at event.


Is there a difference between the adverbs maybe and perhaps? They're basically synonyms, but of the two, perhaps tends to appear in language of a slightly higher register. The affected language in an old Taster's Choice coffee commercial makes effective use of this difference.


Elizabeth in Suffolk, Virginia, spent her early childhood in Hawaii, then moved to Indiana and found that kids had a different playground game that involved pretending to use a cootie shot to inoculate someone against imagined bugs, or cooties. In Indiana, they drew two circles on the back of someone's hand then poked that hand with a finger, chanting Circle circle dot dot, now you have your cootie shot. In Hawaii, Elizabeth learned it as Circle circle dot dot, now you have your uku shot. The Hawaiian word 'uku means flea, and the word ukulele derives from Hawaiian words that mean jumping flea, a reference to the rapid motion of a musician's fingers on the instrument's strings.


In railroad workers' slang, the expression to bake a cake means to build up steam in a locomotive by stoking a fire. Another term for a train's fireman is bakehead.


Joe Moran's essay on writing well suggests that his forthcoming book is a great read. It's called First You Write a Sentence: The Elements of Reading, Writing … and Life.


Taryn in Washington, D.C., wants to know the proper way to pronounce the word museum.


Johanna in Munising, Michigan, has a funny story about a childhood misunderstanding.


Guitarists sometimes refer to their instrument as an ax. But at least as early as the 1940s, the slang term ax referred to other instruments, including trombones and saxophones. The name probably derives from the slang term woodshedding, which goes back to the 1920s and suggests the idea of going out to the woodshed to practice in solitude. Other terms for playing an instrument include chopping and shredding.


David in Portland, Oregon, wants a word for that moment of puzzlement when you're trying to figure out which bin to use for tossing your recyclables. Discomposted, maybe?


Ed in Florence, South Carolina, remembers that when he was stationed at Grand Forks Air Force Base in North Dakota, the locals used a couple of words he'd never heard. They'd use Ish! as an interjection to express disgust and ishy, which describes something disgusting or revolting. These terms are heard primarily in North Dakota, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, and most likely comes from the language of Swedish and Norwegian settlers in the region.


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Mx101 Ep38: Supergroups, 12/6/2018

From KUNC & The Colorado Sound | Part of the Music 101 series | 56:59

Music_101_recent_small Sometimes musicians from different bands get together to record. These hybrid groups are typically known as "supergroups". This week on Music 101 we'll explore the supergroup phenomenon from the very first to supergroups formed this year.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR076: OHR Presents: Christmas!, 12/17/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Christmas songs both traditional & rare, performed by an interesting array of folk musicians, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Hosts Dave Smith & Mark Jones present these festive archival holiday recordings.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of his father, Country Music Hall of Fame legend Grandpa Jones reciting a poem called “The Christmas Guest.”  Aubry Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile the story of folk music royalty Jean Ritchie’s first family Christmas tree.

Musicians at the Ozark Folk Center State Park have been putting on Christmas music shows for over four decades.  As with most music performed at the park, the Christmas music represented here is not your normal collection of holiday standards.  You’ll hear a few songs that you know and love, as well as many others that you’ve likely never encountered before.  The eclectic range of musicians performing on this edition of Ozark Highlands Radio include Grandpa Jones, Randall Hylton, The Dowden Sisters, The Lonesome Cowboys, Joni Bishop, Bob Olivera, The Heritage Quartet, and more.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of his father, country music legend Grandpa Jones, reciting a poem called “The Christmas Guest,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Renowned folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode relates Jean Ritchie’s own childhood memories of an early Ritchie Family Christmas.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 18-49: Local Walnuts Transformed Into Craft Spirits, 12/7/2018

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 29:01

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This week on Earth Eats we’re sure to get you into the holiday spirit with a behind-the-scenes look at the making of a walnut liqueur. Earth Eats visits Cardinal Spirits on bottling day.
Cardinal Spirit is a craft distillery in Bloomington, Indiana. A festive spirit available this time of year is their Nocino. I Spoke with co-founder Adam Quirk and several other members of the Cardinal team in late October about the process behind the liqueur. 
And Chef Daniel Orr has a spicy twist on traditional latkes for Hannukah. His are made with sweet potatoes. 

Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio (Series)

Produced by Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

236: Pizza, Chocolate Fountains and Mac & Cheese for 5,000 People: Alon Shaya's Long Road to Chefdom, 12/6/2018

From Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio | Part of the Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio series | 53:58

Msl_radio_logo_cobrand_prx_small Alon Shaya is having a moment—he’s just opened two new restaurants and published his first book. But his success wasn’t always a given. We chat about his circuitous path and the food he ate along the way. Also on this week's show: Julia Turshen makes magic out of leftovers (tomato sauce becomes tomato soup); secrets to oven-poached salmon; four unexpected ways to use tahini; and Dan Pashman remembers Homer Simpson and food.

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

450: Sins of the Fathers, 12/15/2018

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | :00

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With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Drawing History (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 28:59

Comic-books-1004x618_small Sometimes, to tell a complex story, you need simple pictures. Around the country, historians and community organizations are commemorating the 400th anniversary of 1619. That’s the first year that African Americans and European women first arrived at Jamestown. A conference at Norfolk State University has asked students to draw graphic novels that explore 1619 from African, Indigenous, and European perspectives. And: Tommy Bryant explores the epic history of African Americans in comic books, from the 1960s through Black Panther’s global successAnd: Matthew Smith just co-curated a major museum exhibit about the history of comics. His mission is to convince the public that comic books are a serious art form, as worthy of preservation and scholarly attention as painting, sculpture, or literature.

Are We Alone?

From Philosophy Talk | 53:59

If there is intelligent life beyond Earth, how would that change life ON Earth?

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News that life might exist or have existed on Mars or somewhere else in our universe excites many. But should we really be happy to hear that news? What are the philosophical implications of the possibility of extraterrestrial life? If life can blossom in our own cosmic backyard, then that means that the universe is most likely saturated with life forms. And if that’s the case, why haven’t we found any evidence of other civilizations? Is it because all civilizations are prone to suicidal destruction at a certain point in their development? If so, how might we avoid this fate? The Philosophers search for life with Paul Davies from Arizona State University, author of The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Last Week, Mars. This week, An Asteroid Called Bennu.

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Nasa-osiris-rex-spacecraft-arrived-at-bennu_small_small

The InSight lander has only just arrived on Mars. Now, OSIRIS REx has reached asteroid Bennu after traveling through deep space for a year and a half. We’ll talk with the Planetary Society’s Jason Davis about this mission that will bring a sample of Bennu back to Earth after it has learned all it can over the next 19 months. Then we’ll return to the Red Planet for a conversation with the leader of the InSight mission, Bruce Banerdt. We’ve got very special prizes for this week’s What’s Up space trivia contest. Learn more at http://www.planetary.org/multimedia/planetary-radio/show/2018/1205-2018-osiris-rex-bruce-banerdt-insight-pi.html

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

Walk_to_walk_small

Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 12/07/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Lp4_small This week on the show: Earth, our home. As world leaders meet for COP24 to discuss climate change, we're asking what does home mean for the people — and animals — we share the planet with. We're looking at what decisions are being made to help protect planet Earth, our home.

Tara Austin

From KUMD | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
KUMD

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 181212 11PM: ClassicalWorks (Episode 295), 12/12/2018 11:00 PM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 59:00

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 295)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse LLC

Most recent piece in this series:

1304.3: Jazz with David Basse 1304.3, 12/7/2018 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse LLC | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 59:53

Jwdb_small Jazz with David Basse

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

Tech Tyranny

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 59:00

Playing
Tech Tyranny
From
Open Source

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You know you’re embedded in the Digital Age when you’re typing your anxieties into the Woebot app to get free, anonymous CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy). It’s Digital Age anxiety we’re all cringing at in the movie Eighth Grade, Bo Burnham’s heart-breaking comedy about a nervous, shy 13-year-old, beset by FOMO, clutching her iPhone under her pillow through the night. You’re waking up in the Digital Age when you realize that Lyft and Uber taxi rates don’t work half as well for the drivers as for the passenger class. You’re getting sick of the Digital Age when you don’t go to the dating apps; they come to you and lead the dance. You might be stuck in the Digital Age when you notice you haven’t been out of the house all week. 

Digital distemper has been the trend through 2018. Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg looked like presidential timber early last year, at age 33, “connecting the world, giving everyone a voice,” and dropping in on every state in the Union. Today he looks like a piñata in our Congress—in Britain’s parliament, too. But it’s not all about poor Zuck, or even Facebook’s cutthroat business practices, or the major mischief of Russian trolls, hacking our politics on line. Maybe it’s the inhuman speed of the tech, the sudden size of five digital monsters: F.A.N.G.A., Facebook, Apple, Netflix, Google, Amazon. Maybe, it’s the infiltration of language, psychology work, family, everything—the intrusiveness of it all. People say they don’t use apps now as much as apps use them. Turn off a new car engine, and the screen says: “Goodbye!” Hello?


Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions G49: Guitarist Andreas Varady takes us on "The Quest"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Varady_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, a new album "The Quest" from guitarist Andreas Varady. At age 20, Varady is a veteran of the music biz, with years of performing experience behind him, and a magical touch on the guitar, who composes and arranges all of his music and works with his father and brother in the band. His career has been promoted by Quincy Jones. A native of Slovakia of Hungarian Roma descent, Varady at times seems to tap into the restless magic of Django Reinhardt. "The Quest" is Varady's second US release.  Also in this hour, a song from "3's A Crowd," the duet album of drummer Billy Jones; we'll hear a drum-saxophone duet - - plus, twenty-three years after it was recorded, the release of Eliane Elias's album "Music From Man Of La Mancha," co-produced with the late Mitch Leigh, composer of the music for the hit Broadway musical about Don Quixote, and Hart, Scone & Albin "Leading the British Invasion," a new album of jazzified British pop music, with a song that was a hit for Sade in 1984.

promo included: promo-G49

Folk Alley #181018

From WKSU | Part of the Folk Alley series | 01:57:58

Folk Alley host Elena See presents an exciting, eclectic and intelligent mix of the best traditional folk, Americana, contemporary singer/songwriters, and roots music, from the latest releases, classics, and exclusive in-studio Folk Alley Sessions and live concert recordings. Two discreet hours each week. Available as a one- or two-hour program.

Playing
Folk Alley #181018
From
WKSU

Folk_alley_logo_-_tan_matte_240_medium_small This week on Folk Alley, in hour one, some spooky tunes to kick off the Halloween season with music by The Dave Rawlings Machine, Asylum Street Spankers, and Langhorne Slim; new music from Gregory Alan Isakov, Lucy Kaplansky, and Willie Nelson; a 2'fer from Missy Raines' new work, 'Royal Traveller'; and powerful and poignant song addressing gun violence written by Mark Erelli featuring Rosanne Cash, Lori McKenna, Anais Mitchell, etc. All this, plus favorites from Case/lang/Veirs, Martin Sexton, Mavis Staples, and more. 

In hour two, new music from J.P. Harris, Courtney Hartman & Taylor Ashton, Childsplay, Kathy Mattea, and Amy Ray's 'Holler'; also a set from some brothers featuring the Barr, the Avett, and the Brother Brothers; all this plus favorites from Della Mae, Solas, John Hartford, Jeffrey Foucault, and more. 

Blue Dimensions G43: A Trinity Of "Presence"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Three recent albums all entitled "Presence," from Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, John Petrucelli, and Brad Whitely.

Evans_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we are surprised to note that three jazz albums entitled "Presence" have come out in 2018, and we've decided to draw music from all three of them - - one from pianist Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, some high-energy stuff recorded in concert at two jazz clubs in Philadelphia, one from pianist Brad Whitely, a strong studio recording, and another live one, a double album from saxophonist and composer John Petrucelli with lots of strings and a scallop shell used as an instrument as well. Three engaging and very different albums, all called "Presence," coming up in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: promo-G43