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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

253: Global Warning, 10/19/2018

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | :00

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Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2018-10-21 Will China Save the Planet?

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:57

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Host: Greg Dalton

Guests:
Barbara Finamore, Author, "Will China Save the Planet?"  (Polity, 2018)
Carter Roberts, CEO, World Wildlife Fund

Chinese factories churn out parts and products that end up in our cars, our kitchens and our cell phones. And all that productivity has improved the lives of its citizens, many of whom can now afford cars and cell phones of their own. It’s also made China the global leader in carbon emissions - but that tide may be turning. In her new book, “Will China Save the Planet,” Barbara Finamore says that China may well take the lead in saving the world from environmental catastrophe. How? By phasing out coal and investing in green energy to power its factories and keep its cities moving. With the US federal government cutting efforts to curb carbon pollution, is it possible that China is our best hope for saving the planet?

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Take Tea for the Fever (#1508)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

239161832_942ce0d79c_m_small Another term for moth is miller or dusty miller, so named the powdery wings of these insects recall the image of a miller covered in flour. That's also the inspiration behind the name of the dusty miller plant.

Elaine from Boulder, Colorado, wonders: What's the origin of the slang term to clock someone meaning to hit them?

After the death of Aretha Franklin, her ex-husband described her as someone who didn't take tea for the fever. If you don't take tea for the fever, you refuse to put up with any nonsense. This .expression appears in a story by Langston Hughes.

Jeff from Huntsville, Alabama, remembers playing a game on family road trips called padiddle. If you see a car at night with one headlight out, you say Padiddle! The first person to do so gets to punch a fellow passenger. His wife's family played a variation in which the winner was entitled to a kiss. There are various rules for the game and various names, including perdiddle perdunkle, pasquaddle, cockeye, cockeye piddle, dinklepink, and popeye. There's also the slug bug version that specifically involves spotting a Volkswagen.

A keysmash is a random string of letters typed as a way of indicating intense emotion, such as frustration.

There are scores of new television shows out there, which inspired Quiz Guy John Chaneski's puzzle based on names of TV programs you may not have heard of. For example, is Cloak and Dagger a series about spies in the 1940s, or is it about two superheroes called Cloak and Dagger?

Cecily from Indianapolis, Indiana, recalls her North Carolina-born grandmother would describe someone doing something stupid as being crazy as a Betsy bug. The phrase alludes to the horned beetle, also known as the patent-leather beetle, a large black insect that makes a whirring noise when disturbed. It's also called a Betsy bug, bess bug, or bessie bug.

Joseph from Wilson, Wyoming, wonders: Why is subpar, or in other words under par, a good thing in golf but nowhere else?

Sue from Rancho Palos Verdes, California, says her daughter Pip used to talk about how much she loved the jazz singer Elephants Gerald.

Judith in Newbury Park, California, shares a funny story about how she used to mispronounce the word grotesque with three syllables. This term meaning strange or unnatural or absurdly exaggerated goes back to Italian grottesca, or having to do with caves, and refers to fantastical subterranean murals discovered in Roman ruins featuring strange and exaggerated figures. Thus grotesque is a linguistic relative of the word grotto. Another English term associated with those bizarre paintings the word antic, from Italian antica, meaning old, and a relative of the English word antique.

Susan in Traverse City, Michigan, wonders if there's a single English word that denotes the relationship between two mothers-in-law, two fathers-in-law, or a mother-in-law and father-in-law. Co-mother seems too vague, and the psychologists' terms affine or co-affine, from the same root as affinity, aren't used widely among the rest of the population. In Spanish there's consuegro, and in Yiddish machatunim, as well as words in Portuguese, Italian, and Greek, but nothing that's been adopted into English, and the German Gegenschwiegermutter doesn't seem a likely candidate, either.

Silence exists in more than one form. In his book Speaking and Language: Defence of Poetry, Paul Goodman eloquently evokes several of them.

Will from Lexington, Kentucky, has a long-running dispute with his girlfriend. Is it appropriate to call the machine that launders your clothing a clothes-washing machine rather than just a washing machine? And why do we call the machine that cleans the dishes a dishwasher rather than a dish-washing machine?

In an earlier conversation, we discussed the term gypsy and its ugly history as a slur against the Roma people. That history prompted the Actors' Equity Association to choose a new name for its traditional Gypsy Robe. For decades, this garment was awarded to the chorus member in a Broadway musical who has the most production credits. However, it's now called the Legacy Robe.

Placer mining is a method of extracting gold from alluvial deposits. You might guess that the word is pronounced with a long a, but used in this context, it's actually a short vowel. The term derives from a Spanish word for that kind of surface, and goes back to the same Latin root that gives us both plaza and place.

Brian in Church Hill, Tennessee, had a band called Smackin' Bejeebus. The latter word, more commonly rendered as Bejesus or Bejeezus, is a mild oath that euphemizes the name Jesus, is often used for emphasis.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Mx101 Ep31: Goth Rock, 10/18/2018

From KUNC & The Colorado Sound | Part of the Music 101 series | 56:59

Music_101_recent_small Bauhaus’ nine-minute 1979 ode to vampires, “Bela Lugosi’s Dead” is widely considered the song that started the Goth Rock music movement with Joy Division were hot on their heels. Along with bands like Siouxsie & The Banshees, The Cure, and Cocteau Twins, the Goth movement took on an (undead) life of its own and became a full-on subculture. This week's Music 101 explores Goth Rock.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR089: OHR Presents: The Buffalo Gals, 10/15/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Buffalo_gals_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, award winning Neo-Bluegrass & Americana acoustic singer-songwriter duo The Buffalo Gals recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these incredibly talented Buffalo Gals.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Kenny Sims performing the traditional song “Butcher’s Boy.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

The Arkansas duo Buffalo Gals is comprised of Melissa Carper on vocals, upright bass & guitar and Rebecca Patek on vocals, fiddle & guitar.  Both women being extraordinary songwriters as well as accomplished musicians, they bring to the stage a range of stories and down home feeling that’ll have your toes tapping and your heart yearning.  Blending a classic Country music & Americana sound with a bit of humor and a decidedly modern sensibility, the Buffalo Gals’ music is at once authentic as well as intimately relatable.  Rebecca Patek’s most recent album “Come up and Meet Me” was named Best Bluegrass Album for 2016, by the Independent Music Association.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Kenny Sims performing the traditional song “Butcher’s Boy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.  The last of a three part series, this episode chronicles the chaotic downfall of an Ozark theme park based on the famous cartoon “Li’l Abner,” created by cartoonist Al Capp.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 18-42: Food Is More Than Calories--The Meaning Of Macaroni In A Refugee Camp, 10/19/2018

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 29:00

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"Food is about kinship. Food is about love. Food is about generosity and hospitality. Food is about cultural identity--and all of those factors were neglected when they were given macaroni."  --Elizabeth Dunn
In this week’s show, we revisit an interview with Elizabeth Dunn, professor of Geography and International Studies at Indiana University. Elizabeth Dunn is also a food scholar. She studies food and immigration.
In a compelling piece in the Iowa Review, called “A Gift from the American People,”
she writes about how food is so much more than a substance that keeps us alive, so much more than mere calories. She reflects on the approach of humanitarian aid organizations that often fail to understand this when providing food aid to displaced people.
Alex Chambers spoke with Elizabeth Dunn in our studio recently. He asked about her experiences working in refugee camps in The Former Soviet Republic of Georgia after ethnic conflict in the breakaway province of South Ossetia.

We also have a tasty idea for fall radishes, from Chef Daniel Orr, and a story about heritage hogs from Harvest Public Media.

 


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio (Series)

Produced by Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

231: Chili Buns and Pickled Bologna: A 4,000 Mile Road Trip Through Appalachia, 10/18/2018

From Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio | Part of the Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio series | 53:58

Msl_radio_logo_cobrand_prx_small Ronni Lundy, author of “Victuals,” eats her way through Appalachia. Also on this week's show: Mark Kurlansky reveals the shocking, often deadly history of milk; we travel to Genoa to uncover the authentic recipe for Pesto Genovese; and Dr. Aaron Carroll talks trans fats and health.

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

443: The Storm After the Storm, 10/27/2018

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | :00

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With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

The Face of Fake News (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

Pic_giant_092616_trump-rally-407x250_small Fake news wasn't invented by the Internet. It has long been used as a way to demonize political opponents. Elizabeth Losh says it's important to look at fake news apart from partisan accusations and recognize that there are fake news stories that appeal to both the left and the right. Plus: In his new book, Stephen Farnsworth traces the evolution of White House news management over the two decades from Bill Clinton and cable to Donald Trump and twitter.  

Are We Alone?

From Philosophy Talk | 53:59

If there is intelligent life beyond Earth, how would that change life ON Earth?

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News that life might exist or have existed on Mars or somewhere else in our universe excites many. But should we really be happy to hear that news? What are the philosophical implications of the possibility of extraterrestrial life? If life can blossom in our own cosmic backyard, then that means that the universe is most likely saturated with life forms. And if that’s the case, why haven’t we found any evidence of other civilizations? Is it because all civilizations are prone to suicidal destruction at a certain point in their development? If so, how might we avoid this fate? The Philosophers search for life with Paul Davies from Arizona State University, author of The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Back to Saturn for Brand New Cassini Science

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

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Our most frequent guest returns with exciting, just-published research enabled by the 20-year mission’s enormous success. Linda Spilker has served as Cassini Project Scientist for 8 years, and was Deputy Project Scientist for the previous 13.  You’ll also get the chance to win Bruce Betts’ great new intro to  astronomy book in this week’s space trivia contest. Learn more at: http://www.planetary.org/multimedia/planetary-radio/show/2018/1017-2018-linda-spilker-cassini-science.html


Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

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Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 10/12/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Lp1_small Living Planet: Plastic Pollution and Us - Plastic: are we addicted? We look at our relationship with plastic pollution — and in the spirit of recycling. We're highlighting some best-ofs from previous coverage and looking at plastic-free living, reloaded.

Tara Austin

From KUMD | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
KUMD

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 181023 11PM: ClassicalWorks (Episode 383), 10/23/2018 11:00 PM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 58:59

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 383)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse LLC

Most recent piece in this series:

1509.3: Jazz With David Basse, 10/19/2018 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse LLC | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 59:53

Jwdb_small Jazz With David Basse

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

Hothouse Earth

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 59:00

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A conversation with Astronomer Royal Martin Rees, environmental policy expert Adil Najam, and social and political theorist Ajay Singh Chaudhary.

We’re closer than we knew to falling off the cliff into climate hell – not just in the Florida Panhandle and our Deep South this week. The UN scientists’ brutal assessment is so simple you can’t forget it: if the world doesn’t get its carbon fumes largely out of the sky by 2030, Space-ship Earth will be toast by 2040. It’s in the toaster now. Twenty-two years left for this beautiful blue planet, unless we master the tech of carbon capture, fast. You are supposed to hear that warning like a howling smoke alarm in your kitchen. Oddly enough, Donald Trump doesn’t hear it at all, though the government measure of carbon in the atmosphere is higher, scarier than the UN figures. Question: can we de-carbonize the sky before we de-carbonize our oil, gas and coal economy?

The UN scientists are trying to scare us about the climate, but first they’re trying to wake us up, in case you slept through Hurricane Michael in Florida this week, the wildfires, the sheared-off glaciers, the crazy weather all the time now. From the steady rise in the Earth’s temperature and its damage, scientists from a hundred nations conclude that the old goal agreed at Paris – to hold the long warming trend under 2 degrees Centigrade – won’t save us. A net warming of 1.5 degrees is enough, they say, to cook our biosphere beyond repair. 2030, 12 years out, is the deadline for a sharp downturn in the measure of carbon in our skies; else 2040 is the point of no return. We are trapped in a hot-house, the UN report spells out – and one bad effect leads to another: melting ice caps, for example, expose open water, those wine-dark seas, which absorb heat that the ice used to reflect away. Capturing carbon will be a technological feat, but tech will not be enough. Planet Earth will still need to redesign land use and energy, transportation and industry, a make-over on a scale with no precedent. “So we must think anew and act anew,” as Lincoln said

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions G42: Dory Previn's Eloquent Sadness & Good Vibes (and Marimbas) from Stefon Harris

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Langdon_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we'll play four songs by the late and great songwriter Dory Previn, who would have turned 93 on October 22nd, including a song from her unfortunately overlooked debut album in 1958, when she was known as Dory Langdon. Her best-known work was her songwriting for the film "Valley Of The Dolls," but some of her later work explored emotional pain and desperation with unmatched eloquence. We also have the latest album from vibraphonist Stefon Harris and the group Blackout, an album called "Sonic Creed,"and new music from busy bassist Christian McBride, a group called Christian McBride's New Jawn (a good Philadelphia word!) Also on this show guitarist Bobby Broom reworking a classic bluesy country hit on his new album Soul Fingers, and a couple of songs from tenor sax player Javon Jackson, from his excellent new album "For You."

promo included: promo-G42

Folk Alley #181018

From WKSU | Part of the Folk Alley series | 01:57:58

Folk Alley host Elena See presents an exciting, eclectic and intelligent mix of the best traditional folk, Americana, contemporary singer/songwriters, and roots music, from the latest releases, classics, and exclusive in-studio Folk Alley Sessions and live concert recordings. Two discreet hours each week. Available as a one- or two-hour program.

Playing
Folk Alley #181018
From
WKSU

Folk_alley_logo_-_tan_matte_240_medium_small This week on Folk Alley, in hour one, some spooky tunes to kick off the Halloween season with music by The Dave Rawlings Machine, Asylum Street Spankers, and Langhorne Slim; new music from Gregory Alan Isakov, Lucy Kaplansky, and Willie Nelson; a 2'fer from Missy Raines' new work, 'Royal Traveller'; and powerful and poignant song addressing gun violence written by Mark Erelli featuring Rosanne Cash, Lori McKenna, Anais Mitchell, etc. All this, plus favorites from Case/lang/Veirs, Martin Sexton, Mavis Staples, and more. 

In hour two, new music from J.P. Harris, Courtney Hartman & Taylor Ashton, Childsplay, Kathy Mattea, and Amy Ray's 'Holler'; also a set from some brothers featuring the Barr, the Avett, and the Brother Brothers; all this plus favorites from Della Mae, Solas, John Hartford, Jeffrey Foucault, and more.