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Playlist: Ideas from PRX

Compiled By: PRX Administrator

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Experience Hispanic Heritage (Series)

Produced by New Visions, New Voices

Latinos are the largest and fastest growing minority group in the country. Though many are recent immigrants, Hispanics have been living in America as far back as the 16th century, even before settlers from England. How has the the American narrative been shaped by Latinos, and how will they continue to shape it? We bring you stories of the Hispanic/Latino American experience, past, present, and future.

Most recent piece in this series:

Grace Flores-Hughes: A Tale of Survival

From New Visions, New Voices | Part of the Experience Hispanic Heritage series | 06:59

Grace_flores-hughes_small In the 1950s, Taft, Texas was a segregated cotton town with a sizeable Mexican-American population, all of whom lived on the South Side of the railroad tracks. It was in a part of the state had a history of Anglo on Mexican violence, including police brutality and lynchings. Ramona Martinez spoke to one woman was born and raised in Taft, Texas, a place where success and upward mobility were not often seen her in community.

Removed: The Realities Of Deportation (Series)

Produced by Fronteras Desk

A Fronteras Desk series about the lives of parents and children -- some are American citizens -- when deportation affects the family.

Most recent piece in this series:

Reuniting Children With Deported Parents Brings Extra Scrutiny

From Fronteras Desk | Part of the Removed: The Realities Of Deportation series | 04:05

Img_1755_t620_small One in four deportees have a U.S. citizen child left behind. As they struggle to prove to U.S. social workers and the courts that they can take care of their children in Mexico, they face numerous hurdles and, some claim, bia s .

StoryCorps: Rogelio Martinez and Lisa Moya King

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:08

Rogelio Martinez talks to his former dance teacher, Lisa Moya King, about how she helped him through abuse at home.

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When Rogelio Martinez was in high school, he had an open period in his schedule. Looking at the list of electives, he decided to enroll in Lisa Moya King’s dance class.

That choice worked out better than Rogelio could have predicted. At the time, he was living with various family members -- his father had been deported and his mother wasn’t in the picture -- and he and was being physically abused at home.

Lisa and Rogelio, now 21, sat down to remember how she helped him through.

Gloria's Secret Cafe

From Rendered | Part of the Destination DIY series | 04:46

Destination DIY producer Alex Johnson has the story of a one-woman restaurant where customers can't help but feel like a part of the family.

9053658479_fa793d5fe2_z_small This feature originally appeared in the You Are An Authority episode of Destination DIY. The full episode is also available on PRX.

Following in Darwin's Footsteps: Two Young Women Scientists Forge Their Futures in the Galapagos

From Veronique LaCapra | 06:34

From PRX's STEM Story Project. What motivates young people to become scientists? Meet Maricruz Jaramillo and Samoa Asigau, two young women scientists from opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, whose professional aspirations have taken them to the Galapagos Islands.

Mari_and_samoa_prx_img_2197_small What motivates young people to become scientists? Meet Maricruz Jaramillo and Samoa Asigau, two young women scientists from opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, whose professional aspirations have taken them to the Galapagos Islands. Science reporter Véronique LaCapra joined Mari and Samoa in the Galapagos, where they are studying a type of malaria that is affecting native bird populations there. "Following in Darwin’s Footsteps" profiles their research and personal journeys into science, and highlights the changing face of scientific research. The Galapagos Islands — Charles Darwin’s inspiration and a touchstone in the history of evolutionary biology — serve as a sound-rich backdrop.

The Soul of Guatemala

From Jesse Dukes | Part of the The Soul of Guatemala series | 30:31

Latin America has been overwhelmingly Catholic for centuries, but that's changing, and Guatemala is leading the way, as Latin America's Evangelical Frontier. The 30-min. version aired on The Story, but there are also segments

1-guatesoul-9824_small Guatemala is Latin America's most Evangelical Country by percentage, approaching half Protestant. The small, mountainous country just south of Mexico is leading Latin America in a thirty-year Evangelical revival.

Part I, Miracle Town begins in Almolonga, a small town in the highlands that Evangelicals call "Miracle Town".  A majority of the town converted to Evangelical Christianity in the 1970's and  shortly after, the town transformed, becoming prosperous and one of Guatemala's leading vegetable producers. Not everybody agrees it was a miracle, however.

Part II, Megachurches explores how Evangelical Protestantism grew in the years following a devestating Earthquake, during Guatemala's Civil War, when the Catholic Church was under-represented. Evangelicals have sinceb ecome a distinct movement within Guatemala; a powerful social and political force. Guatemala City has five  megachurches and a new one is being built by an internationally famous televangelist to accomodate 15,000 congregants. Another famous  in Pastor in Guatemala City is trying to transform Guatemala the same way he thinks the "miracle town" was transformed. Many think this pastor, Dr. Harold Caballeros, is on the way to becoming Guatemala's next President.

This documentary is available as a full 27 minute piece, or split un into 10 minute and 17 minute sections to fit Segments A + B in NPR's Special Programming clock. Versions with and without musical tails available. NOTE: Full (31 minute) version with long ambi and musical files available under "addtional files" below. Also available, ambi and music beds to use with hosting, and a SOC.

Also : This same documentary is available, in abridged form, as three 5-6 minute features. See the Series page for details.

Support provided by The Open Society Foundations
and
The International Reporting Project

Why more Latinos across the Midwest translates to good news for the economy

From Changing Gears | Part of the Changing Gears: Remaking the Manufacturing Belt series | 06:33

Recent census reports show Midwestern cities are shrinking and people are moving out. But one group is actually growing - the Hispanic population. Changing Gears reporter Niala Boodhoo (Ny-la Boo-doo) reports that’s a good thing for our region - and our economy.

Javier_galvez_latinos_small Changing Gears is a public media collaboration between WBEZ, Michigan Radio and Ideastream in Cleveland, exploring the future of the industrial Midwest.

StoryCorps Historias: Ruben Aguilar and Bill Luna

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:01

Ruben Aguilar tells his friend Bill Luna about his family's deportation as part of the Mexican Repatriation Program in 1933.

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In 1933, Ruben Aguilar was deported to Mexico as part of a largely forgotten Mexican Repatriation Program run by the U.S. government.

During the Great Depression, hundreds of thousands of people of Mexican descent were forcibly deported to Mexico without due process. Many, like Ruben, were American citizens.

Ruben had been born in the United States, but his parents were not citizens, and the entire family was deported. Ruben was six years old at the time.

He told his story to his friend Bill Luna.

StoryCorps: Linda Hernandez

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:08

Linda Hernandez remembers growing up as one of the few Latinos in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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Linda Hernandez grew up in Lincoln, Nebraska during the 1960s.

Her father worked for the railroad, and her family was one of the few Latino families in town.

At StoryCorps, Linda recalled how that made school-life difficult.

An Oasis For Date Palms, But Not For Their Workers

From Lisa Morehouse | Part of the After the Gold Rush: The Future of Small Town California series | 07:02

Agricultural explorers, Arabian fantasy agri-tourism, and dangerous work: all about date palms in California's Coachella Valley.

P1030454_small It’s said that date palm trees want their feet in water, and their heads in fire.  It makes sense, then that more than 90% of the dates harvested in the U.S. grow in California’s Eastern Coachella Valley.  Irrigation water’s pumped here from the Colorado River, and summer temperatures can top 120 degrees. Reporter Lisa Morehouse spent some time in the Eastern Coachella Valley this spring, and got curious about the history of dates here, and about the palmeros , palm workers, who tend them.

Dear Santo Toribio

From This Land Press | 06:45

In 2007, Oklahoma passed the toughest anti-immigration bill in the country. House Bill 1804 made it easier to deport people and a felony to give someone without papers a job, a ride, or let them stay overnight in your home.

The law was designed to scare undocumented immigrants, and it did. But a community here in Tulsa--a mostly Mexican congregation of a Catholic church on the east side--saw this as an opportunity. They created a shrine for immigrants from all over America to visit and find hope. Here's the story of that community, in their own words.

26_st In 2007, Oklahoma passed the toughest anti-immigration bill in the country. House Bill 1804 made it easier to deport people and a felony to give someone without papers a job, a ride, or let them stay overnight in your home. The law was designed to scare undocumented immigrants, and it did. But a community here in Tulsa--a mostly Mexican congregation of a Catholic church on the east side--saw this as an opportunity. They created a shrine for immigrants from all over America to visit and find hope. Here's the story of that community, in their own words.

Mother

From Littleglobe | 03:31

In his honest and heart-wrenching piece, Lee's strong love for his mother parallels his strong yearning to be understood and accepted in her eyes.

Playing
Mother
From
Littleglobe

Mom-heart_small Lee Jiminez is discovering who he is: a gay, atheist who loves his mother deeply. Lee's greatest wish is that she can continue to love him for exactly who he is. 

Transgender Activist Works to Help LGBT Latinos

From Lauren Ober | 05:12

Since immigrating to Washington, D.C. from El Salvador as a teenager, Ruby Corado has had big dreams. But as a transgender Latina, it hasn’t always been easy to achieve those. Still, Corado, who runs Casa Ruby, a multicultural center for LGBT people, won’t be deterred. The Latino LGBT community has specific needs from immigration to jobs that she's working to address. Plus, she's on track to open the first LGBT homeless shelter in the District. This piece first aired on WAMU's Metro Connection on Sept. 13, 2013.

07 Since immigrating to Washington, D.C. from El Salvador as a teenager, Ruby Corado has had big dreams. But as a transgender Latina, it hasn’t always been easy to achieve those. Still, Corado, who runs Casa Ruby, a multicultural center for LGBT people, won’t be deterred. The Latino LGBT community has specific needs from immigration to jobs that she's working to address. Plus, she's on track to open the first LGBT homeless shelter in the District. This piece first aired on WAMU's Metro Connection on Sept. 13, 2013.

Blending of cultures may be blueprint for growth

From Harvest Public Media Group | Part of the Farmer of the Future series | 05:26

While some of the rural Midwest is hollowing out, regions like Sioux County, Iowa, are actually growing, thanks largely to immigrant populations moving in to take jobs that employers otherwise cannot fill. Melding cultures is never easy, but in communities like Sioux County, Latinos are slowly making the Midwest their home.

2012_dairy_farm_045_small

Who is the farmer of the future?

That’s the question being posed by Harvest Public Media in a weeklong series that explores how demographic, technological and cultural forces will shape America’s food producers into the next decade and beyond.

We begin with a story from Kathleen Masterson, who reports that while much of the rural Midwest is hollowing out – some small regions are actually GROWING, largely due to immigration populations taking ag-related jobs that otherwise employers cannot fill. Melding cultures is never easy, but in communities like Sioux County, Iowa… there's a mutual reliance… and slowly members of the Latino community are changing the landscape of the rural Midwest.

Full Story:

Who is the farmer of the future?

That’s the question being posed by Harvest Public Media in a weeklong series that explores how demographic, technological and cultural forces will shape America’s food producers into the next decade and beyond.

We begin with a story from Kathleen Masterson, who reports that while much of the rural Midwest is hollowing out – some small regions are actually GROWING, largely due to immigration populations taking ag-related jobs that otherwise employers cannot fill. Melding cultures is never easy, but in communities like Sioux County, Iowa… there's a mutual reliance… and slowly members of the Latino community are changing the landscape of the rural Midwest.

OPEN---

This corner of northwest Iowa is known for its Dutch pastries; the landscape is dotted with Lutheran and reform churches. But now, Catholic churches and tortillerias are creeping into the landscape … signs of the new residents joining this vibrant community.

Terry van Maanen runs Winding Meadows dairy in Sioux County Iowa. He bought the family farm from his father in the 80s. His farm itself is indicative of how much the region has changed in the last few decades:

Windingmeadows-dairy-SCENE (10) :

MEX MUSIC… Km: is this the end of shift? Martin: Me no speak English -- TVM: check your spanish out talking to Martin...

The workers are cleaning out the milking parlor before bringing in the next batch of cows. Van Maanen explains the 600-cow operation runs 24 hours a day, every day of the week-- even on Christmas .

Vanmannen2 (06)-- I mean you get people apply for a job here, and 'Oh, weekends and nights?' -- oh, no, not interested…

Van Maanen says about TWO THIRDS (7/11) of his workers are Latino.

Vanmaanen1 (19) : I honestly think I could not run my business if all these, the guys that are working for me, were to leave and I had to fill them with non-Hispanic help. I think I'd have to close the door. (laughs) It would be tough.

Some of Van Maanen's staff, Anglo and Latino, have been with him over 10 years. He says everyone gets along well in the workplace, even though not all employees speak English.

But when it comes to mixing outside of work -- Van Maanen says the Anglo and Latino cultures have been slower to SOCIALIZE. (17)

Vanmaanen3 (13) -- The schools, I think, kinda brings everybody together, when their families have kids that go to the community school, I think it gives us a common entity to circle around.

Latino children make up about 20 percent of the classrooms in Sioux Center and nearby towns. Overall, the town’s population has grown 17 percent -- and the county is up 7 percent over the last decade. Meanwhile most of rural Iowa is LOSING people…91 of Iowa’s 99 counties have declined by about 9 percent over the last three decades.

So it's not just about labor -- if Sioux County is any indication -- for some Midwestern communities, immigrant populations could be an important part of keeping rural culture alive.

Back in the milking parlor at Winding Meadows Dairy, there's the whirring of the giant pumps moving milk out to stainless steel tank (NAT SOUND)

Luis Campos , the parlor manager, says he came to the US illegally but he married a US citizen and got his papers. Still it took him a while to adjust to Iowa:

Luis2 (21)- At first, yeah it's too hard for me. Especially when I was single, but now I got a kids-- my kids now they like here. They born here. In America. The schools in here is better, you know, everything is better here.

When I asked if felt comfortable in the culture, Campos said now he considers himself: (04)

Luis2b (08): I am, most, maybe half and half. Half mine and half like you guys.

As far as community involvement -- Campos is really involved. But mostly in the Latino community: he leads the Mexican totonaca dancing at a local catholic church, and teaches Sunday school to kindergarteners.

Enrique Luevano also really likes living in Iowa. Originally from Mexico, he's lived here for 15 years now, and worked his way up to a supervisor at the pork processing plant Natural Food Holdings. He says Latino and Anglo cultures are still fairly separate.

Enrique2 (15) -- We respect each other, that's what is nice about here, you don't hear about people fighting because of the color of their skin. Here everybody minds their own business, and away we go.

Luevano is now a legal resident. BUT MANY others LIVE IN constant fear, community advocates say. They've established families and lives here, but if they're pulled over coming back from the grocery store, they could be deported within days.

Still there are signs Latinos are making a home here. There are bilingual churches, local volunteers teach English night classes, and law enforcement has had training on working in a diverse community.

And these new residents are an important part of the community -- and its future, says Gary Malenke, the president of the Natural Food Holdings pork processing plant.

Gary 1 (12): Misconception I think that people have is that, I think people believe that oh, these immigrants are stealing all these jobs-- we don't see that here, ok, we just don't.

Malenke says there's a real need for laborers --in dairies, hog confinements, poultry farms and general construction, too.

Not only are immigrants helping buoy the farm economy, but their children are American citizens -- they're part of church communities and schools and sports teams.

Malenke2 (19)-- There's a lot of progress in these communities, I mean in Sioux Center they're going to build a hospital, a $48 million dollar hospital, not just a hospital. And that's the kind of things that are happening in these communities, which, face it, that tells you that businesses are doing well.

And when communities do well – it gives everybody options. The kids of these immigrant workers – just like other rural kids in the Midwest, are not all going into farm work. Some want to be doctors, teachers and business owners. And just like generations before -- because of their parents' hard work, they'll have that opportunity.

I'm Kathleen Masterson, HPM.

Juan's Diary, Part 2: Back to Mexico

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Teenage Diaries series | 25:51

In Juan’s second audio diary, he travels back to Mexico to visit his dying grandfather. This is his first time back since he immigrated to the United States.

“I search in my pockets and I find, you know, some money and I say, ‘Well, you know, now I can help out, you know.’ And he just laugh. And I say, ‘Why are you laughing?’ He says, ‘Well, I never expect you to give me some money, ’cause it’s like it was yesterday when you were a kid, and everything.’ And then, I still remember the smile on his face. He kept saying that he was proud of me. He was proud, you know?”

Juan first recorded his audio diary with us 16 years ago. In a recent podcast, we hear from Juan today as he reflects back on his life now and the past 16 years.

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series produced by Radio Diaries for NPR.

Td_juan_003_l_small

In Juan’s second audio diary, he travels back to Mexico to visit his dying grandfather. This is his first time back since he immigrated to the United States.

“I search in my pockets and I find, you know, some money and I say, ‘Well, you know, now I can help out, you know.’ And he just laugh. And I say, ‘Why are you laughing?’ He says, ‘Well, I never expect you to give me some money, ’cause it’s like it was yesterday when you were a kid, and everything.’ And then, I still remember the smile on his face. He kept saying that he was proud of me. He was proud, you know?”

This story is part of the  Teenage Diaries series  produced by Radio Diaries for NPR. Since 1996, Executive Producer Joe Richman has been giving tape recorders to young people around the country to document their lives. In December of 2012, Radio Diaries will revisit five of the original diarists 16 years after their first recordings. The series airs on NPR’s  All Things Considered  

 

Neither Stranger, Friend nor Enemy

From Jamie Dell'Apa | 03:27

Anthony Garza has an appearance that seems to mirror everyone's expectation of him. Middle Easterners, Americans and Hispanics strangers enjoy picking him out of the crowd and acknowledging his presence as "one of us." With Anthony's multi-lingual and multi-cultural background, he reciprocates their acknowledgement and the union of strangers becomes a playful celebration of cultures and diversity.

And yet, the human spirit is easily trumped. Crushed by distant events completely unrelated to Anthony and his newfound friends. Where fiction destroys facts the human spirits withers.

Default-piece-image-1 Anthony Garza has an appearance that seems to mirror everyone's expectation of him. Middle Easterners, Americans and Hispanics strangers enjoy picking him out of the crowd and acknowledging his presence as "one of us." With Anthony's multi-lingual and multi-cultural background, he reciprocates their acknowledgement and the union of strangers becomes a playful celebration of cultures and diversity. And yet, the human spirit is easily trumped. Crushed by distant events completely unrelated to Anthony and his newfound friends. Where fiction destroys facts the human spirits withers.

Family Tree

From Littleglobe | 06:08

"Family Tree" is a short piece written and produced by Andres Ortiz. His piece is a journey into Ortiz's unknown family history. Growing up being told by all that his family is Hispanic, Andres finds out how important and fulfilling it is to know the complexities of our family backgrounds and histories.

Playing
Family Tree
From
Littleglobe

3342886775_e636fa5d5e_m_small "Family Tree" is a short piece written and produced by Andres Ortiz. He is a junior at Pojoaque Valley High School and created "Family Tree" during Youth Media Project's Summer Intensive at the Santa Fe Art Institute. His piece is a journey into Ortiz's unknown family history.   Growing up being told by all that his family is Hispanic, Andres finds out how important and fulfilling it is to know the complexities of our family backgrounds and histories.

Fidel Castro 1959: the Lost Interview

From Blank on Blank | Part of the Blank on Blank series | 08:55

"If this Revolution falls, what we will have here in Cuba is a hell. Hell itself." - Fidel Castro in 1959. Havana.

Fidel_castro_square2_small A few years ago Laura Galloway uncovered a tape in her late grandfather's archives that simply said "Galloway/Castro." It was a lost recording made in 1959 by Clark Hewitt Galloway, then an editor for U.S. News and World Report. This is the story of a tape that's never been heard before--and a moment in time when a young Fidel Castro speaks about a future for Cuba just weeks after the overthrow of Batista. 

Old School DIY

From Rendered | Part of the Destination DIY series | 59:00

Before it was called DIY or even “do it yourself,” self-sufficiency had value. Our parents and grandparents called it “making do.” This episode explores the roots of DIY. It features the voices of elders (including Julie's grandparents) as well as zinesters, ham radio enthusiasts, badass quilters, urban foragers, and more!

Playing
Old School DIY
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Rendered

Make-do-mend1_small

Host name: Julie Sabatier (suh-BAH-tee-ay)  

Segment A: Julie's grandmother and other senior citizens talk about the value of "making do," producer Jaymee Cuti traces the roots of the phrase "do it yourself," and we hear about the revival of what some are calling "the punk rock of choral music."

Segment B: Rebecca Lerner, author of Dandelion Hunter, discusses urban foraging and amateur radio operators or "hams" talk morse code and emergency preparedness.

Segment C: Latinas learning English in California's Anderson Valley use fabric to explore complex social issues, Julie takes a look at the staying power of zines, and producer Marlon Bishop looks back at a radical, alternative school started by New York City teenagers in the 1970s. 

Who is that masked man?

From KFAI | Part of the 10,000 Fresh Voices series | 04:32

Have you ever dreamed of being someone else? At this year’s Northern Spark, one local artist is offering you the chance to become a Mexican wrestling superhero. KFAI’s Todd Melby has the story.

Mask_small Have you ever dreamed of being someone else? At this year’s Northern Spark, one local artist is offering you the chance to become a Mexican wrestling superhero. KFAI’s Todd Melby has the story.

Dear Father

From Littleglobe | 02:40

Gabriel Martinez, a seventh grader, wrote this thoughtful and moving letter to his unknown father.

Playing
Dear Father
From
Littleglobe

2907198746_f076efdd17_z_small Gabriel Martinez, a seventh grader, wrote this thoughtful and moving letter to his unknown father.

Las Hermanitas Garza

From Stories from Deep in the Heart, a project of Texas Folklife | 03:37

The story of one family and many generations of women in Conjunto music. Produced by Stories Summer Institute youth reporters Arlette Flores, Jennifer Gonzales, Roberto Hernandez, and Steven Ugalde, in conjunction with the Austin Music Map, Localore, and KUT 90.5.

Listening_partyexport The story of one family and many generations of women in Conjunto music. Produced by Stories Summer Institute youth reporters Arlette Flores, Jennifer Gonzales, Roberto Hernandez, and Steven Ugalde, in conjunction with the Austin Music Map, Localore, and KUT 90.5.

Coming of age "illegal"

From MPR News Stations | Part of the MPR News' Youth Series series | 06:55

When Brenda was 7, she was carried across the border from Mexico. Now 19, the Minneapolis teen wishes she could live and work legally in the country she considers home.

Brenda20710_x240_small In this story, Brenda* takes listeners inside her life as an "illegal immigrant" growing up in the United States. Brenda interviews her mother about why she brought her here, records an audio diary about her frustration with the slow pace of immigration reform, and meets with a teacher who encourages her to come back and finish high school even though her prospects for future employment are uncertain.

*MPR News agreed not to use her last name because she fears deportation

Watching My Cousin Sink Into Gang Life

From Curie Youth Radio | 04:32

A teenager charts her beloved cousin's path toward gang life

Twosix_small This story is not about what it's like to join a gang. Instead, it explores what it's like to be left behind. Curie Youth Radio is a writing and radio production class at Curie High School on Chicago?s Southwest side. Here, students create their own stories: fresh takes on everything from snowball fights to gang warfare. They see their stories as a way for teenagers in one Chicago high school to reach out to the rest of the world.

La Oportunidad, by Victoria Campos of the University of Texas

From YouthCast | 13:58

Maria Isabel wasn't supposed to finish the 6th grade. She lived in a tiny mountain ranch in Mexico, where girls stayed home to cook and raise children. If her father had had his way, that's exactly what she would have done.

Campos_small

Instead, Maria Isabel went to a private high school, moved to the United States, and got a college degree. Now, she's a registered nurse living a comfortable life in Texas, where her daughter is studying radio, TV and film at the University of Texas. Her daughter Victoria Campos, that is — the featured producer of this week's Youthcast.

This story is like a three-layer-cake labor of love. Layer one: Victoria is interviewing her mom, whom Victoria describes as "such an inspirational figure in my life." Layer two: Victoria's mom is sharing an intimate story about two strangers who became very dear to her heart. And finally, layer three: it was while recording and editing this piece that Victoria fell in love with making radio. She told me, "I would go to the studio at 1pm and come out at 9pm and not even realize I had spent that much time in there. Throughout the process of editing this story, I realized that I was doing something I really loved."

See the blogpost and podcast at www.youthcast.org

Navajo Taco Adapted As The People Did

From Anne Hoffman | 02:45

On the Navajo Nation, tacos lose the tortilla and take on fry bread. This summer, a group of teenagers visited a Navajo farm to learn the art of Navajo tacos.

Screen_shot_2013-11-17_at_11 On the Navajo Nation, tacos lose the tortilla and take on fry bread. This summer, a group of teenagers visited a Navajo farm to learn the art of Navajo tacos.

Tamales y Bicicletas

From KFAI | Part of the 10,000 Fresh Voices series | 05:00

South Minneapolis-based Tamales y Bicicletas educates mostly Latino youth about healthy eating and exercise, with a focus on food justice. Their approach explores race, immigration and social justice, and as KFAI producer Allison Herrera explains, they're doing it one tamale at a time.

Playing
Tamales y Bicicletas
From
KFAI

Tamales1_small South Minneapolis-based Tamales y Bicicletas educates mostly Latino youth about healthy eating and exercise, with a focus on food justice. Their approach explores race, immigration and social justice, and as KFAI producer Allison Herrera explains, they're doing it one tamale at a time.