%s1 / %s2

Playlist: 1 Hour Specials (Comm. Air, Misc.)

Compiled By: Brian Bovenizer

Caption: PRX default Playlist image
No text

A Change of World

From The Poetry Foundation | 59:00

Meryl Streep narrates an hour-long documentary special about how the Women’s Movement changed poetry, and how women poets changed the culture.

New-_change_of_world_square-2_small

"A Change of World" tells the story of how poets who were swept up in the Women’s Movement of the 1960s and 70s radically changed American poetry. As poet Alicia Ostriker says, "For the first time in the history of writing, which is about 4000 years or so, women could write without fear, without constantly looking over their shoulder to see if they were going to be approved of by men.” How did this come about?

Betty Friedan’s “The Feminine Mystique” was a primary catalyst of The Women’s Movement. In poetry, it was Sylvia Plath’s posthumous book “Ariel,” which electrified a generation of women poets. We’ll hear from Plath herself and from women poets who were coming up during the 1960s. We’ll also hear about the radical sexual and psychological candor of Plath’s friend, Anne Sexton.

By the 1970s women poets were publishing a huge variety of poetry that simply was not imaginable a decade earlier. Yet they still didn’t have mainstream literary approval. When Adrienne Rich won the National Book Award for Poetry in 1974, she accepted on behalf of her fellow nominees Audre Lorde and Alice Walker. This was a watershed moment. As Honor Moore says, :It was shocking. Feminism had no standing in the culture.  It was courageous in the sense that none of these three poets would ever be accepted or considered in the same way again.”

In the face of continuing sexism in the literary establishment, women poets began forming their own informal communities, with readings, magazines, bookstores, workshops and mentorships. We’ll hear about this movement from poets who participated, like Sharon Olds, Judy Grahn, Sonia Sanchez, Susan Griffin, as well as archival audio from some of the leading poets of the time. 

Border Radio: The Big Jukebox in the Sky

From Texas Folklife | 58:56

An hour-long music special on the story of Border Radio. Toe tapping music from hillbilly, western swing, Mexican conjunto and contemporary, rhythm and blues, and good ole rock and roll.

Borderradioimage_small Border Radio: The Great Big Jukebox in the Sky: (Stereo) An hour-long music special on the story of Border Radio. Lots of good toe tapping music from hillbilly, western swing, Mexican conjunto and contemporary, rhythm and blues, and good ole rock and roll. Between the 1930s through the 1960s, mega-watt "border blaster" stations set up just across the Mexican border to evade U.S. broadcast regulations, and beamed programming across the United States and as far away as Europe. For the first time, American listeners heard ?race music,? rhythm and blues, and a diverse span of music from ?hillbilly? to gospel that carried the voices and sounds of Mexico and the Southwest to a vast audience. The first in a series of taped-for-radio specials, Border Radio: The Big Juke Box in the Sky features Texas musicians, including Rick Trevi?o from Grammy-winning Los Super Seven; Austin?s own blues diva, Miss Lavelle White; rock and roller Joe King Carrasco; traditional conjunto from South Texas; and contemporary Tex-Mex rocker, Patricia Vonne. Border Radio?s most famous dee-jay, Wolfman Jack, makes a fictional dramatic appearance. Other special guests on Border Radio include Dallas ?Nevada Slim? Turner, one of border radio?s original cowboy singers and pitchmen, and a surprise appearance by Kinky Friedman, humorist and wildcard gubernatorial candidate for Texas in 2006. Border Radio: the Great Big Jukebox in the Sky is produced for radio by Ginger Miles, and executive-produced by Texas Folklife, made possible in part by a grant from National Endowment for the Arts.

Five Farms, Episode One: Planting

From The Center for Documentary Studies | Part of the Five Farms: Stories from American Farm Families series | 54:00

Spring planting on the family farm is the time of the annual gamble --- on the alchemies of nature, on the health of livestock, on future fall harvest market prices. Planting introduces five families who are among the 1 percent of Americans who live and work on farms: the Griffieons of Iowa; the Pecusas of Hopi, Arizona; the Mains of northern California; the Wises of North Carolina; and the Hagers of western Massachusetts.

Ff-img-craig-smaller_small Spring planting on the family farm is the time of the annual gamble --- on the alchemies of nature, on the health of livestock, on future fall harvest market prices. Planting introduces five families who are among the 1 percent of Americans who live and work on farms: the Griffieons of Iowa; the Pecusas of Hopi, Arizona; the Mains of northern California; the Wises of North Carolina; and the Hagers of western Massachusetts.

YBYG177: You Bet Your Garden # 77 Spiderman-GOOD Spider Mites-BAD, 3/18/2020

From You Bet Your Garden | Part of the You Bet Your Garden series | 54:58

On the Question of the week Mike McGrath takes on the infamous pest, "Spider Mites" . And takes on your fabulous phone calls!

Ybyg-sp-p_small On the Question of the week Mike McGrath takes on the infamous pest, "Spider Mites" . And takes on your fabulous phone calls!

Mystery Monday

From William Taylor | Part of the Mystrey Monday series | 56:58

Mystery Monday is a series of one hour program that features vintage radio mystery programs from the 1930's through the 1950's.

Secondtime1_small

Mystery Monday is a one hour program that features two different vintage radio mystery programs on each release. The majority of the vintage programs come from the mid 1930s through the War Years.  Some of our programs do feature mysteries from the late 40's and early 50's.
Due to the type of progamming in the 30's and 40's Mystery Monday runs between 55 and 60 minutes.