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Playlist: To license

Compiled By: Louisville Public Media

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The Protest Singer: An Intimate Portrait of Pete Seeger

From Media Mechanics | 53:59

An exclusive interview with Pete Seeger, who turns 90 in May. (May 3rd) Program is relatively undated, referencing that Pete turns 90 "this year." Free to stations.

Pete-seeger-1_small Celebrate the 90th birthday of American icon Pete Seeger Sunday, May 3rd, with this hour-long special. In a brand new exclusive interview, Pete discusses his career, the view from 90, how music can still change the world, and his new book The Protest Singer. The book's author, The New Yorker's Alec Wilkinson, offers insights into the remarkable career of this national treasure - a man who took on red-baiters, racists, war-mongers, and polluters. There's plenty of 
music, too. Hosted by Rita Houston. Program is undated such that it can run well after May 3rd.

This is expected to be Pete Seeger's only radio interview in support of the book. Air window opens Friday, May 1.



We Shall Remain One-Hour Special

From Native Public Media | Part of the We Shall Remain series | 59:02

The one-hour special from the We Shall Remain Radio Project complements the recently aired five-part television special from PBS's American Experience, exploring the Native American perspective on pivotal moments in U.S. history from the Native American perspective.

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A compilation of the five 5-minute features, plus

Warrior Tradition, a bonus feature from Brian Bull, and

 Native American Media Leaders, how Tribal Radio Stations are serving their communities

The Wire (Series)

Produced by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Most recent piece in this series:

The Wire Episode 8: The Digital Democracy of Sound

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the The Wire series | 52:55

Thewire8_small Digital technology has changed how we find, how we make and how we listen to music. Sometimes it's easier to get a hold of your favourite track than it is to get a good cup of coffee. Sounds are sampled, mmixed, and shared on a scale that eclipses our wildest dreams from even a decade ago. This has created wonderful and terrible consequences, opening the door to pirates but also to a new world of music - the fourth world, where anything is possible.

News 2.0: The Future of News in the Age of Social Media- Part One

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the The Future of News in an Age of Social Media series | 52:14

Two one-hour CBC Radio programs about changes to our understanding of 'journalism' now that anyone can create, report and publish news.

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For more than a hundred years, the tools of journalistic production – the ability to report, photograph and record events and distribute that material to a mass audience – have resided in the hands of a small group of people who, by convention and by law, have been called journalists.

But in this 21st century the tools of production now belong to just about everyone. Thanks to "Web 2.0" technology – blogs, wikis, social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter and video sharing sites like YouTube – billions of people can transmit text, photos, and video instantly to a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. The tools of journalism are no longer the exclusive preserve of journalists.

Web 2.0 has made the creation of highly interactive online communities both easy and inexpensive. And these online communities have become important reference points in many people's lives, often replacing more traditional sources of influence, including journalists.

What is now called the "mainstream media" has lost its control over the tools of its trade, and its importance as a centre of social and political influence. The business and philosophical model both appear to be broken, perhaps irrevocably.

There is much to celebrate about this democratization of the media, but there are also reasons to be concerned about the loss of an independent, professional journalistic filter at a time when everyone can be their own media. Can online communities of "citizen journalists" be counted on to help us make informed choices as citizens and consumers? What's lost, and what's gained when "News 1.0" gives way to "News 2.0?"

News 2.0: The Future of News in an Age of Social Media- Part Two

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the The Future of News in an Age of Social Media series | 53:07

Two one-hour CBC Radio programs about changes to our understanding of 'journalism' now that anyone can create, report and publish news.

Ireport-clarenceny-plane-crash_small

For more than a hundred years, the tools of journalistic production – the ability to report, photograph and record events and distribute that material to a mass audience – have resided in the hands of a small group of people who, by convention and by law, have been called journalists.

But in this 21st century the tools of production now belong to just about everyone. Thanks to "Web 2.0" technology – blogs, wikis, social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter and video sharing sites like YouTube – billions of people can transmit text, photos, and video instantly to a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. The tools of journalism are no longer the exclusive preserve of journalists.

Web 2.0 has made the creation of highly interactive online communities both easy and inexpensive. And these online communities have become important reference points in many people's lives, often replacing more traditional sources of influence, including journalists.

What is now called the "mainstream media" has lost its control over the tools of its trade, and its importance as a centre of social and political influence. The business and philosophical model both appear to be broken, perhaps irrevocably.

There is much to celebrate about this democratization of the media, but there are also reasons to be concerned about the loss of an independent, professional journalistic filter at a time when everyone can be their own media. Can online communities of "citizen journalists" be counted on to help us make informed choices as citizens and consumers? What's lost, and what's gained when "News 1.0" gives way to "News 2.0?"

States of Marriage

From Vermont Public Radio | 52:00

Hour-long newscast compatible program examines the last decade of significant change in marriage rights for same-sex couples. This news documentary covers the politics legalities and advocacy efforts in various states, with particular attention to Vermont, Massachusetts, California, Iowa and Maine.

States-of-marriage-300x300_small Same-sex marriage is one of the more controversial issues of our time. States Of Marriage: The Debate Over Gay Rights provides meaning and context not only to Vermont's history with this issue, but tells the national story as well.

Ten years ago in December, the Vermont Supreme Court changed the landscape of legal rights for same-sex couples when it handed down its ruling in the case Baker v. State of Vermont. The three same-sex couples who were the Baker plaintiffs had argued that they deserve the rights of marriage, just as heterosexual couples do. 

In the decade since, the country has debated the deeply personal and very public questions of what marriage means and how to legally recognize gay and lesbian couples, and how ideas of family and civil rights are challenged by these questions. 

States of Marriage examines how several states have approached legal recognition for gay and lesbian couples. We examine the divisive civil unions precedent in Vermont and how it set the stage for a marriage law in Massachusetts. Advocates on both sides of the issue explain their political and legal strategies to convince voters and courts of their cause, and we see the results of that debate in California, Iowa and Maine.


King's Last March

From American Public Media | Part of the American RadioWorks: Black History series | 59:00

Although it was one of the most challenging and controversial chapters of his career, the final year of King's life has not been the focus of significant public attention. This dramatic and illuminating documentary uses a rich mix of archival tape, oral histories and contemporary interviews to paint a vivid picture of what may have been the most difficult year of Dr. King's life.

Img073_small On April 4th, 1967 Martin Luther King, Jr. gave a landmark speech from the pulpit of Riverside Church in New York. He called for an end to the Vietnam War. Exactly one year later, King was assassinated in Memphis. He was 39 years old. King’s speech in New York set the tone for the last year of his life. Inside the church, he was hailed for his brave, outspoken stance against the war. Outside the church, he was roundly condemned – by the mainstream press, by other civil rights activists and, most decidedly, by President Lyndon Johnson.

This documentary traces the final year of King’s life. It was one of the most challenging and controversial chapters of the civil rights leader’s career, yet it has not been the focus of significant public attention. For many, the image of King is of a social and political leader at the height of his powers – especially the period up through 1965.But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

This program illuminates the profound personal, psychological and philosophical challenges King faced in his last year. In this time, King tried to gain support for his Poor People’s Campaign, fended off fierce critics inside and outside the civil rights movement, and endured an increasing sense of despair and isolation. King's Last March offers listeners a complex view of a man trying to push his philosophy of non-violence to a conclusion many people found more threatening than the dream he described on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial five years before his death.

American RadioWorks: Black History (Series)

Produced by American Public Media

Most recent piece in this series:

State of Siege: Mississippi Whites and the Civil Rights Movement

From American Public Media | Part of the American RadioWorks: Black History series | 59:00

State_of_siege_promo_image_prx_small Mississippi occupies a distinct and dramatic place in the history of America’s civil rights movement. No state in the South was more resistant to the struggle for black equality. No place was more violent. While the history of civil rights activists has been well documented in radio and television, the stories and strategies of their white opponents are less well known.

Using newly discovered archival audio, along with oral histories and contemporary interviews, State of Siege brings to light the extraordinary tactics whites in Mississippi used to battle integration. Their strategies ranged from organizing a massive network of citizens councils to promote white supremacy, to establishing a state-run spy agency to disrupt civil rights activism.

The program also traces the rise of the Ku Klux Klan, and illuminates the way whites came to both accommodate and defy the mandates of civil rights legislation in the mid-1960s. Ultimately, what happened during the civil rights era in Mississippi had a profound and lasting impact on American politics to the present day.

Afghanistan's Other War

From Vermont Public Radio | 28:30

A half-hour documentary that examines the challenging counter-insurgency mission of the National Guard and how the Guard is training the Afghan Police.

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The war in Afghanistan is no longer solely a fight against insurgents. In fact, training the country's security forces and building relationships are now central to the U.S. military's mission in Afghanistan and critical to any plans to withdraw troops. That means soldiers have had to adjust to a new role where the tools are words, not weapons.  Vermont Public Radio Reporter Steve Zind spent three weeks with National Guard soldiers in Afghanistan this fall. In this documentary, he takes us on patrols and to police training sessions to learn how soldiers carried out their complex mission and how they view the prospects for success.