Science Update

Series produced by Science Update

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Science Update is a daily, 60-second feature covering the latest science news in a fun, accessible style. This multi-award winning show has been on the air nationally since January of 1988.

Science Update is a 60-second news feature that provides your listeners with their minimum daily requirement of science every weekday. Science Update covers science, engineering, medicine-- everything from aardarks to zygotes and, on rare occasions, aardvark zygotes. We post the five shows for each week on the Thursday afternoon of the week before so you can get them in your system, ready to go. Every package, including a short tease, is exactly 60 seconds, so you can wrap it around a 30 second station id or funder blurb and have it fit nicely into your clock. In addition to news, we also answer listeners' questions, phoned into our toll-free line 1-800-WHY-ISIT (4748) or emailed to us from our website, www.scienceupdate.com


117 Pieces

Order by: Newest First | Oldest First
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Tiny orange frogs called pumpkin toadlets can’t hear their own calls.

Bought by WTIP and KENW


  • Added: Oct 01, 2017
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 2
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Being the “right-size” helps protect species from extinction.

Bought by KENW


  • Added: Sep 19, 2017
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 1
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What predicts a puppy’s later success as a guide dog?

Bought by KENW and WLPR


  • Added: Aug 11, 2017
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 2
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A genetic difference between the two types of whales that could partially explain why some became so gigantic.

Bought by WTIP, KENW, and WLPR


  • Added: Jul 29, 2017
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 3
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A social upbringing can offset the activity of a mouse’s attack circuit.

Bought by KENW and WLPR


  • Added: Jul 29, 2017
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 2
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Water for the world’s most arid regions could come right out of the air.

  • Added: Dec 23, 2017
  • Length: 01:00
Caption: Researcher Jorg Massen with hand-raised ravens., Credit:  (Photo courtesy of Jorg Massen)
Ravens, like humans, remember who has treated them fairly.

  • Added: Dec 23, 2017
  • Length: 01:00
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Studying tardigrades’ DNA to learn what makes them so tough.

Bought by KENW


  • Added: Jul 29, 2017
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 1
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An animal welfare researcher calls the study of the biological basis of boredom in animals.

Bought by KENW and WLPR


  • Added: Jul 29, 2017
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 2
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Communicating about science through comics.

Bought by Spokane Public Radio, KENW, and WLPR


  • Added: Jul 02, 2017
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 3
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Researchers discover that cockatoos use sticks and seed pods to drum out rhythms on tree limbs.

Bought by WTIP, KENW, and WLPR


  • Added: Jul 02, 2017
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 3
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Songbirds, like people, may need to warm up their voices before they sing.

Bought by KSFR, WLPR, Radio Baha'i, WLGI, and KENW


  • Added: Feb 06, 2017
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 4
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The brain architecture for processing sound is the same in deaf people as in hearing people.

Bought by KSFR, KENW, Radio Baha'i, WLGI, and WLPR


  • Added: Nov 27, 2016
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 4
Caption: Huntington Beach, 1926, Credit:  Photo Courtesy of the Orange County Archives Barbara K. Milkovich Collection CC BY 2.0, via flickr
Did early 20th century oil wells in southern California trigger major earthquakes?

Bought by KSFR, KENW, Radio Baha'i, WLGI, and WLPR


  • Added: Nov 05, 2016
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 4
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Domestic goats learn to do a challenging task by watching humans do it first.

Bought by KSFR, WLPR, and Radio Baha'i, WLGI


  • Added: Oct 17, 2016
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 3
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Female house wrens sing to defend their nest sites from intruders.

Bought by KSFR, Radio Baha'i, WLGI, KENW, and WLPR


  • Added: Feb 19, 2016
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 4
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You can thank fruit flies for your favorite wine’s fruity “nose”.

Bought by KSFR, Radio Baha'i, WLGI, KENW, and WLPR


  • Added: Nov 23, 2015
  • Length: 01:00
  • Purchases: 4