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Playlist: Nellie Gilles's Portfolio

 Credit:

Nellie Gilles is a producer at Radio Diaries. Her work has been heard on NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition and the Radio Diaries Podcast.

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Last Witness: Surviving the Tulsa Race Riot

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Last Witness series | 06:20

On May 31, 1921, Olivia Hooker was six-years-old when white mobs launched an attack on the Greenwood section of Tulsa, Oklahoma. In less than 24 hours, the mobs destroyed more than 1,000 homes and businesses. It’s estimated as many as 300 people were killed. The Tulsa Race Riot is considered one of the worst incidents of racial violence in American history.

Olivia_hooker_then_square_small On May 31, 1921, Olivia Hooker was six-years-old when white mobs launched an attack on the Greenwood section of Tulsa, Oklahoma. In less than 24 hours, the mobs destroyed more than 1,000 homes and businesses. It’s estimated as many as 300 people were killed. The Tulsa Race Riot is considered one of the worst incidents of racial violence in American history. This story is part of our ongoing series Last Witness. 

The Story of Jane

From Radio Diaries | 11:59

In 1965, an underground network formed in Chicago to help pregnant women get abortions. At first, they connected women with doctors willing to break the law to perform the procedure. Eventually, they were trained and began performing abortions themselves. The group called itself “Jane.” Over the years, Jane performed more than 11,000 first and second trimester abortions.

Jane_advertisement_square_small In 1965, an underground network formed in Chicago to help pregnant women get abortions. At first, they connected women with doctors willing to break the law to perform the procedure. Eventually, they were trained and began performing abortions themselves. The group called itself “Jane.” Over the years, Jane performed more than 11,000 first and second trimester abortions.

The Working Tapes: Press Agent

From Radio Diaries | Part of the The Working Tapes series | 01:43

Eddie Jaffe was a press agent "legendary for his lost causes, chutzpah and angst," according to his obituary in the New York Times. He represented Broadway and Hollywood stars. In his interview with Terkel, Jaffe looked back on his career and wondered if somehow he had made the wrong choice. This story was produced for the NPR series Working: Then & Now.

Eddie_jaffe_square_small Eddie Jaffe was a press agent "legendary for his lost causes, chutzpah and angst," according to his obituary in the New York Times. He represented Broadway and Hollywood stars. In his interview with Terkel, Jaffe looked back on his career and wondered if somehow he had made the wrong choice. This story was produced for the NPR series Working: Then & Now. 

The Working Tapes: Union Rep

From Radio Diaries | Part of the The Working Tapes series | 04:17

Gary Bryner tells Studs Terkel about being a union member and working in an auto factory for General Motors. Four decades later, he reflects on how factory work and the role of unions have changed. This story was produced for our series The Working Tapes.

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Gary Bryner tells Studs Terkel about being a union member and working in an auto factory for General Motors. Four decades later, he reflects on how factory work and the role of unions have changed.
This interview and others that Terkel recorded for his 1974 book, Working, were boxed away in his house until recently, when Radio Diaries and Project& combed through them and produced a series of audio stories. Thanks to the WFMT Studs Terkel Archive and the Chicago History Museum. More stories from the series are also available on The Radio Diaries Podcast.

The Working Tapes: Phone Operator

From Radio Diaries | Part of the The Working Tapes series | 04:32

Sharon Griggins was 17 years old and working for Illinois Bell as a telephone operator when she was interviewed by Studs Terkel. For a job that required talking to people all day long, Griggins told Terkel that it was a remarkably lonely profession. This is part of the series, The Working Tapes from Radio Diaries and Project&. Radio Diaries dug up Terkel's never-before-broadcast recordings and tracked down surviving interviewees, including Griggins, 45 years later.

Sharon_griggins_square_small Sharon Griggins was 17 years old and working for Illinois Bell as a telephone operator when she was interviewed by Studs Terkel. For a job that required talking to people all day long, Griggins told Terkel that it was a remarkably lonely profession. This is part of the series, The Working Tapes from Radio Diaries and Project&. Radio Diaries dug up Terkel's never-before-broadcast recordings and tracked down surviving interviewees, including Griggins, 45 years later. 

Last Witness: Mission to Hiroshima

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Last Witness series | 04:44

On August 6, 1945 the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, Japan. It was the first time a nuclear weapon had been used in warfare. Russell Gackenbach was a second lieutenant and a navigator on the Necessary Evil. Today, he is the only surviving member of the mission.

Russell_gackenbach_thumnail_small

On August 6, 1945 the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, Japan. It was the first time a nuclear weapon had been used in warfare. There were three strike planes that flew over Hiroshima that day: the Enola Gay which carried the bomb, and two observation planes, the Great Artiste and the Necessary Evil. But most of the 34 crew-members didn’t know that they were carrying the most powerful weapon in the world. Russell Gackenbach was a second lieutenant and a navigator on the Necessary Evil. Today, he is the only surviving member of the mission.

The Working Tapes: Advertising Executive

From Radio Diaries | Part of the The Working Tapes series | 03:19

Studs Terkel interviews a female advertising executive in the 1970's for his book "Working."

Studs1_small Studs Terkel interviews a female advertising executive in the 1970's for his book "Working." Part of the Radio Diaries series The Working Tapes. 

The Working Tapes: Jockey

From Radio Diaries | Part of the The Working Tapes series | 04:10

When he was first interviewed by Studs Terkel in 1971, jockey Eddie Arroyo had been racing for 6 years. He said it was the hardest and most dangerous job he'd ever had. The interview appeared in Terkel's seminal book "Working," but the original recordings have never been heard. Four decades later, Radio Diaries dug up Terkel's interview tapes and tracked down the now-retired jockey Eddie Arroyo.

Eddie_arroyo_square_small

When he was first interviewed by Studs Terkel in 1971, jockey Eddie Arroyo had been racing for 6 years. He said it was the hardest and most dangerous job he'd ever had. The interview appeared in Terkel's seminal book "Working," but the original recording has never been heard. Four decades later, Radio Diaries dug up Terkel's interview tapes and tracked down the now-retired jockey Eddie Arroyo.
This interview and others that Terkel recorded for his 1974 book, Working, were boxed away in his house until recently, when Radio Diaries and Project& combed through them and produced a series of audio stories, Working Then And Now. Thanks to the WFMT Studs Terkel Archive and the Chicago History Museum. More stories from the series are also available on The Radio Diaries Podcast.