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Playlist: Xmas '19

Compiled By: Jeff Reynolds

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White Solstice / Burnt Devil

From Desert Oracle | Part of the Desert Oracle Radio series | 28:00

Well we wound up burning the devil, here in Joshua Tree. It's the kind of winter-holiday fun you can expect up here in the High Desert. And Jason P. Woodbury joins us to investigate a real Low Desert Mystery: Where was "White Christmas" written? There are two answers and they'll both surprise you.

Desert-oracle-radio-prx_small Well we wound up burning the devil, here in Joshua Tree. It's the kind of winter-holiday fun you can expect up here in the High Desert. And Jason P. Woodbury joins us to investigate a real Low Desert Mystery: Where was "White Christmas" written? There are two answers and they'll both surprise you.

Musician's Spotlight -2019 Winter Holiday Special Part One - 732

From John Floridis | Part of the Musician's Spotlight series | 29:04

To wrap up the 2019 broadcast year, a winter holiday special featuring music with themes of Christmas, journeys of darkness into light and songs of snow. All of the music will be by artists who have appeared on Musician’s Spotlight over the last 25 years including Ben Harper, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Bela Fleck and the Flecktones, the Turtle Island String Quartet, Bonnie Raitt, the Indigo Girls, the Cowboy Junkies and Derek Trucks among many others. Part One.

1_small To wrap up the 2019 broadcast year, a winter holiday special featuring music with themes of Christmas, journeys of darkness into light and songs of snow. All of the music will be by artists who have appeared on Musician’s Spotlight over the last 25 years including Ben Harper, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Bela Fleck and the Flecktones, the Turtle Island String Quartet, Bonnie Raitt, the Indigo Girls, the Cowboy Junkies and Derek Trucks among many others. Part One.

The Write Question - Bob Quinn and Liz Carlisle - 374

From KUFM - Montana Public Radio | Part of the The Write Question series | 29:00

Organic farmer, Bob Quinn discusses "Grain by Grain: A Quest to Revive Ancient Wheat, Rural Jobs, and Healthy Food," with his co-author, Liz Carlisle.

Grain-by-grain_book-cover_small

About the Book:

When Bob Quinn was a kid, a stranger at a county fair gave him a few kernels of an unusual grain. Little did he know, that grain would change his life. Years later, after finishing a PhD in plant biochemistry and returning to his family's farm in Montana, Bob started experimenting with organic wheat. In the beginning, his concern wasn't health or the environment; he just wanted to make a decent living and some chance encounters led him to organics.

But as demand for organics grew, so too did Bob's experiments. He discovered that through time-tested practices like cover cropping and crop rotation, he could produce successful yields—without pesticides. Regenerative organic farming allowed him to grow fruits and vegetables in cold, dry Montana, providing a source of local produce to families in his hometown. He even started producing his own renewable energy. And he learned that the grain he first tasted at the fair was actually a type of ancient wheat, one that was proven to lower inflammation rather than worsening it, as modern wheat does.

Ultimately, Bob's forays with organics turned into a multimillion dollar heirloom grain company, Kamut International. In Grain by Grain, Quinn and cowriter Liz Carlisle, author of Lentil Underground, show how his story can become the story of American agriculture. We don't have to accept stagnating rural communities, degraded soil, or poor health. By following Bob's example, we can grow a healthy future, grain by grain.

About the Authors:

Bob Quinn is a leading green businessman, with successful ventures in both organic agriculture and renewable energy.  Raised on a 2,400 acre wheat and cattle ranch in Montana, Quinn earned a Ph.D. in plant biochemistry at UC Davis before coming home to farm in 1978. In 1986, he planted his first organic crop, and by 1989, he had converted his entire farm. He served on the first National Organic Standards Board, which spurred the creation of the USDA's National Organic Program, and has been recognized with the Montana Organic Association Lifetime of Service Award, The Organic Trade Association Organic Leadership Award, and Rodale Institute's Organic Pioneer Award. As an entrepreneur, Quinn has founded five significant enterprises: a regional mill for organic and heritage grains, an organic snack company, a business that sells culinary oil and recycles it as biofuel, Montana's first wind farm, and Kamut International. Kamut, the ancient grain Quinn revived from a pint jar of seed found in a neighbor's basement, is now grown on 100,000 acres of certified organic cropland and manufactured into over 3500 products worldwide. In addition, Bob remains active in research, and has co-authored pioneering studies on the nutritional benefits of ancient grain.

 

Liz Carlisle is a Lecturer in the School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University, where she teaches courses on food and agriculture, sustainability transition, and environmental communication. She holds a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley and a B.A. from Harvard University, and she formerly served as Legislative Correspondent for Agriculture and Natural Resources in the Office of U.S. Senator Jon Tester. Recognized for her academic writing with the Elsevier Atlas Award, which honors research with social impact, Liz has also published numerous pieces for general audience readers, in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Business Insider, and Stanford Social Innovation Review. A former country singer who once opened shows for Travis Tritt, LeAnn Rimes, and Sugarland, Carlisle brings a populist flair to the 40+ talks she gives each year. Her first book, Lentil Underground, (2015) won the Montana Book Award and the Green Prize for Sustainable Literature.

Kevin Walker on our Grand Food Bargain

From Alex Wise | Part of the Sea Change Radio series | 29:00

You’re walking the aisles of your local grocery store, picking out fresh ingredients for dinner — you get to the counter, pay for it, bag it, and you’re off. Pretty simple, right? Well, that little mindless exchange was the product of thousands of years of human development. There was a time, not that long ago, when acquiring what you needed to survive entailed far more individual effort. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Kevin Walker about his new book, The Grand Food Bargain, to learn about the ups and downs of all this food abundance. We take a look back at how we got here, some of the unforeseen outcomes from this grand bargain, and what we ought to do moving forward. You may just take a step back in wonder the next time you go to the store for a loaf of bread, a container of milk, and a stick of butter.

Kevinwalker_small You’re walking the aisles of your local grocery store, picking out fresh ingredients for dinner — you get to the counter, pay for it, bag it, and you’re off. Pretty simple, right? Well, that little mindless exchange was the product of thousands of years of human development. There was a time, not that long ago, when acquiring what you needed to survive entailed far more individual effort. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Kevin Walker about his new book, The Grand Food Bargain, to learn about the ups and downs of all this food abundance. We take a look back at how we got here, some of the unforeseen outcomes from this grand bargain, and what we ought to do moving forward. You may just take a step back in wonder the next time you go to the store for a loaf of bread, a container of milk, and a stick of butter.

Spectrum 12/17/2019

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Spectrum: World of Science & Technology ~ from DW series | 30:00

This week on the show: Don't open until Christmas -
Want to give the perfect gift, but also receive it? There's some surprisingly rich science on the subject that'll save you money and guilt. Also why we end up despising certain Christmas songs, and the future of shopping.

Sp1_small This week on the show: Don't open until Christmas - Want to give the perfect gift, but also receive it? There's some surprisingly rich science on the subject that'll save you money and guilt. Also why we end up despising certain Christmas songs, and the future of shopping.

Christmas Stories Part 2 A Christmas Carol on Wheels

From Charles McGuigan | Part of the A Grain of Sand series | 27:05

A hundred years before Frank Kapra ever dreamed up a wonderful life, Charles Dickens had already penned the seminal Christmas classic. For the past five years three actors and a handful of puppets have performed A Christmas Carol in under twenty minutes.

Mark_lerman_actor_producer_small A hundred years before Frank Kapra ever dreamed up a wonderful life, Charles Dickens had already penned the seminal Christmas classic. For the past five years three actors and a handful of puppets have performed A Christmas Carol in under twenty minutes.

All In Time

From Sarah Boothroyd | 25:01

Guided by science and science fiction, All In Time traverses the timeless mystery of time itself.

All_in_time_-_credit_paulo_martel_small NOTE: you can listen to the stereo .wav version of this piece at: http://sarahboothroyd.com/artwork/2053112_ALL_IN_TIME.html

 

The clock ticks; the moon waxes; the autumn leaves turn crimson. Time is as ubiquitous as it is elusive. Guided by science and science fiction, All In Time traverses the timeless mystery of time itself.

This 25-minute work won the 2011 Luc Ferrari International Broadcast Arts Competition, won a 2011 Gold World Medal for Best Sound at the New York Festivals Radio Programming Awards, and was shortlisted for the 2011 Phonurgia Nova Prize.

All In Time was commissioned by La Muse En Circuit in Paris (Centre National de Création Musicale), with the support of Radio Suisse Romande, Deutschlandradio Kultur, RTBF Musiq 3, Groupe de Recherches Musicales, and Radio-France.

In 2011 All In Time was broadcast on Radio Suisse Romande in Switzerland; on Deutschlandradio Kultur in Germany; on Swedish Radio Channel 2; on TIK ArtRadio Days in Slovakia; on The Radius (New York), WKXR (New York), WMUA (Massachusetts), KUT (Texas), and KFAI (Minnesota) in the U.S.A.; and on over 40 radio stations around the world, thanks to the Radiophonic Creation Day Festival and the Future Places Festival.

This independent production was also published on two CDs – Deep Wireless VIII and Concours d'art radiophonique Luc Ferrari: Composer Le Réel – and was featured in several online publications; including Transom.org, Public Radio Remix Blog, Third Coast International Audio Festival, Syntone, InStereoPress, Girrlsound, and Infinity's Kitchen.

In 2011, All In Time was also presented in spatialized, octophonic format at the Archipel Contemporary Music Festival in Switzerland; at Festival Extension XI and the Prix Phonurgia Nova Concert in France; at Netaudio London in the U.K.; at the Ohrenhoch Sound Art Gallery in Germany; at the Deep Wireless Festival (Toronto) and Canadian Electroacoustic Community Anniversary Concert (Vancouver) in Canada; and at the PNEM Festival in The Netherlands.

Written, recorded, edited and mixed by Sarah Boothroyd, special thanks are extended to physics maven Peter Watson; to antique clock collector Georges Royer; to Travis Morgan and Dokashiteru for providing Creative Commons samples; and to Himan and Melina Brown for permitting the use of CBS Radio Mystery Theatre clips.



To read more about this production please visit
http://transom.org/?p=16802,
http://thirdcoastfestival.org/library/1009-all-in-time?closed=true, and
http://publicradioremix.org/2011/09/pressing-play-may-stop-time

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