%s1 / %s2

Playlist: Back to School

Compiled By: Philosophy Talk

 Credit:
No text

The Value of a College Education

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:59

Are college graduates happier, or better prepared for life?

Value-of-college_small

With 43.3 million Americans burdened with a total of $1.3 trillion in student loan debt, high school students thinking about attending college are faced with a daunting decision. Should they risk joining the ranks of the indebted in order to get a college degree? The answer depends on the value of a college education. Are college graduates happier, or better prepared for life? Is it the government’s job to ensure that investing in college is worth it for students? Should public colleges be free? Or would that decrease their value? And would studying philosophy increase or decrease the value of a college education? John and Ken get collegial with former Stanford president John Hennessy, in a program recorded live at De Anza High School in Richmond, California.

Education and the Culture Wars

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:58

How should we reconcile conflicts between the state’s responsibility to properly educate minors and the parents’ rights to influence their children's values and ideals?

9780226012766_small

In contemporary democracies, the state is responsible  for providing children with an education. But parents surely have both the right and responsibility for instilling appropriate morals and values in their children. How should we reconcile conflicts between the state’s responsibility to properly educate minors and the parents’ rights to influence their children's values and ideals? Should the government’s approach to education in areas such as history and science always trump that of the child’s most direct guardians? Or should parents hold some veto power when it comes to education about evolution, sex, and other issues that bear on religious and personal values? John and Ken do their homework with Stanford political scientist Rob Reich, co-editor of Education, Justice, and Democracy.

Deconstructing the College Admissions Rat Race

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:58

What values are implicit in the American college admissions process?

41ynrjcfj_l

America's elite colleges and universities spend millions of dollars to generate thousands of applicants, the vast majority of whom they reject.  High school students – and their parents – work hard to gain entry to such institutions, and can be devastated by the rejection. Is there a purpose to this rat race?  John and Ken offer admission to Mitchell Stevens from Stanford's School of Education, author of Creating A Class: College Admissions and the Education of Elites, for a program recorded with an audience of high school students in Palo Alto, California.

The Idea of the University

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:59

Is a university a research institute with students, or and educational institution with research around the edges – or something in between?

Gates-of-harvard-yard-book-signing-03_small

To whom does the university answer – the trustees?  The administration?  The faculty?  The students?  Or something more abstract, like knowledge and wisdom?  John and Ken examine the very idea of a university with Stanford Provost John Etchemendy.

2019-08-25 Freedom of Speech on Campus

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:58

Do all views have a place on university campuses, or are there some views that should never be given a platform?

71-ydppctrl_small In the last few years, conservatives and liberals alike have accused activists on college campuses of silencing contrary opinions. Many have argued—quite vociferously—that activists’ unwillingness to hear from people with opposing opinions endangers freedom of speech in higher education. But is there really an Orwellian threat to free speech on college campuses? Are activists’ demands for respect actually quashing freedom of thought? And when does one person’s freedom of speech impinge on another’s? John and Ken share a safe space with Greg Lukianoff, co-author of The Coddling of the American Mind.