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Playlist: AARP Radio's Portfolio

Prime Time Radio Host, Mike Cuthbert Credit:
Prime Time Radio Host, Mike Cuthbert

Prime Time Radio host Mike Cuthbert is a skilled interviewer and acute listener whose thorough preparation surprises and delights his guests. A native of Wisconsin, Mike holds a master's degree in music and education. He led the development of WGMS in Washington, DC into one of the nation's leading classical music radio stations. Mike has hosted talk radio shows on top-rated WRKO in Boston, WCKY in Cincinnati, where he was designated "Best Talk Show Host," and public radio's WAMU in Washington, where he was recognized with a number of broadcasting awards. Married with five grown children and two grandchildren, Mike also co-hosts a radio program on books and is working on a number of fiction writing projects.
Prime Time Radio is a one-hour weekly interview program that focuses on the wide-ranging interests and concerns of Americans 40 and older. The program is heard on radio stations across the country as well as right here on AARP's web site.

During each program, Mike converses intelligently, provocatively, and easily with newsmakers like Hillary Rodham Clinton, cultural icons like actor Alan Alda, and voices from the past like Studs Terkel, drawing out their personalities and weaving their insights and expertise into stimulating discussions. Prime Time Radio also brings in top authorities on science, health, and medicine, and leading voices on the social issues and concerns we share as we navigate all stages of aging. Hide full description

Prime Time Radio host Mike Cuthbert is a skilled interviewer and acute listener whose thorough preparation surprises and delights his guests. A native of Wisconsin, Mike holds a master's degree in music and education. He led the development of WGMS in Washington, DC into one of the nation's leading classical music radio stations. Mike has hosted talk radio shows on top-rated WRKO in Boston, WCKY in Cincinnati, where he was designated "Best Talk Show Host," and public radio's WAMU in Washington, where he was recognized with a number of broadcasting awards. Married with five grown children and two grandchildren, Mike also co-hosts a radio program on books and is working on a number of... Show full description

Featured

Team of Rivals

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:57

Ever since the election -- or even further back, when Barack Obama chose former rival Joe Biden as his running mate -- the blogosphere and the punditocracy have been comparing the president-elect to another senator from Illinois...Abraham Lincoln.

Playing
Team of Rivals
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AARP Radio

Mike_ptr_thumb_small That talk reached fever pitch this week, with word that Mr. Obama may offer the job of Secretary of State to his main primary opponent, Hillary Clinton, or perhaps another rival turned supporter, Governor Bill Richardson.

From the Washington Post to Jon Stewart's The Daily Show, comparisons to Abraham Lincoln's "Team of Rivals" as described by historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, continue to flood the airwaves and the nation's newspapers. ( a search on Google News for "team rivals obama lincoln" brings up 1,550 hits).

Mike Cuthbert talked with Goodwin about her book when it first came out in 2005. Use our audio player at left to listen to excerpts from their conversation, or listen to the whole program, with the player below.

Goodwin talks about how she came upon the idea to write a book on Lincoln with this focus (Beginnings). She describes his first pick, of William H. Seward to be his Secretary of State (The Cabinet). And she goes into some detail about how he balanced the cabinet with friends and foes, always striving to pick the best man for the job (Balancing).

Even his Supreme Court pick of Salmon P. Chase was a bold move involving a former rival.

Listen also to Goodwin on Lincoln's Jokes, his gratitude and pride at winning the Soldiers' Vote, his political considerations about the timing of Emancipation, his deep respect for abolitionist Frederick Douglass, and her view of the personality that allowed him to accomplish the great things he did (Lincoln's Genius).

Finally, hear the tribute paid by his former enemy Seward upon learning of Lincoln's death.

Roger and Elizabeth Wilkins: Father and Daughter on Obama Inauguration

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Special hour on Obama's Inauguration

Wilkinsanddaughter_small One of the most compelling story lines growing out of the historic election of Barack Obama as President has been the reactions of Americans who truly never thought an African American would win the Presidency in their lifetime. A fascinating example of the range and depth of these reactions comes from Roger Wilkins, a veteran of the Civil Rights movement whose long experience made him initially skeptical of the Obama candidacy, and his daughter Elizabeth, an early Obama supporter and tireless campaign worker.  The election brought them together and so did we - in our studio for a remarkable and delightful conversation between generations about a shared historic event. 

Caregiving in the New Millennium

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:00:27

Caregiving and Final Days …this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Gail Sheehy has been described as “America’s most therapeutic journalist." Her ability to help boomers navigate their way through the emotional and practical components of aging has led to her current position as AARP’s Caregiving Ambassador. Before losing her husband to cancer, Gail joined an army of 44.5 million unpaid Americans assuming the roll of caregiver.

 

Then… “To live is to love, and without love there can be no life.” Minister Forrest Church often shares those words with his congregants after they've lost a loved one. Today, the 60-year-old son of the late senator Frank Church is reflecting upon those same words as he examines his own life, now that he's been diagnosed with terminal cancer. He joins us to share his struggles and comforts in knowing his time is almost up.

Caregiving in the New Millennium

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:00:27

Caregiving and Final Days …this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Gail Sheehy has been described as “America’s most therapeutic journalist." Her ability to help boomers navigate their way through the emotional and practical components of aging has led to her current position as AARP’s Caregiving Ambassador. Before losing her husband to cancer, Gail joined an army of 44.5 million unpaid Americans assuming the roll of caregiver.

 

Then… “To live is to love, and without love there can be no life.” Minister Forrest Church often shares those words with his congregants after they've lost a loved one. Today, the 60-year-old son of the late senator Frank Church is reflecting upon those same words as he examines his own life, now that he's been diagnosed with terminal cancer. He joins us to share his struggles and comforts in knowing his time is almost up.

Laid Off

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Why Millions of American's are being laid off and how it's impacting those 50+.

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Laid Off
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AARP Radio

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From furloughs to lay offs…the current state of the economy has forced companies (large and small) to slash their budgets. Instead of annual raises, millions of American’s have been left unemployed and fighting to survive. In this special hour, a panel of experts: Bob Baugh, Exec. Dir. AFL-CIO Industrial Union Council; Lynn Minnick, Workforce Development Specialist, National Employment Law Project; Robert Trumble, Prof. Management and Dir. Virginia Labor Studies Center joins host, Mike Cuthbert to discuss America’s economic crisis and why it’s leaving millions of American’s laid off.

Yusuf

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:56

New music by Yusuf and the Third Chapter...this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Yusuf
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AARP Radio

Ptr-catstevens-1_small British singer-songwriter, Cat Stevens once topped the billboard charts globally, selling more than 60 million albums. At the peak of his career, in 1977, he converted to Islam and devoted his life to promoting peace in the world. Today, he comes to us as “Yusuf,” his Islamic name, and shares the many trials and tribulations he’s endured throughout his career and the impact his decision to convert to Islam has had on his career and life.

Then, For most people, the first half of their life is spent trying to please others… families, friends, employers, etc.
So, when is it your turn to live life on your terms? According to Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, Professor of Education at Harvard, the 25 years after 50 is when most people start living. She refers to this time of your life as the Third Chapter, which is also the title of her book. importantly…fulfill your passions.”

American Thighs

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:53

American Thighs and Snark...this week on Prime Time Radio.

Ptr-jillconner_small The reigning monarch of the Sweet Potato Queens: Jill Conner Browne, uses humor to tackle the many mundane topics on every aging boomer’s mind (and body!). In her new book: American Thighs: The Sweet Potato Queens’ Guide to Preserving Your Assets - Browne shares her hilarious thoughts… and lack there of - about everything from forgetfulness to “granny panties.”

Then, We’ve all heard clever puts down and witty cheap shots – but David Denby, film critic for The New Yorker magazine, says it’s getting out of hand.  He’s named these obnoxious snide comments as snarks and says that “snarkers are weakening intellectual engagement and it’s spreading like pink-eye through both mainstream media and the Internet.” Today, he shares his research and declaration for ending the invariable hateful talk in his essay: Snark.

American Thighs

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:53

American Thighs and Snark...this week on Prime Time Radio.

Ptr-jillconner_small The reigning monarch of the Sweet Potato Queens: Jill Conner Browne, uses humor to tackle the many mundane topics on every aging boomer’s mind (and body!). In her new book: American Thighs: The Sweet Potato Queens’ Guide to Preserving Your Assets - Browne shares her hilarious thoughts… and lack there of - about everything from forgetfulness to “granny panties.”

Then, We’ve all heard clever puts down and witty cheap shots – but David Denby, film critic for The New Yorker magazine, says it’s getting out of hand.  He’s named these obnoxious snide comments as snarks and says that “snarkers are weakening intellectual engagement and it’s spreading like pink-eye through both mainstream media and the Internet.” Today, he shares his research and declaration for ending the invariable hateful talk in his essay: Snark.

Vermeer's Family Secrets

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Vermeer's Family Secrets and a course in happiness...this week on Prime Time Radio.

Ptr-mardi_horowitz_-_c_sara_schelling2_small At the time of his death, Johannes Vermeer’s family was left bereft and in debt.  It was only much later that the 17th century artist came to be considered one of the greatest painters of all time, and his works were recognized as the crowning achievement of the Dutch Golden Age.

Benjamin Binstock, specialist in Northern Renaissance and Baroque Art, offers a daring new account of Vermeer’s art and life in his latest book: “Vermeer's Family Secrets: Genius, Discovery, and the Unknown Apprentice.”

Then...Psychiatrist Mardi Horowitz believes that professional insight into achieving happiness is possible for anyone. So, he’s created a road map to teach individuals how to master what he calls “three levels of self-understanding,” which can lead to true and lasting contentment.

Special Hour on Gay Rights

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

The GLBT civil rights movement…this week on Prime Time Radio.

222px_channelpage Frank Kameny was a key player in the birth of the gay rights movement, especially the Washington, D.C. branch of it. He's 84 years old, and starting in the late 1950s, he put his job and his life on the line for a cause he believed in. Now, he's an honored elder, and much of what he fought for has come to pass.

In this conversation with host Mike Cuthbert, he describes the Stonewall riots–the incident that ignited a movement–and tells his own story of being fired and shunned in Washington, D.C. years before he was embraced and honored there.

A Son of the Game

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:00:12

A Son of the Game and Frankly, My Dear…this week on Prime Time Radio.

Dodson_jim_small For author Jim Dodson, the game of golf is more than drives and chip shots. He tells Prime Time Radio host Mike Cuthbert that golf provided the backdrop for many of the most important moments in his life. In his New York Times bestseller "Final Rounds," Dodson describes how golf affected his relationship with his ailing father; in his new book, "A Son of the Game," he recounts his efforts to impart some of the sport's mystique to his own son. 

Then… Clark Gable's exit line: “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn,” ranks among the most unforgettable movie quotes of all time. Yet, it's just one of the legendary moments in the epic movie classic "Gone with the Wind," which this year marks its 70th anniversary.
Writer and critic Molly Haskell has explored the movie, the book on which it was based, and the many characters real and fictional that combined to make it the cultural phenomenon that it is in a new book titled "Frankly, My Dear."

Mentoring USA

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:56

Mentoring USA and Summer World…this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Mentoring USA
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AARP Radio

Summerworld_small "Change a life. Become a mentor." That's the challenge put forward by Mentoring USA, a non-profit that matches successful and caring grownups with youngsters in need of direction and support. Prime Time Radio host Mike Cuthbert talks with founder Matilda Raffa Cuomo and actor and author Charles Grodin, who is active with the group.

Then… The snow has melted and the April showers have awakened your perennials. Birds are chirping, woodpeckers are pecking and caterpillars are cocooning. But, what’s life really like in the animal kingdom?

Award-winning nature writer Bernd Heinrich shares rich illustrations in "Summer World: A Season of Bounty," and takes us on an up close and personal journey through animal survival in the summer.

Remembering Dr. Dorothy Height

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:00:01

Prime Time Radio re-broadcasts an hour-long special with Civil Rights pioneer Dr. Dorothy Height.

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Dr. Dorothy Height was a woman of graceful determination. An iconic figure in the advancement of racial justice and gender equality, Dr. Height was often and fondly referred to as the "Queen Mother" of the civil rights movement.

In 2003, Dr. Height discussed her life with Prime Time Radio host Mike Cuthbert.

Dr. Height died on April 20, 2010 at the age of 98.

This conversation originally aired August 26, 2003.

Laura Hillenbrand: Unbroken

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:53

Laura Hillenbrand on Unbroken and Joyce Carol Oats memoir: A Widow's Story...this week on Prime Time Radio.

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This week, we begin with an astounding tale of athletic success and courage, all from the same man. His name is Louis Zamperini and he was, at one time, the best high school age runner in the US, if not the world. His dreams of an Olympic medal were shattered by WWII and he became a bombardier. The story of his survival in Japanese POW camps is astounding and is told expertly by Laura Hillenbrand, author of “Seabiscuit.

Then, we talk with Joyce Carol Oates. The award-winning author and novelist writes of her adjustment to the death of her husband of many years and why she came to hate the mailman who delivered plastic-wrapped chocolates. “A Widow’s Story” is particularly interesting because of Oates’ two personae: wife and member of her community and “Joyce Carol Oates”—literary figure and teacher.

Courage and sorrow this week on Prime Time Radio.

Laura Hillenbrand: Unbroken

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:53

Laura Hillenbrand on Unbroken and Joyce Carol Oats memoir: A Widow's Story...this week on Prime Time Radio.

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This week, we begin with an astounding tale of athletic success and courage, all from the same man. His name is Louis Zamperini and he was, at one time, the best high school age runner in the US, if not the world. His dreams of an Olympic medal were shattered by WWII and he became a bombardier. The story of his survival in Japanese POW camps is astounding and is told expertly by Laura Hillenbrand, author of “Seabiscuit.

Then, we talk with Joyce Carol Oates. The award-winning author and novelist writes of her adjustment to the death of her husband of many years and why she came to hate the mailman who delivered plastic-wrapped chocolates. “A Widow’s Story” is particularly interesting because of Oates’ two personae: wife and member of her community and “Joyce Carol Oates”—literary figure and teacher.

Courage and sorrow this week on Prime Time Radio.

Black History Month "Prime Time" exclusive hour with Russell Simmons and Dr. Rubin "Hurricane" Carter

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:56

Russell Simmons: Super Rich and Dr. Rubin "Hurricane" Carter: Eye of the Hurricane this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small This week, Prime Time Radio airs an exclusive Black History Month special featuring an interview with hip- hop mogul and philanthropist, Russell Simmons and former middle-weight boxer Dr. Rubin “Hurricane” Carter. Both had risky starts, Simmons with drugs and drug-selling and Carter with thuggery and jail sentences. From there on, their lives went in opposite directions. Simmons passion for hip- hop led him to co-founding Def Jam Records which, eventually branched out into other businesses as diverse as financial services and clothing design. Carter, on the other hand, let his innate violence carry him almost to the middleweight boxing championship of the world. His career was crushingly halted by a false conviction for murder and he spent twenty years in prison, trying to learn all he could in order to get out. After he did, he became an advocate for wrongly convicted persons and continues his work today. Two divergent stories, both with reasonably happy endings, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Birds in full song, and Holocaust liberators’ stories

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Les Beletsky - The Bird Bible and Leila Levinson - Gated Grief this week on Prime Time Radio.

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This week, a discussion of and a concert by birds. A new songbird book is out with recordings of over 700 North American birds, accompanied by full descriptions, pictures and habitats. We’ll learn why it’s the males that sing the loudest and longest, the difference between a song and a call and how birds signal not only their species but even their geographical location to other birds.

Then…we talk with the daughter of a Holocaust liberator as she delves into the mental and physical damage done to those who found the camps and what lay within them. Talking with liberators and their families, she discovers the depth of the horror they experienced and why many of them have not until recently even mentioned it.

Birds in full song, and Holocaust liberators’ stories, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Trucking My Blues Away

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:01:57

Truckin’ My Blues Away - Part One and Truckin’ My Blues Away - Part Two this week on Prime Time Radio.

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This music-rich special introduces listeners to the stories and sounds of four older Southern bluesmen—and to the efforts of Tim Duffy, founder of the Music Maker Relief Foundation, to help lift these musicians from poverty and obscurity.

The musicians cover a wide swath of the South: Boo Hanks from Virgilina, Va.; Captain Luke from Winston-Salem, N.C.; Eddie Tigner from Atlanta; and Little Freddie King from New Orleans. In their own words and performances, these men bring us the story of a music, an era and a culture that are uniquely American.

The program is co-produced and co-written by Richard Ziglar and Barry Yeoman, who traveled around the South collecting interviews and field recordings of the musicians. Yeoman, who co-produced our Gracie Award-winning program "Picking Up the Pieces," narrates.

Prime Time Radio presents "Truckin' My Blues Away," a music-rich documentary that profiles four Southern bluesmen and the folklorist who is working to preserve their music and showcase it on the world stage.

The Ultimate Cheapskate

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

The ultimate cheapskate and the next hundred million, this week on Prime Time Radio

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If the thought of purchasing boxed wine makes you cringe, you’d be surprised to know that the taste won’t…if money is a factor. Jeff Yeager, author of a series of “Ultimate Cheapskate” books, to help individuals live better lives by spending and consuming less, says that boxed wine may seem cheap, but cheap is the new cool.


In his latest book, “The Cheapskate Next Door,” Yeager outlines how to live happily below your means, while also encompassing stories from other fellow cheapskates.

Then … Throughout history, race has been an important factor in determining economic status. Today, however, the importance of race as an economic predictor is waning, and, according to Joel Kotkin, will soon give way to CLASS.

In his new book: The Next Hundred Million: America in 2050," Kotkin predicts believes class will be the key factor affecting economic status for the next forty-years.

An internationally recognized authority on global, economic, political and social trends, he shares this and other fascinating predictions of life on Earth in 2050, when there will be an additional100 million people.

Ultimate Cheapskate and the next hundred million… this week on Prime Time Radio.


 

Practical Wisdom

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Practical wisdom and John Kralik's 365 Thank Yous, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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The concept seems simple...do the right thing because it's the right thing to do; but somehow, this moral wisdom (which is as old as Aristotle) has begun to slip away from our society.

Authors, Barry Schwartz and Kenneth Sharpe offer insightful suggestions to help us get back to our "Practical Wisdom".

Then… Your honorable, John Kralik thought his life was slowly unraveling before his eyes just a few short years ago. But then, he heard a saying in his head, which led to his decision to send out “365 Thank Yous” for an entire year.   The unanticipated results of his personal campaign changed his life and many of his friends and colleagues as well.

 

Practical wisdom and 365 Thank yous… this week on Prime Time Radio.

Breast Care

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Dr. Susan Love and Suzanne Berne, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Breast Care
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AARP Radio

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Dr. Susan Love's Breast Book has been considered the bible of breast-care books since it appeared in 1990. Now, in its fifth edition, Dr. Susan Love, co-founder of the National Breast Cancer Coalition and renowned breast cancer and women’s health expert dives into the every day (and not so everyday) questions women may have about one of their most intricate assets: breast.

Then… They say money can't buy you happiness and Lucile Kroger-Berne, grandmother of author Suzanne Berne might have agreed! In 1932, Lucile, the daughter of Bernard Kroger (whose enterprise is worth $76 billion today) died, leaving her six-year-old son motherless and extremely melancholy.

Nearly 80-years later author Suzanne Berne went on a quest to understand the life of her deceased grandmother in an effort to heal the pain of her ailing father. The result brought her new book: Missing Lucile: Memories of a grandmother I never knew.

Breast care and missing Lucile … this week on Prime Time Radio.

Ronald Reagan @ 100

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Reagan and Paris, this week on Prime Time Radio

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This week a controversial memoir by the youngest son of Ronald Reagan. It’s controversial, yet interesting, because it has drawn fire from the oldest son of Reagan and presents a balanced view of a complex man whom many like to portray simply. Ron Reagan admits that he and his father crossed swords on ideological issues many times, but what emerges is the story of a man whose ideology was part of a self-scripted life that had many parts.

Then, we revel in the experiences of 32 writers who at one time, or still, live in Paris. The City of Light turns out to be the perfect place for depression and melancholy according to several of the writers and we learn perhaps more than we want to know about French women, their relationship with fashion and food and with men.

That’s Pres. Reagan and Paris, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Going Home To Glory: A Memoir

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

David and Julie Eisenhower: Dwight Eisenhower, Going Home to Glory and Dr. Dorree Lynn: Adults/Seniors and STD's, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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In this fascinating conversation David and his wife Julie Nixon-Eisenhower, daughter of President Richard Nixon, discuss the complexities of the man they knew as granddad and the “General” they watched on television.

Then… Sex for grownups doesn’t die once you hit a certain age, but neither does the need to practice safe sex. According to a University of Indiana study, only one in five men and one in four women over 50 use condoms. Psychologist, Dr. Dorree Lynn is the author of Sex For Grownups: The Truths, Lies, and Must-Tries For Great Sex After 50 and she shares tips for maintaining a healthy, fun and safe sex life.

Going home to glory: A Memoir and Safe Sex For Grownups … this week on Prime Time Radio.

Prime Time Radio Christmas Special: The Bells of the National Cathedral

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:02:03

Prime Time Radio's National Cathedral's Carillon Christmas Special, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Join us for a rebroadcast of Prime Time Radio's popular holiday program – an hour-long special featuring the bells of Washington National Cathedral’s carillon. 

Host Mike Cuthbert ascended the bell tower and sat in the “wheelhouse” with distinguished carillonneur Edward Nassor who played the beautiful bells expressly for Prime Time Radio.  He and Mike also had a fascinating conversation about the history and workings of the bells.

Christmas Special: The Bells of the National Catheral … this week on Prime Time Radio.

Frida Kahlo: Face-to-Face

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:00:00

Judy Chicago speaks about Frida Kahlo and entrepreneur Chris Rabb, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small Surrealist artist, Frida Kahlo never shied away from revealing her deepest and most passionate emotions. Her self-portraits rendered her bold unibrow and faint mustache while also depicting her rollercoaster fight with pain and health issues. Artist, Judy Chicago and  art historian Frances Borzello contextualized Kahlo’s artistic achievements in their work: Frida Kahlo: Face to Face.
 
Then… There’s about a one in 1,000 chance that a small business will survive five years according to financial consultant Chris Rabb. In his book: Invisible Capital: How Unforeseen Forces Shape Entrepreneurial Opportunity, Rabb examines the dramatic impact of entrepreneurial viability.


Pension Rights

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Karen Friedman and Val Walker, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Mike_ptr_thumb_small There’s a $6.6 trillion dollar deficit in Americans’ retirement incomes.  That figure – worth repeating – 6-point-6 TRILLION DOLLARS - represents the gap between what American households actually have in pensions and retirement savings   and what they should have to be able to retire comfortably.  The astounding come from a recent survey prepared for Retirement USA – an initiative of the Pension Rights Center, whose Policy Director, Karen Friedman, sat down with Mike Cuthbert to discuss the great American Retirement Deficit.


Then… What do you say to someone who’s suffering?  How do you connect with another human being in need in a meaningful way?  Most of us struggle to come up with the right words, or do the right thing to help someone who needs help.  Val Walker is an expert in the unique art of providing comfort – having worked with disabled vets and bereavement support groups for many years.  She provides incredible valuable advice in her new book:  “The Art of Comforting: What to Say and Do for People in Distress”. Still the smartest talker and She was one of us…this week on Prime Time Radio.

Pension rights and the art of comforting…this week on Prime Time Radio.

Boosting Credit, Reducing Debt

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Lynnette Khalfani-Cox and Charles Seife, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Negative marks on your credit history can be a nightmare—sky-high interest rates, getting turned down for loans or the embarrassment of asking family members or friends to co-sign for you.

In today's tight economy even folks with "good" credit histories are having a hard time. The Money Coach Lynnette Khalfani-Cox has seven steps to getting a good credit rating. Khalfani-Cox is a former Wall Street reporter for CNBC and the author of Perfect Credit. Listen as she tells Prime Time Radio host Mike Cuthbert how she freed herself from $100,000 in debt.

 

Then, "Proofiness", says mathematician-turned-journalist, Charles Seife is the growing practice of using fake numbers to prove a lie. And it's being employed increasingly to mislead all of us - to convince us that what is, in fact isn't, by using math to make us believe untruths.  It's a thought-provoking concept, explained in this conversation with Mike Cuthbert.

Perfect Credit and proofiness…this week on Prime Time Radio.

Shock of Gray

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:57

Ted Fishman discusses aging and Sissela Bok explores happiness, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Shock of Gray
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AARP Radio

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The world’s population is rapidly aging. By the year 2030, one billion
people will be sixty-five or older and according to veteran journalist and
best-selling author, Ted Fishman, life as we know it will alter in ways no
one ever expected.

In his book, Shock of Gray he discusses the effects
of global aging - both the predictable and the unexpected, the changes it
will bring to nations, cultures and human relationships.

Then, What does it take to be happy? The search for an answer to that question has
filled libraries and airwaves and conversations since the beginning of human
thought.  The distinguished philosopher Sissela Bok has focused her
considerable talents on exploring the huge reservoir of thinking on the
nature of happiness from psychologists and neuroscientists to economists and
philosophers. Her insight, conclusions and original thinking are spelled out
in her book: Exploring Happiness: From Aristotle to Brain Science.

Shock of Gray and Exploring Happiness…this week on Prime Time Radio.

A Conversation with Dr. Donald Berwick from CMS

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:50

Dr. Donald Berwick and Peter Guber this week on Prime Time Radio.

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In a conversation with Dr. Donald Berwick, Administrator of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services we find out what is already happening as a result of the Affordable Care Act and what is being planned for the future. We spend considerable time discussing electronic medical records and how they are modernizing all of medicine. We also investigate the progress being made in evaluating quality of care and how that will work in the future.

Then Peter Guber, former Hollywood studio head and currently head of the Mandalay Entertainment Group, discusses telling stories to get the job done. He discusses specific storytelling principles that make for more effective presentations of yourself as any product you may be selling and uses Hollywood stories as examples.

The real story of aging and real stories that work this week on Prime Time Radio.

Never Say Die

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:50

Susan Jacoby and Dr. Martin Agronin this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Susan Jacoby takes a hard look at the dying business: not funerals but the money, time and energy spent denying that death happens. From the nonsense of “65 is the new 40” to anti-aging marketing to plastic surgery, she looks at ways we avoid the fact that death will come to us all eventually and there are rational and humane ways to prepare ourselves for it as well as those we love.

Then, we look at aging another way with Dr. Martin Agronin, a gerontologist who loves his work. Dr. Agronin and Susan Jacoby both probe the concept of “wisdom with age” with varying views of the subject and Agronin discusses dementia and how to fight both the fear and the odds. He also discusses how successful aging contains a “sustained capacity for joy” and how that can be a felt part of every life.

Aging and death the discussion points this week on Prime Time Radio.

An Improvised Life

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Alan Arkin and Chris Gardner this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Oscar nominated actor, Alan Arkin tells of his life-long love for acting which has led him to a unique career in both theater and film in his memoir, “An Improvised Life”.  Although he touchingly writes of his family in the book, he speaks not so much about his personal life, nor does he spend much time on his movies.  However, he portrays a genuine passion for the art of improvisation through his tales of acting workshops, work philosophies and explains why he’s been obsessed with acting since he was a child.

Then, when is the right time to start making changes in your life for the better? According to AARP spokesperson and motivational speaker Chris Gardner it’s always now.   

“Start Were You Are”, Chris Gardner’s second inspirational book is a life changing guide to getting through life’s toughest situations with dignity and transforming your life from what it is to what you dream it to be.  He shares many hard learned life lessons and gives insight to the attitudes and decisions that brought him success.

Alan Arkin and Chris Gardner are this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Money Class

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:50

Suze Orman and Jeff Greenfield this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Suze Orman talks about the American Dream and why it’s now dead. She also explains how to create a more realistic, honest American Dream. Living within your means and how to get out of debt are also big topics in her new book, “The Money Class”.

Then, chief news correspondent for CBS and former presidential speechwriter, Jeff Greenfield discusses alternate American histories in our recent past in, “Then Everything Changed”.  What if John F Kennedy had been assassinated before he was elected and took office? What if Robert Kennedy had not been assassinated and beats out Nixon to see us through the end of the Vietnam War?  These are just two of the scenarios covered in the novel “Then Everything Changed”.

Suze Orman’s Money Class and “Then Everything Changed”, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Moral Underground

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Lisa Dodson and Pamela Madsen this week on Prime Time Radio.

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How does a mother have time to pick up her kids from school when she needs to work double shifts? What does a father do when he makes less money than he needs to live feed his family? “The Moral Underground” is a very serious set of essays and interviews about the ethical implications of ordinary Americans who bend the rules of their jobs or laws to help those who are less fortunate or have no place to turn for help.  Author Lisa Dodson is currently a professor of sociology at Boston College and has also taught public policy at Harvard.  She has presented her research in Congressional hearings, non-profit organizations and many universities.

Then, Pamela Madsen had an extremely successful career, was mother to two teenage boys, and was happily married to her high school sweetheart.  Seemingly, at age 42, she had it all.  Yet, she felt a growing sexual restlessness that wouldn’t let up, despite her lasting love for her spouse.  Deep down, she knew that she wanted more.  But what possibilities were available to her, outside of cheating on her husband, something she refused to do?  “Shameless” is Pamela’s memoir of her journey to personal healing and her search for sexual, spiritual and personal wholeness. 

The Moral Underground and Shameless are this week on Prime Time Radio.

Artist Max Ferguson

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Artist Max Ferguson and journalist Jimmy Breslin this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First renowned artist Max Ferguson talks about his ultra-realist style and his love of painting older folks and the rapidly disappearing scenes of New York City. He has worked on many series of paintings including Coney Island, subterranean scenery, nocturnal imagery, local artisans, and Jewish small businesses. "My work is essentially autobiographical," says Ferguson, with his two most frequent models being his father and himself, although almost all of his figures stand very singularly within a scene looking into the paintings and into themselves.

Then, the idea of integrating baseball began as a dream in the mind of Branch Rickey.  Finally, in 1947, as president and general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers, he defied racism on and off the field to bring Jackie Robinson into the major leagues, forever changing a sport and the nation.  Rickey's is a classic American tale of faith, idealism and a strong work ethic that took him to the pinnacle of success and earned him a place not only in the Baseball Hall of Fame but also in history.  Pulitzer prize-winning author and journalist, Jimmy Breslin remembers the man who revolutionized baseball.

The Art of Max Ferguson and Jimmy Breslin are this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Forgotten Founding Father

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Joshua Kendall and Marc Freedman this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small Noah Webster, more than just America’s greatest lexicographer, may have also been the country’s first nationalist. He helped to define American culture with many accomplishments often overshadowed by the creation of his dictionary.

In his new book, “The Forgotten Founding Father”, Joshua Kendall makes a convincing case that Webster was a key, yet forgotten, creator of American culture.  

Then, Marc Freedman’s book, “The Big Shift” argues that society is not acknowledging one simple obvious fact: While we are all getting older, most of us are not yet old. With decades of healthy living opening up between retirement and old age, there is a new stage of life, the encore stage.
Freedman explains why people in this new stage of life will soon be America’s largest and possibly most important demographic.

The Forgotten Founding Father and The Big Shift are this week on Prime Time Radio.

Play Your Best Golf Now

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:56

Lynn Marriott, Pia Nilsson and David de Rothschild, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First Lynn Marriott and Pia Nilsson, authors of “Play Your Best Golf Now” are also the innovators of the “VISION 54” approach to playing golf. They stand apart as unique coaches and are both internationally renowned experts on the mechanics of the golf swing.

Marriott and Nilsson’s inherent belief that the technical side of the game is just one of at least six essential elements that allow for peak performance. This elevates them from good to great and defines them as complete game coaches.

Then, David de Rothschild, “Plastiki” Eco-advocate and explorer recounts the extraordinary voyage of the Plastiki.  The six-person crew traveled 10,000 miles from San Francisco to Sydney, Australia.  Sailing through rarely traveled, dangerous waters, they risked their lives to call attention to the effect of floating plastic trash on our fragile oceans.

Golf and the sea, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Out of Practice: Fighting for Primary Health Care

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Frederick Barken and Cousin Brucie Morrow, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First primary care medicine is changing for the worse. With new health care reforms, patients will have less interaction with a Doctor. The most impacted medical field is primary care, an inherently slower, more personal, and uniquely tailored service. Consequently, patients are feeling helpless and alienated; losing a valued close connection with a doctor while health care becomes more transactional than relational.  Frederick Barken is fighting for traditional primary care in his book, “Out of Practice”. 

Then, The Beach Boys, The Byrds, The Rolling Stones, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Cream and Eric Clapton, Pink Floyd— Iconic radio DJ Cousin Brucie Morrow gives these rock legends and more their due in “ROCK & ROLL…And the Beat Goes On”. Cousin Brucie also pays tribute to historical milestones and pop cultural symbols by comparison to the music of the time. If that was not enough, he includes his list of the 250 most influential musicians and his Rock & Roll Dictionary.

Fighting for primary health care and rock & roll are this week on Prime Time Radio.

A Bittersweet Season

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Jane Gross and Margaret George, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, painful as the role reversal between parent and child may be, assume it is worse for a mother or father. How to handle the transition of parents from independence to the need for a caretaker is the theme of author Jane Gross’ book, “A Bittersweet Season”.

Then, Queen Elizabeth I was the Virgin Queen who had many suitors. She claimed victory over the Spanish Armada but still hated war. She could be aloof in court, but was engaging with the common people. This enigmatic queen’s life has perplexed and intrigued scholars for centuries including novelist, Margaret George, who explores the last thirty years of Queen Elizabeth’s reign in her latest work: “Elizabeth I”.

Jane Gross and Margaret George, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Tangled Webs: How False Statements are Undermining America

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

James B. Stewart and Christine Schwab, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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In his book, “Tangled Webs” author James B. Stewart dissects four recent perjury cases to show how false statements are affecting America.  The trials of Martha Stewart, Barry Bonds, Scooter Libby and Bernie Madoff prove that perjury and false statements are more commonplace in the media and society.  Mr. Stewart tells Prime Time Radio host, Mike Cuthbert why that, even though perjury is one of the oldest laws, it continues to be a very serious problem. 

Then, Christine Schwab details her struggle with Rheumatoid Arthritis in her memoir, “Take Me Home from the Oscars”.  She had worked exceptionally hard to earn her place in show business, uphold her public persona, and maintain a successful marriage at the same time.  Throughout it all, Christine hid her daily struggle with severe pain from nearly everyone.  In hopes of finding a permanent cure and dispelling the stigma society has attached to this crippling disease; Christine has become the spokesperson for The Arthritis Foundation.

James B. Stewart and Christine Schwab, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Crime Writer Jo Nesbo

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:51

Jo Nesbo and Sarah Vowell, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Jo Nesbo is a rock musician, crime novelist, and children’s book author.  Voted the best Norwegian crime story, his Detective Harry Hole novels have earned Mr. Nesbo unrivaled worldwide success.  He continues the series in “The Snowman”. The thriller begins with a young boy waking up only to discover his mother has disappeared at first snowfall of the season.  Outside the boy’s home Detective Harry Hole finds a snowman facing the house wearing the mother’s scarf and a threatening note.

Then, the queen of essays, Sarah Vowell gives a quirkily fresh look into the history of Hawaii in her book, “Unfamiliar Fishes”. This time she follows a new generation of New England Puritans as they sail around South America through the Pacific to Hawaii. Then wittily explains why the year the U.S. annexed Hawaii, 1898, is a major turning point in American history.

Jo Nesbo and Sarah Vowell, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Employee Benefits Security Administration

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Phyllis Borzi and Hiro Murata, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Phyllis Borzi, Assistant Secretary of the Employee Benefits Security Administration speaks about you can do now to protect your retirement savings, and what the Department of Labor is doing to protect consumers. The Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) is committed to educating and assisting the 150 million Americans covered by more than 718,000 private retirement plans, 2.6 million health plans; as well as plan sponsors and members of the employee benefits community.

 

Then, Professor Hiroyuki Murata speaks about the business of aging. In an aging nation with a mature economy like Japan, the public can no longer sustain the social security system based solely on public funds. He believes funding from sound businesses that make profits while serving a useful purpose will solve the problems related to our aging society. Rather than using already over extended public funds through such sources as government subsidies.

 

Phyllis Borzi and Hiro Murata, this week on Prime Time Radio.

A Singular Woman, President Obama’s Mother

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:49

Janny Scott and David McCullough, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, before she wrote the in-depth biography, “A Singular Woman: The Untold Story of Barrack Obama’s Mother”, award-winning reporter Janny Scott wrote an article for the New York Times about President Obama’s mother. The article emotionally moved people so much; Scott decided she needed to take a deeper look into the life of the fiercely independent Stanley Ann Dunham. Through extensive research and interviews, Janny Scott gives the world a look into the untraditional life of the woman who raised our current President.

Then, celebrated historian David McCullough’s book, “The Greater Journey” is the previously untold story of many American writers, doctors, artists, inventors, and others living in Paris between the years of 1830 and 1900.
Although these adventurous souls risked an arduous journey across the Atlantic, they began an even greater journey in the City of Light. Most had never left home or experienced a different culture. What they experienced in Paris would inspire them to excel in life. The art, theaters, operas and architecture they saw in Paris was as important to them as what they learned in their fields of work. As David McCullough writes, "Not all pioneers went west."

Janny Scott and David McCullough, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Big Fight of Sugar Ray Leonard

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:53

Sugar Ray Leonard and Dr. Loren Olson, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, you may equate the name Sugar Ray Leonard to fast, nearly choreographed moves that led him to multiple world title championships, an Olympic gold medal and two Golden Glove titles; but to him ­ the name represented so much more.

In his autobiography, "The Big Fight," Sugar Ray takes an honest look at his career and personal life and divulges all. He explains how alcoholism nearly cost him his second marriage and how his greatest fight didn¹t occur in the ring.

Then, after being married and fathering two children, Psychiatrist Dr. Loren Olson was still battling inner turmoil surrounding his sexuality. It wasn't until he hit age 40 that he came to terms with the fact that he's gay and made the painful choice to divorce and embark upon the journey of "coming out". In his book: "Finally Out: Letting Go of Living Straight," he takes a psychological look at why some gay men opt-to-live a straight life while also writing a personal memoir. For Olson, the transition took many years to complete, although he describes it as a journey that feels as if he's come home.

Sugar Ray Leonard and Dr. Loren Olson this week on Prime Time Radio.


The Blind Boys of Alabama

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

The Blind Boys of Alabama and Dr. Darrell Rigel, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, The Blind Boys of Alabama are the backbone of southern gospel music. That is because they have been singing hit songs since 1949. The original members attended the Alabama Institute for the Negro Blind in Talladega and began singing in local churches. Although they’ve had many opportunities to cross over into popular music over the years. The Blind Boys have always passed those opportunities by to continue their prolific career in gospel. Jimmy Carter, the only remaining original member says, “He was always going to sing gospel.”

Then, Dr. Darrell Rigel, clinical professor of Dermatology at New York University Medical Center talks about new sunscreen regulations and the dangers of various skin cancers. To help prevent Melanoma, sunscreens and sun blocks now need to protect from UV rays A and B, they need to print on the bottle how long they will last before becoming ineffective, and they need to specify whether they protect from dangerous broad-spectrum rays. Dr. Rigel also recommends using at least SPF 30 sunscreen that is water resistant for at least 80 minutes.

Blind Boys of Alabama and Dr. Darrell Rigel, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Wonder Girl: Babe Didrikson Zaharias

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Don Van Natta Jr. and David Baldacci, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Author Don Van Natta Jr. has now written a biography Babe Didrikson aptly titled, Wonder Girl: The Magnificent Sporting Life of Babe Didrikson Zaharias.  The book takes a detailed look at the life of one of the great sports pioneers of all time.

To say that she merely excelled at every sport she ever played may be an understatement. Babe knew it too, she was never afraid to brag. When she left high school to pursue her sports career she declared, "She would become the world's greatest athlete."

 Then, One Summer is a novel by acclaimed storyteller David Baldacci that is very close to his heart and family. Although it's a tale that is very different from his usual action packed page turners, it's still a story that is inspired by the most important relationship in his life, his relationship to his daughter.

Mr. Baldacci also discusses his other new novel, The Sixth Man. It explores some of the darkest corners of the government's most powerful agencies. An imprisoned serial killer is facing almost certain conviction when his attorney is murdered. A maze of disinformation, shady friends, and many obstacles threaten Sean King as he attempts to figure who killed his good friend and mentor.

Don Van Natta Jr. and David Baldacci, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Sweden's Progressive Stance on Social Security

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Ulf Kristersson and Platon, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small Minister of Social Security, Health and Social Affairs, Ulf Kristersson speaks about how Sweden is learning from the world while also setting an example with their healthcare system. He believes that national healthcare is a constitutional right. It is a system, which is a mix of public and privatized providers that work together under federal guidelines to provide coverage for all citizens regardless of age.

Although many of the individual photos have very different tones, Platon wanted to convey a sense of collective spirit in his book, POWER. It's a collection of 50 of the world's most influential leader's portraits. As a New Yorker Magazine staff photographer, he set up a small studio at a UN assembly, and attempted to photograph as many world leaders as he could get in front of his camera. To Platon, taking a portrait is about capturing the real essence of a person. With a healthy irreverence for authority, Platon tried to meet these larger than life leaders on a more personal level and draw out the humanity in them. 

 Ulf Kristersson and Platon, this week on Prime Time Radio.


Genius of Place

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Justin Martin and James Sullivan, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Author Justin Martin's new biography Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmstead looks into the life of the little known landscape architect who created some American icons. Frederick Law Olmstead was the man who designed Central Park, Prospect Park, The National Zoo, and the grounds of the Capitol building, just to name a few. Not only was Olmstead a landscape designer, he was an early writer for the NY Times, a farmer, and a devoted abolitionist.

Then, Author James Sullivan is a contributor to Rolling Stone and journalist for the San Francisco Chronicle. His book, 7 Dirty Words: The Life and Crimes of George Carlin offers an overview of the famed comedians early career and iconic routines. Seven Dirty Words is probably Carlin's most famous routine. Seven words used in the Bible and Shakespeare, but couldn't be said on television. Like his only real hero, Lenny Bruce, he liked to push the limits of what people discussed.

Justin Martin and James Sullivan, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Ethical Wisdom: What Makes Us Good… or Not

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Mark Matousek and Janice L. Jacobs, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Author Mark Matousek's book, Ethical Wisdom, is an insightful study of morality and ethics. Drawing on his thorough research, he argues that people are inherently ethical beings. 

Then, Janice L. Jacobs, Assistant Secretary of Consular Affairs, tells what the Department of State is doing to help older citizens while traveling abroad. She has much advice on the topic. She also explains many other topics that you may run into while planning to relocate or visit a foreign country.

Mark Matousek and Janice L. Jacobs, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Jane Fonda: Prime Time

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Jane Fonda and Patricia McArdle, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Jane Fonda gives an inspiring guide for living healthy and making the most of life in her book, "Prime Time". She offers inspiring insights to living well and successfully, especially in the second half of life. Jane Fonda explores sex, love, food, fitness, and self-awareness in the critical years from age 60 and beyond. She invites you to consider how to live a more insightful, understanding, and healthy life by doing a life review and cultivating new dreams and goals.

Then, Patricia McArdle has spent a lifetime in national service, including a career with the US State Department spanning nearly three decades. Her debut novel, "Farishta", is a compelling story that only someone with her personal experience could write. Set in Afghanistan, the book explores love, loss, and the effects of war. It is also a call to bring inexpensive renewable resources to Afghanistan and other third world countries. Patricia contends that electric infrastructure creation and oil development projects will do little in the end to help most Afghans, who still live at a subsistence level in rural areas.

Jane Fonda and Patricia McArdle, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Saying Goodbye: How Families Can Find Renewal through Loss

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Barbara Okun, Joseph Nowinski, and Nancy Rappaport, this week on Prime Time Radio

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, modern medical practices have changed the process of dying and as a result, the stages of grieving the loss of a loved one have changed too. Co-Authors Dr. Joseph Nowinski and Dr. Barbara Okun have explained what families can expect throughout this process in the book, "Saying Goodbye: How Families Can Find Renewal through Loss".

Then, in her memoir, "In Her Wake", child psychologist Nancy Rappaport grapples to understand why her mother would take her own life. Through many interviews with family members and friends, Nancy learns of her mother's conflicted and troubled socialite status in prominent Boston politics and grapples with what would cause someone to commit suicide. Nancy also walks us through her own journey of grief and loss to eventual healing.

Barbara Okun, Joseph Nowinski and Nancy Rappaport, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Is This Normal? The Essential Health Guide to Middle Age and Beyond

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:51

Dr. John Whyte and Lisa Ann Walter, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Dr. John Whyte, MD, is the chief medical expert and vice president of medical education at the Discovery Channel covers the health related issues of later life. Dr. Whyte provides a guide to all the most common questions and concerns that arise as we get older in his book, "Is this Normal?" from weight gain to hair loss and libido problems to memory loss.

Then, Actress and comic, Lisa Ann Walter encourages women to laugh at what they can't change, indulge some guilty pleasures, and accept themselves as they are right now. She both celebrates and bemoans feminity in her book, "The Best Thing about My Ass Is That It's Behind Me".

Dr. John Whyte and Lisa Ann Walter, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Affordable Care Act Special Documentary

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Affordable Care Act Special Documentary: The specifics of the Affordable Care Act.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, a special documentary that will clear up some of the confusion, misinformation and disinformation about the Affordable Care Act, signed in to law last year...Prime Time Radio takes a comprehensive look at the issues of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act from the policy makers to regular individuals already being impacted by the Act.

Then, Dr. John Coster, Senior Vice President of Government Affairs at the National Community Pharmacists Association discusses how the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will affect prescription drug costs for patients and what it might mean for pharmaceutical companies.

The Affordable Care Act Special and Dr. John Coster, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Tropic of Chaos and a Volunteer Story

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Christian Parenti and Alison Thompson, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Christian Parenti, an investigative journalist gives a tough analysis of the effects of climate change on some of the most vulnerable countries in his book, "Tropic of Chaos". These nations are now facing the crisis of climate change and have histories of economic and political disaster. Parenti focuses on the region of the planet that lies between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn. He expects nations in this area to face a catastrophic convergence of poverty and violence stemming from climate change and negligent foreign policy of the world super powers.

Then, Alison Thompson, a filmmaker living in New York City saw news reports of a 9.3 magnitude earthquake near Indonesia, triggering a massive tsunami that hit much of southern Asia. As she watched the death toll climb, Thompson had one thought: she had to go help.

 

In her book, "The Third Wave: A Volunteer Story", Thompson tells how, with only $300 in cash, some basic medical supplies; she headed to Sri Lanka along with a small team of volunteers and set up a refugee camp and hospital. She'd already learned that when disaster strikes, every single person can make a difference when she had volunteered help at the World Trade Center on 9/11 several years earlier.

 

Christian Parenti and Alison Thompson, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Economics and Life Gets Better

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Dean Baker and Wendy Lustbader, this week on Prime Time Radio

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Dean Baker is an acclaimed author and co-founder of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington DC. Often published in many major publications including the New York Times, Washington Post, and National Public Radio, his analyses give insight into our economic situation and feature commentary on current economic reporting. He sums up our current economy and the reality of how the government is handling decisions regarding national debt. Mr. Baker also talks at length about other topics that will affect boomers including Medicare policy and spending.

Then, Life Gets Better is a wonderfully written book that presents getting older as a joyful adventure in a society that idolizes youthfulness.  Author Wendy Lustbader has spent most of her career counseling the elderly as a social worker. This career experience has earned her a national reputation in the field of aging. She also explains the unexpected pleasures of growing older from her own personal perspective. "As we get older," Lustbader says, "we become more and more ourselves. We gain the confidence to say what we think and do what we want, focusing on what's really important in life."

Dean Baker and Wendy Lustbader, this week on Prime Time Radio.


Hospice Care and Age UK

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Joanne Lynn, Eleanor Clift, and Tom Wright, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Joanne Lynn and Eleanor Clift discuss the benefits of Hospice Care. Once diagnosed as terminal, patients and their families face many hard decisions. When it comes to an older patient such as a parent or spouse, these decisions can be especially hard. Hospice care offers relief for the dying by providing a medically trained caregiver to the patient. It can also prolong life and make it far more comfortable for a patient in their last days; encouraging people have a more meaningful time with family.

Then, Tom Wright, the newly appointed CCEO of Age UK talks about the ever-changing business of aging. He discusses his vision to support a quickly growing demographic, those over the age of 65. Age UK formed in 2010 when several age related charities merged together to better benefit the lives of older people in the UK.

Joanne Lynn, Eleanor Clift, and Tom Wright, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Hospice Care and Age UK

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Joanne Lynn, Eleanor Clift, and Tom Wright, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Joanne Lynn and Eleanor Clift discuss the benefits of Hospice Care. Once diagnosed as terminal, patients and their families face many hard decisions. When it comes to an older patient such as a parent or spouse, these decisions can be especially hard. Hospice care offers relief for the dying by providing a medically trained caregiver to the patient. It can also prolong life and make it far more comfortable for a patient in their last days; encouraging people have a more meaningful time with family.

Then, Tom Wright, the newly appointed CCEO of Age UK talks about the ever-changing business of aging. He discusses his vision to support a quickly growing demographic, those over the age of 65. Age UK formed in 2010 when several age related charities merged together to better benefit the lives of older people in the UK.

Joanne Lynn, Eleanor Clift, and Tom Wright, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Anthrax and Afghanistan

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:53

Jeanne Guillemin and Edward Girardet, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Jeanne Guillemin gives a definitive account of the anthrax investigation that became the most complex FBI investigation ever in her book: American Anthrax. The discovery of the deadly virus sent through the mail sent new waves of fear through an America that was still in shock from 9/11. These attacks caught federal agencies off guard and eventually killed five people.  

Then, Edward Girardet first began covering Afghanistan several months prior to the Soviet invasion in 1979 as a foreign correspondent for several large media outlets. His new book: Killing the Cranes, provides crucial insights into why the West's current involvement has turned into such a disaster. Using historical examples from the past thirty years, he explains why we are squandering billions of dollars on a recovery process that has shown scant success while creating new insurgency efforts.

Jeanne Guillemin and Edward Girardet, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Florence Henderson and the Boy Who Loved Batman

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Florence Henderson and Michael Uslan, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, for millions of people Carol Brady exemplifies the ideal of motherhood. She has also been America's favorite TV mom for decades. However, Florence Henderson's life was very different from the one later portrayed on television. In her new book, "Life is not a Stage", Florence opens up about her childhood, early career, and many challenges she has faced as an adult, including heart problems and hearing loss.  

Then, Michael Uslan recounts how he accomplished his lifelong dream of bringing Batman to the silver screen as a dark, brooding and serious character in his memoir, "The Boy Who Loved Batman". Uslan has always loved comic books, at least as long as he can remember. In fact, according his mother, he even learned to read from them. He finally got his break when he produced Batman with Jack Nicholson and Michael Keaton in 1989. Uslan has executive produced every Batman movie since.        

Florence Henderson and Michael Uslan, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Alzheimers And The Aging Brain

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Lily Tomlin, and Adam Gazzaley, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, from the recent AARP Life @ 50 Event in Los Angeles, a panel of five women discusses their experiences with family members that are suffering from Dementia and the newest research into Alzheimers disease. The panel of women includes actor and comedian Lily Tomlin, her partner Jane Wagner, the gossip columnist Liz Smith, publisher and agent Joni Evans and Dr. Rachel Schindler, an expert on Alzheimers disease. They are all frequent contributors to Women on the Web blog site. The conversation is wide-ranging and lively, from the latest developments in research to Tomlin's uncle and his personality changes in dementia.

Then, Dr. Adam Gazzaley leads one of the foremost brain research institutes in the world at UC San Francisco. From the recent AARP Life @ 50 Event in Los Angeles, he explains generally how brains work, what changes occur in the aging human brain, and how they differ from younger brains. Specifically, Dr. Gazzaley's research focuses on how the neural processes change as we age, the biology of memory and attention, and what factors can lead to dementia in older people. This research has provided many ways to prevent and alleviate memory and attention deficits.

Alzheimer panelists and Dr. Adam Gazzaley, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Aging Our Way

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Meika Loe, Alice Hasting Murphy, and Dr. Stephen Rose, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Aging Our Way
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AARP Radio

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, a study of the "oldest of the old", that is, those over the age of 85 shows that the elderly are not only coping with life but they are thriving. Meika Loe is a researcher from Colgate University who has spent a lot of time with the elderly. Her studies show that having social interaction with young people is a key factor in staying young at heart. Loe's book, "Aging Our Way", is a look into the lives of many of "the oldest of the old" including Alice Hasting Murphy's.

Then, Diabetes and macular degeneration are just two of the many age related diseases that can lead to blindness. Dr. Stephen Rose, Chief Research Officer for Foundation Fighting Blindness, explains many different forms of eye disease and ways to prevent or reverse these conditions. The Foundation Fighting Blindness employs many leading doctors that have made great breakthroughs in research to create drugs and even implants that forestall or even cure blindness.   

Meika Loe, Alice Hasting Murphy, and Dr. Stephen Rose, this week on Prime Time Radio.

True Strength and the Puppy Diaries

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Kevin Sorbo and Jill Abramson, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, while he was at the pinnacle of his career, a sudden health crisis left Kevin Sorbo partially blind and incapacitated at just thirty-eight years old. He hid the full details about his health from the press and continued to film Hercules, which was the number one TV series in the world. In his inspiring memoir, True Strength, Sorbo shares the story of the crisis that ultimately redefined his measure of success.

Then, in The Puppy Diaries, Jill Abramson perfectly captures the experience of having a balanced and fulfilling relationship with her canine friends, Buddy and Scout. She tells her story of unconditional companionship in such a meaningful and emotional way to which we all will relate. Experience the laughter and the difficulties of raising a young puppy, as Jill describes in intimate and relatable details the impact of Scout on her home, her family and herself.

Kevin Sorbo and Jill Abramson, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Looming National Budget Cuts Deadline and Medicare

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:50

Former Sen. John Breaux, former Rep. Billy Tauzin and Tom Brokaw, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Medicare is one of the biggest expenditures in the national budget. Over the next month, a bi-partisan Congressional Super-Committee has to decide how to cut 1.5 trillion dollars from the national budget. If the committee doesn't make the deadline, automatic cuts will be made across the board which will affect different expenditures on the budget in proportion to their size. Former Senator John Breaux and former Representative Billy Tauzin discuss how healthcare reform and budget cuts could affect Medicare.

Then, Has America simply wandered off course, or have we dug a hole from which can't climb out? Tom Brokaw asks this question and many others in his new book, "The Time of Our Lives". He believes various private interests funneling money into our political system has caused a national divide that has distracted us from a sense of common good. This decline in values has also caused a loss of nationalistic pride making us an easy target for hijackers who could steer our country down a destructive path. Brokaw does believe, however, that we can regain our national confidence and learn to interact in an ever-crowded world. Brokaw engages in a conversation about our country, offering many ideas for how we can revitalize the promise of the American Dream.

Former Sen. Breaux, former Rep. Tauzin and Tom Brokaw, this week on Prime Time Radio.

I Didn’t Ask to Be Born (But I’m Glad I was)

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Bill Cosby and Tony Horwitz, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, in his hilarious new collection of observations, Bill Cosby brings us more of his wonderful and wacky insights into the human condition that are sure to become classics. In the tradition of Fat Albert, Cosby introduces a host of new characters, including Peanut Armhouse and Old Mother Harold. Not since Mushmouth, Dumb Donald, Bucky, and the Cosby Kids has there been such a memorable cast.

Then, in his new book, "Midnight Rising", award-winning journalist Tony Horwitz takes us deep inside the mind of a troubled abolitionist. John Brown believed an already polarized America needed a shocking event that would start a civil liberation movement. Plotted in secret, launched in the dark, Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry ruptured the union between North and South. Yet few Americans know the true story of the militant idealists who invaded Virginia.

Bill Cosby and Tony Horwitz, this week on Prime Time Radio.


What Would Ben Stein Do?

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Ben Stein and Robert Frank, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Ben Stein would never marry someone who refused to work or had a drug problem. He would not arrive late to an appointment. Those would be horrendous choices. He treats his wife as the most important person in the world. He's fairly certain he wouldn't pierce any part of his face. In his new book, "What Would Ben Stein Do", he discusses a wide range of topics including politics and marriage. Mr. Stein applies his knowledge and wisdom from his days as a speechwriter for Richard Nixon, to his tough relationship with his mother as he tackles the challenges of modern life. 

Then, Robert Frank uses a wide variety of analogies, including the antlers of a Bull Elk and mandatory helmet rules for hockey players, to explain why what is good for one is not always good for all. He then goes on to explain why competitive spending can lead to large-scale problems in a national economy and suggests small unobtrusive changes in taxation policy that could save billions of dollars in his book, "Darwin Economics".

Ben Stein and Robert Frank, this week on Prime Time Radio.

One Love and Sweet Judy Blue Eyes

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:50

Cedella Marley and Judy Collins, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, One Love brings the joyful spirit and unforgettable lyrics of one of Bob Marley's most beloved songs to life. Adapted by Cedella Marley, this heartwarming picture book offers an upbeat parable of the amazing things that happen when we all get together with love in our hearts. The story follows one little girl who enlists her community in transforming her neighborhood for the better as she dances to the beat and spreads the positive feeling of change.

Then, Judy Collins' beautiful voice and lyrics have captivated audiences for decades. She has done thoughtful interpretations of so many songs from all genres. Each time she performed, she made a song her own in a unique way that won her many awards. Collins has done so again with a musical picture book for children titled, "When You Wish Upon a Star".

Cedella Marley and Judy Collins, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Financial Advice from AARP's Life @ 50 Conference

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Anna Cabral and Bill Vlasic, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small If you look on any of your paper bills in your wallet, you'll find the signature of Anna Escobedo Cabral, former Treasurer of the United States. Go on and check, you know you want to. She joins Prime Time Radio host, Mike Cuthbert in Los Angles to discuss the importance of saving for retirement. According to Cabral The most important question one must ask when organizing their retirement portfolio is, "besides social security income, how much additional funding will I need to live?"

Learn a few tips to actively save for retirement and safely build equity during these difficult economic times.

Over the past decade, the American auto industry has financially struggled, nearly collapsed, and is finally on its way to recovery. Author Bill Vlasic, the Detroit bureau chief for the New York Times, gives a detailed account of the American auto industry's fight for survival in his new book, "Once Upon a Car".
 
Two of the iconic big three auto manufacturers, General Motors and Chrysler's recovery is still uncertain, even after receiving financial assistance from the federal government. Ford, on the other hand, is starting to thrive after dealing with economic hardships on its own. Mr. Vlasic offers many new insights into why Ford managed to avoid bankruptcy and examines the effects that the failures of these companies will have on the national economy.

Anna Cabral and Bill Vlasic, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Bells of the National Cathedral - Holiday Special

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:01:58

Edward Nassor, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small The historic Washington National Cathedral sustained significant damage from an earthquake that struck the eastern seaboard on August 23. To celebrate the resilient spirit and hope of the holiday season, join us for an hour-long special featuring the beautiful bells of the cathedral's carillon.  Host Mike Cuthbert ascended the bell tower and sat in the "wheelhouse" with distinguished carillonneur Edward Nassor who melodiously played the bells expressly for Prime Time Radio.  He and Mike also had a fascinating conversation about the history and workings of the bells.

Edward Nassor, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Culture of Political Scandal in Washington DC

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:51

Lawrence Lessig and Mark Feldstein, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, More people believe now that money buys results in American politics than ever before. Specifically, Congress has a dependency on the flow of money from a select few private interest groups. These groups believe that because they are extremely rich, they are also entitled to buy influence. In his book, "Republic Lost", Lawrence Lessig explains how money corrupts the government and lays out a plan to stop it permanently.

Then, The scandal culture of Washington politics did not start with President Nixon and Newsman Jack Anderson media battle. However, their struggle for power forever changed how politicians and the media interact. Both Richard Nixon and Jack Anderson's were very religious men from volatile families. Both men also served in the military and were very ambitious. Mark Feldstein recounts their bitter confrontation that includes blackmail, bribery, and assassination plots in his book "Poisoning the Press".

Lawrence Lessig and Mark Feldstein, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Don’t Bite Your Tongue Off

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Ruth Nemzoff and Carol V. Aebersold, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, parents make enormous sacrifices helping children become healthy and autonomous adults. When children are older, popular wisdom advises parents to let go, disconnect, and bite their tongues. Increasing life spans mean that parents and children can spend as many as five or six decades as adults together: actively parenting adult children is a reality for many families. Family expert Ruth Nemzoff encourages parents to have close relationships with their grown children while respecting them as adults in her book, "Don't Bite Your Tongue Off".

Then, the elf sitting on the shelf can fly, and talk, and see; of course he'd never let you catch him doing any of these things. But every night he reports naughty and nice deeds back to Santa. At least that was the family tradition in Carol V. Aebersold's home. Not too long after Thanksgiving, a little elf named Fisbee would appear on a shelf or anywhere he had a good view of the household. And every morning he'd be in a new spot.

Ruth Nemzoff and Carol V. Aebersold, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Love for Grownups

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Love for Grownups and Dan Marino, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, in their book "Love for Grownups", three good friends who met and married wonderful men later in life tell how they found love and got married. They pass on the wisdom of their learning through the true stories and real-life strategies these women, plus the dozens of others they interviewed, used to meet the right guy, fall in love and create exciting, happy and fulfilling lives.

Then, the Dan Marino Foundation was established by Dan and Claire Marino in 1992, it's mission is to create awareness and opportunities for the autism and special needs communities. The Foundation fulfills this mission by supporting comprehensive integrated treatment programs, providing outreach services, advancing scientific research, and building independence through employment and daily living transition programs. The Foundation funds quality-of-life research, build the Miami Children's Hospital Dan Marino Center and opening in the fall of 2012, the Dan Marino Foundation Vocational Campus. 

Love for Grownups and Dan Marino, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Becoming Dr. Q

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:56

Dr. Q and Mark Bauerlein, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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AARP Radio

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, he is known as Dr. Q, an internationally renowned neurosurgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital and leads cutting-edge research to cure brain cancer. However, at 19 years old, he was just Freddy, an undocumented migrant working in the tomato fields of California. In an enthralling memoir, "Becoming Dr. Q", Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa tells his amazing life story, from his impoverished childhood in a tiny Mexican village, through two harrowing border crossings and his transformation to gifted student at the University of California at Berkeley and at Harvard Medical School.

Then, in his book, "The Digital Divide", Mark Bauerlein dissects the pros and cons of increasingly digital culture. He weighs in on many of the issues that new media raises from how it affects attention span and reading habits, to cyber-bullying. Mr. Bauerlein also frames many other issues such as online privacy, protecting our children in a digital world, and the generational divide in a insightful way that will help everyone make more informed decisions about the place technology holds in their lives. 

Dr. Q and Mark Bauerlein, this week on Prime Time Radio.

You Can Heal Yourself

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Dr. Oliver Sacks and Dr. Julie Silver, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, what would you do if you lost the ability to speak? How would survive if one of your five senses did not function normally? For instance, if you lost all depth perception or the ability to recognize faces or shapes, would you enjoy a painting more? Without depth perception, acclaimed neurosurgeon, Dr. Oliver Sacks, actually enjoys viewing a painting even more.   

In his book, "The Mind's Eye", Dr. Sacks discusses how people are able to survive, communicate, and excel in life despite having lost what most of us consider indispensable perceptions and senses. For these people, whose senses function differently, there is a great challenge to adapt to a new way of being in the world.

Then, a serious injury or illness can make even the healthiest and toughest people feel helpless, especially when it comes to cancer.  However, people can be very resilient once we set our minds to accomplishing something. This includes healing quickly.  

Dr. Julie Silver, assistant medical professor at Harvard Medical School, is also a cancer survivor. She overcame many recovery challenges when her treatments caused her much pain and left her very weak. Learn the most effective and current methods for recovering from illness and injury. A unique self-care guide that include, self-assessments and strategy plans to help you evaluate your condition and progress your recovery in her book, "You Can Heal Yourself".

Dr. Oliver Sacks and Dr. Julie Silver, this week on Prime Time Radio.

De-cluttering the Hoarder in You

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Dr. Robin Zasio and Susan Orlean, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, emotional attachments to our belongings can spiral out of control and evolve into a condition called compulsive hoarding. It is close to impossible for hoarders to relinquish their precious objects, even if it means that stuff takes over their lives and their homes. In her book, "The Hoarder in You", psychologist Dr. Robin Zasio, explains how to de-clutter your home and how to avoid becoming a compulsive hoarder.

Then, Susan Orlean recounts the journey of an orphaned puppy found on a battlefield to a legendary movie star in her book, "Rin Tin Tin, The Life and Legend". She has always loved Rin Tin Tin and his television adventures. When she realized Rin Tin Tin was not just a character she came to understand that this was not just a story about a dog, or even the many different dogs that make up the Rin Tin Tin legacy; this is a story about a beloved icon in American popular culture.

Dr. Robin Zasio and Susan Orlean, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Kurt Vonnegut: And So It Goes

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:52

Charles Shields and Andrea Stern Ferris, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, the life of Kurt Vonnegut resonates with all ages of readers from the Boomer generation that experienced the Vietnam War to college students that are discovering his work for the first time. Charles Shields, Vonnegut's biographer, discusses the author's complexities and explores his political and cultural impact.

Then, the LUNGevity Foundation's vision is to create a world where no one suffers from lung cancer. The foundation has brought together brilliant scientific minds and passionate advocates to lead the way in cutting-edge research to cure lung cancer. Although most people diagnosed with lung cancer quickly die from it, Andrea Stern Ferris, president of LUNGevity, is doing all she can to raise awareness of the dangers of lung cancer.

Charles Shields and Andrea Stern Ferris, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Zydeco Nation, A Black History Month Special

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:02:45

Prime Time Radio's Black History Month Special: Zydeco Nation.

Thierry001_small AARP's Prime Time Radio Black History Month Special documentary traces how the Louisiana Creole music known as zydeco found a new home 2,000 miles from its birthplace. Independent producers Richard Ziglar and Barry Yeoman interviewed the people who migrated from Louisiana to California starting in World War II to escape the racial discrimination prevalent in the South and find jobs in the shipping and defense industries. Once in California, they worked hard to keep their culture alive, especially their musical traditions.

The musicians and dancers who underwent this migration tell their stories of rebuilding their lives and their community. And they talk about how younger musicians are transmitting zydeco to the next generation-in the hopes that Creole traditions will continue to thrive in California.

We hope you enjoy AARP's Prime Time Radio Black History Month Special: Zydeco Nation, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Marriage Confidential and Trust

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Pamela Haag and Mary Ellen O’Toole, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, modern marriages are usually multiform arrangements that no longer look like the institutions that the former generation may be familiar. However, traditional marriage has not become obsolete but evolved to adapt to the post-romantic mindset of the 21st century. Pamela Haag looks at the reasons marriage is changing and gives advice on how to get the most out of your marriage, no matter how you define your relationship.

Then, fear cannot always save you when you find yourself in a dangerous situation. Even your own survival instincts should not always be trusted to get you out of danger. Former FBI profiler and leading expert on psychopathy, Mary Ellen O'Toole, is more than qualified to explain the many different methods to determine if someone is lying to you or is a trustworthy person. She explains many methods currently taught to law enforcement officers to help them keep a clear head during conflict and avoid dangerous situations.

Pamela Haag and Mary Ellen O'Toole, this week on Prime Time Radio.

A Conversation with Dick Gregory

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:53

Dick Gregory, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small Entertainer Dick Gregory is so much more than a comedian, although he has made a career of stand-up comedy. More importantly, he is a social activist and a pioneer of the civil rights movement.  Mr. Gregory has involved himself in championing social fairness as early as his high school days, in which he protested a policy that publicized only the white winners of sports events. He still is heavily involved in activism today, especially the building of education programs for underprivileged children in St. Louis.  

The veteran entertainer and activist tells tales of his childhood, his first gig at the Playboy Club, and how meeting Dr. Martin Luther King changed his life forever, all while imparting his life wisdom, in this special Black History Month program.

Dick Gregory, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Alzheimers and Two Women of Little Rock

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

David Hyde Pierce and David Margolick, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, David Hyde Pierce's longest-running role to date has been as an advocate for Alzheimer's disease awareness. This month he celebrates his 13th year as honorary member of the board of the Alzheimer's Association. Best known as Niles Crane, the character he played for over a decade on NBC's hit sitcom Frasier, Pierce originally got involved with the Alzheimer's cause for very personal reasons. Because he feels passionately about finding a cure, he works tirelessly to raise awareness and fund research.

Then, on the first day of school outside Little Rock Central High School in 1957, a photograph was taken of two girls, Elizabeth and Hazel. This photograph came to represent a pivotal moment in the civil rights movement, school desegregation. It also bonded the lives of these two girls forever. In his book, "Two Women of Little Rock", author David Margolick tells the story of the bond between Elizabeth and Hazel that developed from the iconic photograph.

David Hyde Pierce and David Margolick, this week on Prime Time Radio.

A Look at the For Profit Health Insurance Industry

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Wendell Potter and Susan Garland, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, in "Deadly Spin", author and insurance company insider, Wendell Potter, speaks out on how corporate PR is killing health care and deceiving Americans. Since Wendell Potter walked away from his executive position at a top health insurance company in May of 2008, he has worked tirelessly as an outspoken critic of corporate PR and the distortion and fear manufactured by America's health insurance industry. A PR juggernaut funded by millions of dollars, the health insurance industry bankroll rivals lobbying budgets and underwriting many "non-partisan" grassroots organizations.

Then, Susan Garland, executive editor of the Kiplinger Retirement Report, says a decline in the ability to handle finances well could be an early sign of Alzheimer's disease making older Americans more vulnerable to money scams. The health care costs of retirement for a 65-year-old living until 92 will likely pay $400,000 in out-of-pocket medical costs. Tips on how to prepare to pay the tab, from buying special types of annuities to using reverse mortgages.

Wendell Potter and Susan Garland, this week on Prime Time Radio.


Are You Smart Enough to Work at Google?

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Stacy Cordury and Bill Poundstone, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, the Girl Scouts of the USA is the largest and most beloved organization for girls and women in the country. In this exciting new biography of its founder, Juliette Gordon Low, Stacy Cordery tells the story of the intrepid, charming, and idiosyncratic woman at its core. Juliette, or "Daisy," as she was called, struggled to reconcile her training as a good Southern belle with her desire to run barefoot through the fields.

Then, Bill Poundstone guides readers through the surprising solutions to dozens of the most challenging interview questions asked by today's top companies. His book, Are You Smart Enough to Work at Google?, covers the importance of creative thinking, ways to get a leg up on the competition, what your social media page really says about you, and much more.

Stacy Cordury and Bill Poundstone, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Advantage of American Innovation

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Adam Segal and Ira Rheingold, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, author Adam Segal argues that China and India are a bit overrated economically. While Asian countries output products in very large quantities, they are behind the curve when it comes to invention. Segal analyzes how American companies can overcome the Asian challenge by using innovation. His book, The Advantage, is an in-depth look at how the United States can succeed in the technological race with Asia. In Segal's analysis, the United States is the world's frontrunner when it comes to innovation and invention of new products.

Then, the Federal government plans to compensate consumers for fraudulent bank practices involving housing mortgages. Ira Rheingold, the executive director of the National Association of Consumer Advocates explains many ways that the government will help protect consumers and help banks with unpaid housing loans that have gone to foreclosure.

Adam Segal and Ira Rheingold, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Guidelines for the Married and Coupled Up

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Harriet Lerner and Michael Addis, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, we all know that relationships can be complex. We also know that with effort, any relationship can be great. It is not always easy to figure out how to apply the effort. In her book, Marriage Rules, Harriet Lerner translates decades of her experiences in clinical practice to give clear, practical advice and guidelines that will improve any relationship. Lerner concludes that any relationship can be great with a little humor, some time, and a lot of understanding.    

Then, combining scientific research and his clinical experiences, psychologist Michael Addis explains an epidemic of cultural problems caused by the widespread hiding of men's vulnerabilities. His book, Invisible Men, looks at the increasing statistics of suicide, alcohol abuse, and violence among men. Addis' research reveals the continued cost of staying silent when emotional, physical, or spiritual pain enters men's lives and he provides many solutions that start on a personal and relational level.

Harriet Lerner and Michael Addis, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Man Seeks God

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Eric Weiner and Sergio Luzzatto, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Man Seeks God
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AARP Radio

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, journalist Eric Weiner, searches the far reaches of the globe for signs of the divine. After a health scare hospitalizes him and a doctor asks him if he'd found his god yet, Weiner finds that it's a question he can't shake from his mind. Ultimately prompting him to explore many religions and find his own spiritual perspective.

Then, Sergio Luzzatto investigates the facts and myths of the life of Padre Pio. From the earliest letters of Pio and evidence of a secret delivery of acid, possibly used to create marks of stigmata to the politics surrounding the life of this modern saint, Luzzatto leaves no dark corner unexplored in his biography of Padre Pio.

Eric Weiner and Sergio Luzzatto, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Outsmarting the Scam Artist

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Doug Shadel and Jonathan Peterson, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, U.S. consumers lose billions of dollars to scams. Anyone can fall victim to scams and fraud, however many scam artists target the 50+ age group. AARP's Doug Shadel discusses the techniques scam artists use to get people thinking impulsively. He offers much practical advice on how to avoid these scams and fraud to protect your money and assets, as well as the assets of parents and loved ones. Shadel, the expert on scams and fraud, shares a wealth of information to help you in his book, "Outsmarting the Scam Artist".

Then, to help you better understand and claim your Social Security benefits, Jonathan Peterson, covers the history, regulations, and recent changes to Social Security. He gives many tips to on understanding, navigating, and most efficiently working with Social Security Administration to claim your benefits. Peterson's book, "Social Security for Dummies", is a wealth of information to insure you're receiving the maximum benefits.   

Doug Shadel and Jonathan Peterson, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Pharmageddon

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Dr. Ira Byock and Dr. David Healy, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Pharmageddon
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Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Dr. Ira Byock explains how to ensure the best possible care for those we love who are dying. In his book, "The Best Care Possible", he emphasizes we must not only remake our healthcare system, we must also move past our cultural aversion to talking about dying and acknowledge the fact of mortality. In so doing, we can live better lives from beginning to end.

Then, in his book, "Pharmageddon", Dr. David Healy makes an argument against the pharmaceuticalization of medicine, dissecting problems in health care that are leading to a growing number of deaths and disabilities. Dr. Healy draws attention to the suicide-inducing side effects of many lifestyle drugs. He argues that our current state of affairs to three key factors: product rather than process patents on drugs, the classification of certain drugs as prescription-only, and industry-controlled drug trials.

Dr. Ira Byock and Dr. David Healy, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Bishop T.D. Jakes on Letting It Go

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, Bishop T.D. Jakes discusses the necessity for forgiveness in life then, Henry Alford covers modern manners...or the lack there of... this week on Prime Time Radio.

T First, the idea of forgiveness is contrary to our basic human nature in these unforgiving times of litigiousness, negative media, and political smear campaigns. Bishop T.D. Jakes, author of "Let It Go", admonishes that forgiveness is a gift and choice that will free us to experience the full potential of our lives and relationships.

Then, Henry Alford asks what modern etiquette looks like in an age of instant gratification in his book, "Would it Kill You to Stop Doing That?". Alford interviews many experts on etiquette and habits from Tim Gunn to an army sergeant. He plays a game called Touch the Waiter and travels to Japan to examine the culture he dubs the Fort Knox of manners.

Bishop T.D. Jakes and Henry Alford, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The One: The Life of James Brown

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

RJ Smith discusses the life and music of the Godfather of Soul and Jay Kirk discusses the man who revolutionized taxidermy and fought wild animals with his bare hands, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, author RJ Smith covers the colorful life and musical genius of the Godfather of Soul, James Brown in his definitive biography, "The One". Drawing on interviews by many people that knew him well, Smith covers much more than James Brown's unconventional upbringing in extreme poverty, and his rise to musical fame. Many fascinating findings on Brown's life are explored from his involvement in the Civil Rights movement, to his entrepreneurial endeavors, and his high profile friendships, give insight into the life of the most innovative musician of our time.

Then, during age of safaris and exploration in the early twentieth century, Carl Akeley set out to preserve the world's great animals. Author Jay Kirk gives an amazing account of an extraordinary life lived during remarkable times in his book, "Kingdom Under Glass". Kirk follows the adventures of an artistic genius who not only revolutionized taxidermy, but changed museums by creating life like dioramas such as the ones visited by millions today at New York's Museum of Natural History.

RJ Smith and Jay Kirk, this week on Prime Time Radio.

You Have No Idea: The Life of Vanessa Williams

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Vanessa and Helen Williams share a wealth of motherly wisdom just in time for Mother's Day then, a former models amazing recovery and hilarious struggle with being uninsured after a serious accident...this week on Prime Time Radio.

Vanessa_helen_williams_120419_small First,  Vanessa Williams was a typical teen. She enjoyed performing, singing, dancing and like most other teens, she slightly rebelled against her no-nonsense mother, Helen. In 1983, Vanessa never imagined that she’d wind-up the first African-American Miss America. In fact, when initially invited to participate in the prestigious pageant, her only thought was how the competition would interrupt her acting career and prevent her from attending a musical theater school in London. “You Have No Idea,” the co-authored book by Helen and Vanessa Williams, truly encompasses the inner workings of their mother-daughter relationship, and what they had to go through to make it to the other side. Helen shares stories of how she had to protect her daughter from death threats, while Vanessa expresses gratitude to her fiercely wise mother, and all of her teachings on life. 

Then,  Hogan Gorman had been modeling all over Europe before she decided to settle down and pursue an acting career in New York City. Once she transitioned to the US, she became the typical aspiring actress: she took auditions and classes during the day and waitressed at night! Things were moving right along, until the uninsured actress got struck by a car traveling forty-miles per hour. The accident left her mostly crippled and with short-term memory loss. To make matters worse, she had no health insurance. Her book: “Hot Cripple” is the story of her uninsured fight with the healthcare system, her struggle to rebuild her career, and her success in maintaining a positive attitude in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds. 

Vanessa and Helen Williams and Hogan Gorman, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Dan Rather: A Rather Outspoken Memoir

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Contemporary news icon Dan Rather shares the ups and downs of his career in his memoir, “Rather Outspoken”; and author, Christopher Bram gives the history of gay writers in American literature and explores their cultural impact in “Eminent Outlaws”.... This week on Prime Time Radio.

Rather_outspoken_small Dan Rather has had one of the most distinguished and even sometimes controversial careers in journalism. His long-standing career has taken him from local fame in Texas, through the ranks of CBS News and 60 Minutes to today, where he's the managing editor and anchor on "Dan Rather Reports".  His judgment has been questioned, most famously for how he used the Killian Documents in a story. But, however you examines Mr. Rather, his record speaks for itself...he's earned every major journalism award, even with an outspoken personality. In his memoir,  "Rather Outspoken," Rather sheds light on some of his most controversial and iconic moments in his career.

Gore Vidal, Truman Capote, Tennessee Williams, and Allen Ginsburg have all made a major impact on American literature and theater. They are a few of the first wave of gay writers to gain literary fame after World War II, during a time when homosexuality was illegal. The cultural impact of these and other writers is said to be a part of the foundation for such monumental social changes as the legalization of same-sex marriage. Author, Christopher Bram examines the influence and histories of these writers and more in his book, "Eminent Outlaws".

Dan Rather and Christopher Bram, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Maya Angelou Center for Women’s Health and Wellness

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Journalist Blaine Harden tells the harrowing story of a man's escape from North Korean prison, Camp 14. Then, Dr. Maya Angelou discusses her newest project, The Maya Angelou Center for Women’s Health and Wellness.

Miss_angelou_019_small First, Shin Dong-hyuk was born in North Korea in a brutal prison camp called, Camp 14. He grew up in the camp, where he witnessed too many inhumane horrors to list. Shin knew nothing of the outside world, had never heard of Kim Jong, or realized that food was cooked and enjoyed in other parts of the world. He was raised without love, and he regarded his mother as merely competition for food. In fact, he reported his mother to guards for talking of plans to escape. In return, the guards made Shin watch as they shot her, and then tortured him for four days. He never considered escaping until he heard stories that food was plentiful and cooked in the outside world. Eventually, he did escape, at least physically; emotionally he is dealing with extreme guilt and post-traumatic stress syndrome for the first time in his life.  Journalist Blaine Harden tells the unbelievable story of the life of Shin in his book, "Escape from Camp 14".

Some may remember her for her dramatic roles in film and theater. We now know her for her poem, On the Pulse of the Morning, which she delivered at the inauguration of President Clinton and her masterpiece of literature, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. Always evolving toward her ultimate art form, Dr. Maya Angelou now most profoundly influences the world with her writing. Yet, throughout her career, she was always involved in civil rights. Dr. Maya Angelou became friends with a young Malcolm X and worked for Dr. Martin Luther King. Even James Baldwin influenced her to turn to writing as a career.

Stemming from her involvement in civil rights and fueled by her love for all humanity, she has always worked tirelessly to span the gaps of race and gender.  Now Dr. Maya Angelou is working on another project, the Maya Angelou Center for Women's Health and Wellness, located in her hometown of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The goals of the center are educating women on healthy living and achieving equality in women's health care.

Blaine Harden and Dr. Maya Angelou, this week on Prime Time Radio.



The New Feminist Agenda

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, Madeleine Kunin, advocates women take active roles in politics in her book, “The New Feminist Agenda”. Then, former Senator and NBA athlete, Bill Bradley, gives many ideas on how we can all work to improve America in his book, “We Can All do Better”. This week on Prime Time Radio.

New_feminist_agenda_small First, More American women are attending medical and law schools now, than ever before. The two-income family is the normal standard for the modern American family. The role of women in society has changed drastically for the better; however, the social support system for working women and their families has changed very little.

Former governor of Vermont, Madeleine Kunin, examines how America has progressed in gender equality at home and in the work place. She also advocates major changes for how we invest in family care in her book, "The New Feminist Agenda". 

Then, more than ever, China has long-term economic plans that threaten America's dominance in the new global economy. India is also growing quickly as a world economic power. Congressional approval ratings are at an all time low with gridlocked bipartisanship blocking federal decision making at nearly every turn. Big money flows into the pockets of many policy makers to influence them to private interest group's agendas. However, Senator Bill Bradley argues that the problem is not the government. He says it is everyone's responsibility to cooperate and improve our great nation in his book, "We Can All Do Better".

Madeleine Kunin and Bill Bradley, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Retirement on the Line

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

In her book, “Retirement on the Line” Caitrin Lynch explains how The Vita Needle Company values older workers. And, Evan Falchuk, the Vice Chairman of Best Doctors, discusses how his company is fighting misdiagnosis. This week on Prime Time Radio.

Retirement_on_the_line_cover_small First, family owned manufacturing company, Vita Needle, has a unique commitment to an aging workforce. The average age of an employee is seventy-four and the oldest employee, Rosa, is one hundred years old...and still going strong. She takes pride in her work on the production line and enjoys the chance to interact with other employees.   

In the book, "Retirement on the Line," author, Caitrin Lynch, uses her experience at Vita Needle to analyze the company's commitment to an aging workforce and the employee's dedication, to change society's perspective of working in retirement.

Then, created by physicians with a passion to reduce misdiagnosis, the purpose of the Best Doctors is to supplement health care and improve the overall quality of medical treatment. Another of the company's goals is to provide patients more time with doctors. Evan Falchuk, Vice Chairman of the company, explains how their work has the potential to improve health in local communities by connecting patients with the correct experienced physicians or specialists. The company also will give second opinions to patients, which helps them feel confident about their health decisions, especially when facing tough medical conditions.

Caitrin Lynch and Even Falchuk, this week on Prime Time Radio.


The Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, Andrew Marr gives the fascinating story of Queen Elizabeth II, England’s second longest reigning monarch, on her Diamond Jubilee. Then, Brigadier-General Abrams discusses the Army Historical Foundation and the new National Museum of the United States Army.

The_real_elizabeth_small First, her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II has been at the pinnacle of the British Monarch for the last sixty years. One of the longest reigning monarchs in England's history, Elizabeth became queen at the age of twenty-five. In his book, "The Real Elizabeth", Andrew Marr gives an intimate glimpse at the fascinating story of one of England's longest reigning monarch on the celebration of her Diamond Jubilee.

Then, the history of the United States Army is fundamental to the history of our country and out national values. Yet unlike the other branches of the military, there is no one place that historical documents and artifacts are preserved. The Army Historical Foundation headed by Brigadier-General Creighton Abrams and military historian Jody Davis, have collaborated with the US Army to create the National Museum of the United States Army. The state of the art facility will celebrate the Army's contributions to America and honor the sacrifices of men and women that have faithfully served.

Andrew Marr, Creighton Abrams and Jody Davis, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Good Food Revolution

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

In his memoir, “Good Food Revolution”, Will Allen describes his plan to provide healthy, affordable food to poor urban communities. Then, historian Deborah Davis discusses the scandal that followed Teddy Roosevelt’s White House dinner invitation to Booker T. Washington in her book, “Guest of Honor”. This week on Prime Time Radio.

Will-allen_small First, Will Allen describes his passion and plan to provide healthy, affordable food to poor urban communities. Allen resolved to change this phenomenon by buying derelict greenhouses near a poor Milwaukee housing project and founded Growing Power. His organization employs young people from nearby communities and teaches them the principles of farming while providing them with affordable healthy food. Allen's memoir, "The Good Food Revolution", tells the story of how his passion grew from a seed of an idea to an organization that is changing the way America eats.

Then, in 1901, President Theodore Roosevelt invited Booker T. Washington to dine with the first family at the White House. Washington accepted the invitation, which was the first time a black man had ever been invited to dine at the White House. By the next day, negative newspaper headlines reported the dinner, bashing the reputations of both men. However, there are many similarities and parallels in the lives of the two great men. Historian Deborah Davis not only gives an in depth profile of the ramifications of the dinner in her book, "Guest of Honor", but also shows how much social equality has improved over the last century.

Will Allen and Deborah Davis, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Dear Cary

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, “Dear Cary” is Dyan Cannon’s memoir that is honest about her healing process by exposing her pain from past relationships. Then, Neil Sedaka has been successful in the music business for over fifty-five years. It’s an accomplishment he attributes to hard work and a willingness to reinvent his career.

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Mike_ptr_thumb_small First, Dyan Cannon was a young actress just starting her career when she received a note from the most famous men in Hollywood saying he was interested in meeting her. It was then that she did the unbelievable; she refused to meet Cary Grant. They did finally meet and after a certain amount of pursuing by Grant, they got married. It was a stormy relationship at best, but writing her memoir, "Dear Cary", helped her heal and forgive many past hurts from the relationship.

Then, Neil Sedaka has been successful in the music business for nearly six decades. An accomplishment he attributes to hard work, a willingness to reinvent his career, and a flexibility to change his style. He is now producing children's books and music with his son, Marc. "Dinosaur Pet" is his wonderfully illustrated children's book that features whimsical translations of classic songs like "Calendar Girl" and "Breaking up is Hard to Do". Sedaka and his grandchildren sing these new translations together as "Dinosaur Pet" and "Waking Up is Hard to Do".

Dyan Cannon and Neil Sedaka, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Medicare and Medicaid Services

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, Jonathan Blum of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services looks at the Affordable Care Act as it rolls out and affects Medicare. Then, European Health Commissioner, John Dalli, talks about international medical events that may affect the US. This week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Jonathan Blum of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services looks at a host of issues, including new information on Hepatitis C, the Affordable Care Act as it rolls out and affects Medicare recipients, some prescription drug shortages that are affecting prices and other Medicare-related questions.

Then, European Health Commissioner, John Dalli, talks about international medical events that may affect the US. Threatened by the European economic crisis are various health plans that have maintained high standards of care for many years but are under threat. Another issue is the role of generic medicines in treating aging populations in Europe.

Jonathan Blum and John Dalli, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Pakistan on the Brink

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, journalist Ahmed Rashid’s gives his ideas for repairing fragile relations between America, Afghanistan, and Pakistan in his book, “Pakistan on the Brink”. Then, twenty years ago, Nancy Shulins, talks about letting go of one dream, having a child, and working toward another one, learning to ride in her book, "Falling for Eli".

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First, tension is tight between Pakistan and Afghanistan as it has been for ages. Pakistan has fought wars with India and battles with the former Soviet Union through Afghanistan. There are also many ethnic groups and religious influences that clash. The Taliban and al-Qaeda reside in the northern territories while the government resides in the south. When the U.S. killed Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad tensions strained between the U.S. and Pakistan.  Pakistani journalist, Ahmed Rashid now delves into the futures of American, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, telling how to strengthen the delicate balance of foreign relations in his book, “Pakistan on the Brink ”.

Then, everyone knows a woman who loves horses. Whether she rides during every spare moment of her time, or she rode as a young girl. Over twenty years ago, Nancy Shulins let go of her dream of having children and worked toward another goal. She learned to ride and, eventually, got her own horse, which she named Eli. She tells her story of what it means to love another being so much you can’t imagine life without them in her book, “Falling for Eli.”

Ahmed Rashid and Nancy Shulins, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Billie Jean King’s Life in Tennis

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, tennis great Billie Jean King discusses her sports career. Then, Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot discusses the art of gracefully exiting any life situation to leave behind great memories, often setting up for a great new beginning. Billie Jean King and Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, tennis great Billie Jean King discusses her career and her life with bad knees. She talks about the years of playing in pain due to arthritic knees, exacerbated by hours and hours on hard courts, competing. Now 68, she’s back on the court again after two knee replacements, not looking to win tournaments, just to have fun with the game she loves.

Then, Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot talks about the best ways to exit and gives examples of people who have made of an exit an artwork, leaving great memories behind. She even speaks of the wife who planned her husband’s exit by making his last weeks and months absolutely perfect for him and their friends. In her book, “Exit ” she explains how leaving any situation is just as important as how you enter and start and situation.

Billie Jean King and Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Tiger, Tiger

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, Margaux Fragoso tells her story of surviving and overcoming the scars of childhood sexual abuse by an older man. Then marketing guru Brad Fay reveals the secrets to harnessing the power of word of mouth marketing. This week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, when seven year old Margaux Fragoso met fifty-one year old Peter Curran at the neighborhood swimming pool, and they began to play. He invited her and her ill mother to his home, and she found a child’s paradise of exotic pets and an elaborate backyard garden. He insidiously takes on the role of her playmate, father, and lover. In time, Peter burrows into every aspect of her life and transforms her from an innocent child into a brainwashed young woman on the verge of suicide. She tells her story of innocnce lost in her book, Tiger, Tiger.

Then, in today’s digital world, 90 percent of recommendations that lead to consumer occur offline. In The Face to Face Book , marketing guru Brad Fay reveals the secrets to harnessing this power, showing readers how they can spread the word about their products and brands faster than the speed of Facebook and with far greater impact.

 

Margaux Fragoso and Brad Fay, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Avoiding Housing and Refinancing Scams

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Dr. Lori Trawinski discusses ways to spot and avoid housing and refinancing scams. Then, Larry Tye talks about his complete biography of the Man of Steel, Superman.

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First, Dr. Lori Trawinski is responsible for AARP’s research and analyses of policy issues relating to mortgage lending, housing finance reform, reverse mortgages, foreclosures, financial services, consumer debt and banking. She began her career as an economist at the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. She discusses how older Americans can spot and avoid housing and refinancing scams, especially, in these tough economic times.

Then, Seventy-five years after he came to life, Superman remains one of America’s most adored and enduring heroes. Now Larry Tye, the prize-winning journalist and New York Times bestselling author of Satchel, has written the first full-fledged history not just of the Man of Steel but of the creators, designers, owners, and performers who made him the icon he is today.

Lori Trawinski and Larry Tye, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Me the People: A more Perfect Constitution

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, Daily Show writer Kevin Bleyer looks at the history of the Constitution in his book, “Me the People”. Then, in his book, “Where They Stand”, author Bob Merry examines our presidential history, inviting readers to pitch their opinions of Presidents against the voters of old, the historians, and himself.

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First, the United States Constitution promised a “More Perfect Union”. It’s a shame no one bothered to write a more perfect Constitution, one that didn’t trigger more than two centuries of arguments about what the darn thing actually says. Kevin Bleyer looks at the history of the Constitution in his book, “Me the People”. Before rewriting the Constitution, Emmy Award winner Bleyer is a writer for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, for which he has won multiple Emmy Awards.

Then, in his book, “ Where They Stand”, author Bob Merry examines the Presidents he calls “Men of Destiny,’’ those who set the country toward new directions and the ones with not so spectacular terms. This voyage through our presidential history provides a probing and provocative analysis of how presidential politics works and how the country sets its course. Merry invites readers to pitch their opinions against the voters of old, the historians, the pollsters, and against the author himself.

Kevin Bleyer and Bob Merry, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Passion and the Paradox of Marilyn Monroe

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, Lois Banner analyzes the persona of Marilyn Monroe in a new biography. Then, Erica Jong discusses what real women really want when it comes to sex. Lois Banner and Erica Jong, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, like her art, Marilyn Monroe's life was rooted in paradox. She was a powerful star and childlike, a superb friend and a narcissist, a ditzy blonde and an intellectual. Lois Banner analyzes these aspects of her persona in a new biography, “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox.”

 

Then, Erica Jong discusses what women really want when it comes to sex. In her book, "Sugar in My Bowl" , with frank and honest discussion, she reveals that every woman has her own answer. From the hazards of casual sex, to joys of the long-term relationship, Jong proves that in love, the body plays as big a role as the heart.

 

Lois Banner and Erica Jong, this week on Prime Time Radio.

AARP’s Work Re-imagined Program

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, AARP’s President, Rob Romasco, explains how AARP’s innovative Work Re-imagined Program will help experienced workers. Then, Jeanne Cooper loves the job she’s held for more than three decades, bringing life to the character of Katherine Chancellor on "The Young and the Restless."

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First, AARP’s President, Rob Romasco and Editor in Chief of AARP’s Work Re-imagined Program, Peggy Northrop discuss the first talent exchange dedicated to helping companies find experienced workers. They explain how AARP is helping experienced professionals connect to more satisfying careers. Powered by LinkedIn, Work Re-imagined is the one network that has the full scope of people and information you need to succeed in today’s challenging and fluid workplace.

 

Then, Jeanne Cooper loves the job she’s held for more than three decades, bringing life to the character of Katherine Chancellor, the outspoken, powerful, and insanely wealthy force of nature on the legendary daytime television show, "The Young and the Restless." Now, for the first time, her fans will get to know the woman behind the iconic character in her memoir, “Not Young, Still Restless”.

 

Rob Romasco, Peggy Northrop, and Jeanne Cooper, this week on Prime Time Radio.

 

The Party is Over

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:52

First, author Mike Lofgren humorously and pointedly discusses everything that is wrong with Washington, politics in his book, “The Party Is Over”. Then, Janet Groth tells the story of her experience at “The New Yorker” in her memoir, “The Receptionist”. This week, on Prime Time Radio.

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First, based on the explosive article Mike Lofgren wrote when he resigned in disgust after the debt ceiling crisis, his book, “The Party Is Over” is a funny and impassioned exposé of everything that is wrong with Washington, politics.

 

Then, thanks to a successful interview with the painfully shy E.B. White, Janet Groth, a beautiful, 19-year-old blonde mid-westerner lands a job as a receptionist at “The New Yorker” magazine. She sees and learns from all the comings and goings, scandals, triumphs, and tragedies of the eccentric inhabitants of the 18th floor of the famous publication. Although she dreamed of becoming a writer, she never advanced at the magazine. Now she writes the story of her education at “The New Yorker” in her memoir, “The Receptionist”.

 

Mike Lofgren and Janet Groth, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Poet of the Violin, Joshua Bell

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Joshua Bell, one of the world's most celebrated violinists discusses his music career. Then, journalist Paul French finally gives the unclosed murder case of Pamela Werner resolution, in his book, “Midnight in Peking.” This week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Joshua Bell is lauded as a poet of the violin and is one of the world's most celebrated violinists. He enchants audiences with his breathtaking virtuosity and charismatic stage presence. His endless curiosity, passion, and multi-faceted musical interests have earned him the rare title of classical music superstar. Bell recently appeared on the Grammy-nominated crossover recording Short Trip Home with composer and double bass virtuoso Edgar Meyer at the 75th anniversary of Tanglewood.

 

Then, journalist Paul French finally gives the unclosed murder case of Pamela Werner resolution, in his book, “Midnight in Peking.” In the tradition of the true crime classics, French transforms a seventy-five year old front-page murder into an absorbing and emotional exposé, bringing the last days of old Peking to life.

 

Joshua Bell and Paul French, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Transform Your Worst Qualities in to Your Best Assets

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:56

First, Judy Smith, expert crisis management consultant and author discusses, “Scandal”, the new ABC TV series based on her career, and explains how to survive personal crisis or failure. Then, Dr. Stewart Fleishman condenses three decades of research into a model of supportive cancer treatment.

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First, Judy Smith, expert crisis management consultant and author, discusses “Scandal”, the new ABC TV series based on her career and her new book, “Good Self, Bad Self.” Smith explains that the way to get through a personal or professional rough spot is by realizing which personality traits lead to our successes and most painful failures. In “Good Self, Bad Self”, Smith distills years of experience into essential tools we all will need at some time or another to face our mistakes and ultimately overcome them, transforming them into valuable learning experiences.

 

Then, Dr. Stewart Fleishman condenses three decades of research, patient outreach and development into a model of supportive integrative cancer treatment in his book, “How to Live through Cancer.” Presenting a proactive step-by-step guide to improving the length and quality of life for cancer survivors, while helping them to manage the variety of physical and emotional issues they may face before and after treatment. Dr. Fleishman’s guidance is an inspirational and essential roadmap to a healthier and meaningful future following a cancer diagnosis.

 

Judy Smith and Dr. Stewart Fleishman, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Life and Death at Belleview Hospital

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Dr. Eric Manheimer's memoir, “Twelve Patients”, tells the stories of twelve very different patients at the famous Belleview Hospital, including his own experience as medical director and a patient. Then, author Tanner Colby, sets out to discover why in an age of racial equality, actual integration is still rare in his book, “Some of My Best Friends are Black.” This week, on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Dr. Eric Manheimer's memoir, “Twelve Patients”, tells the stories of twelve very different patients at the famous Belleview Hospital. Dr. Manheimer uses the experiences of well-known foreign dignitaries, and business tycoons, to supermax prisoners from Riker's Island, and illegal immigrants at the hospital to illustrate larger societal issues. However, he is not only the medical director of the country's oldest public hospital, but he is also a patient. As his own story unfolds, he is diagnosed with cancer, and is faced with his own mortality as he works to preserves others.

 

Then, nearly half a century after Martin Luther King, Jr.’s "I Have a Dream" speech, equal rights abound, but actual racial integration is still rare. Drawn out battles over unfair housing practices and affirmative action have contributed to the bleak fact is that black people and white people in the United States don’t spend much time together, ever. Author, Tanner Colby, raised in a white Southern suburb, set out to discover why in his book, “Some of My Best Friends are Black.”

 

Dr. Eric Manheimer and Tanner Colby, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Killing Kennedy and the End of Camelot

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, Bill O’Reilly examines all aspects of the most notorious crime of the twentieth century in his book, “Killing Kennedy.” Then, journalist David Cay Johnston, exposes many the ways huge corporations hide sneaky stipulations in just about every consumer contract in his book, “The Fine Print”.

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First, Bill O’Reilly examines all aspects of the most notorious crime of the twentieth century in his book, “Killing Kennedy.” The timeline of events leading up to the shots fired in Dallas that killed of President John F Kennedy are almost as shocking as the assassination itself. Bill O’Reilly chronicles both the heroism and deceit of Camelot, bringing history to life in profoundly moving ways.

 

Then, journalist David Cay Johnston, famous for exposing the perfidies of our biggest institutions, turns his attention to the ways huge corporations hide sneaky stipulations in just about every contract. His book, “The Fine Print”, exposes many of the stipulations designed to make consumers pay the most for many services, while also keeping as much profit as possible in the corporation’s pockets. Johnston also lays out what you need to know to avoid obscure fees and hidden taxes that line the pockets of the corporations. 

 

Bill O’Reilly and David Cay Johnston, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Luck, or Something like It

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:00:47

First, music icon Kenny Rogers details his lifelong journey from the boy who loved to sing to living legend in his memoir, "Luck or Something Like It." Then, Henry Winkler may be best remembered for his award winning role as The Fonz, but he can be seen speaking across the country to raise awareness for the "Open Arms" campaign which is striving to help sufferers of Upper Limb Spasticity. This week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Kenny Rogers has been recording some of the most revered and beloved music in America and around the world for more than fifty years. He has become a living musical legend by combining every genre of music and his unique voice to create a sound that is both wholly original and instantly recognizable. He details his lifelong journey to becoming one of American music's icons creating hit records for decades while staying true to his values as a performer and a person in his memoir, “Luck or Something like It.”

 

Then, Henry Winkler, the actor, writer, producer and director, may always be best remembered for his Golden Globe-winning role as “The Fonz” on Happy Days. However, now he is frequently seen speaking all over the country about a project he holds very dear to his heart. For the last 18 months, Henry has been working with an incredible team of advocacy partners, including the Paralyzed Veterans of America, as an ambassador for the “Open Arms: Raising Awareness of Upper Limb Spasticity” educational campaign. An educational campaign designed to raise awareness and understanding of the condition and provide people with upper limb spasticity and their caregivers the resources and information.

 

Kenny Rogers and Henry Winkler, this week on Prime Time Radio.

God, If You’re Not Up There…

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:56

First, Darrell Hammond discusses his life and fame in on screen and behind the camera. Then, Joan Walsh argues that America’s fundamental divide is not about political parties, ideology, or even race, but that opportunities have stagnated for the middle class. This week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Darrell Hammond delves into the darkest corners of his life, both in front of and behind the camera, with brutal honesty and fierce comic wit. His memoir, “God, If you're not up there, I'm F***ed”, ranges from his harrowing childhood filled with abuse, to a lifetime of alcoholism and self-mutilation, psychiatric hospitalizations and misdiagnoses, to the peak of fame and success as the longest-tenured cast member of Saturday Night Live.

 

Then, Joan Walsh argues that America’s fundamental divide is not about parties, ideology or even race, but about how each side of the divide believes we got here. In her book, “What’s the Matter with White People”, Walsh looks back over the last several decades of American politics and culture, showing how the white working class, the class into which she was born and raised, has seen opportunities stagnate or decline and the stability of the middle class disintegrate.

 

Darrell Hammond and Joan Walsh, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Basic Economics in the Upcoming Election

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

As the election approaches and the presidential race heats up, the economy has once again emerged as a crucial issue. Author Paddy Hirsch, explains all the basics in his book, "Man VS Markets." Then, Anthony Summers and Robbyn Swan Summers deliver a complex work that delves into the background of 9/11, the darkest day in history for most living Americans in their book, "The Eleventh Day". This week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, as the election approaches and the presidential race heats up, the economy has once again emerged as a crucial issue. Terms such as fiscal policy, interest rate, and leveraged buyoutare regularly tossed around in coverage of the state of our economy and election debates. Author Paddy Hirsch, the Senior Producer of Personal Finance at “Marketplace ” explains all the basic principles of economics and applies them to the upcoming election in his book, “Man VS Markets.”

 

Then, with access to thousands of recently released official documents, fresh interviews, and the perspective that can come only from a decade of research and reflection, Anthony Summers and Robbyn Swan deliver the first panoramic, authoritative look back at 9/11 in their book, “The Eleventh Day.”  The book is complex and thorough work that delves into the background and events leading up to what is the darkest day in history for most living Americans.

 

Paddy Hirsch, Anthony Swan and Robbyn Swan Summers, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Myths, Controversy, and History of Mammograms

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, in his book, The Big Squeeze, Dr. Handel Reynolds, a practicing radiologist, helps to evaluate the ongoing public health controversies surrounding mammography and explain the history of the procedure since its introduction in the early 1970s. Then, Andrea Stillman gives an in depth study that explores Ansel Adams life as an artist. Her book, Looking at Ansel Adams, is a close look at the life and work of the countrys most revered landscape photographer and environmental advocate. Dr. Handel Reynolds, Dr. Kimberly Blackwell, and Andrea Stillman, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, in his book, “The Big Squeeze”, Dr. Handel Reynolds, a practicing radiologist, notes that in 2009, when a panel of medical experts recommended that women should get regular mammograms starting at the age of fifty, it was only the most recent controversy in the turbulent history of mammography. With millions of women who face the decision about whether to get a mammogram, Dr. Reynolds sets out helps to evaluate the ongoing public health controversies surrounding mammography and explain the history of the procedure since it’s introduction in the early 1970’s.

 

Then, author, Andrea Stillman gives a personal and penetrating study that explores Ansel Adam’s life as an artist. The stories behind important and less commonly seen photographs provide unexpected insight into Ansel's creative and personal life. Her book, “Looking at Ansel Adams” is a close look at the life and work of the country's most revered landscape photographer and environmental advocate.

 

Dr. Handel Reynolds, Dr. Kimberly Blackwell, and Andrea Stillman, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Take a Stand to Take Control of Diabetes

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Tony Award-winning actor, Ben Vereen, joins forces with “Taking Control of Your Diabetes,” to educate people on the importance of getting tested and staying healthy. Then, Alf Clausen’s musical arrangements for films and television shows have won him many awards...including his compositions for the hit television series: "The Simpsons". Ben Vereen and Alf Clausen, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Tony Award-winning actor, Ben Vereen, joins forces with “Taking Control of Your Diabetes,” the leading education organization, to call on Americans to S.T.A.N.D. and “Start Taking Action Now for Diabetes”. By using the power of social marketing and many speaking programs across the country, Mr. Vereen is starting a movement among patients and their friends to take a stand and work to take control of their blood sugar levels.

  Then, Alf Clausen began his illustrious career as a French horn player, and soon went on to be an instructor at his Alma Mater, Berklee College of Music. His musical arrangements for films and television shows have won him a myriad of awards, including at least eight Emmys. He has composed for quite a few television series but his longest stint with a series has been “The Simpsons”.

  Ben Vereen and Alf Clausen, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Pets: Man’s Best and Sometime’s Worst Friend

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Richard Cohen’s “I Want to Kill the Dog” is a look at love and the healing power of humor when getting rid of an unruly furry creature is not an option. Richard’s wife and her minions, the dogs, rule the household in which he was once king. And he is not happy about giving up the throne. Then, New York Times bestselling author Jon Katz, warms hearts with his stories of the special relationships between people and animals in his book, “Dancing Dogs”. He tells about his favorite canine friends, and the pets that inspired him to write some of his favorite stories. Richard Cohen and Jon Katz, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Richard Cohen’s “I Want to Kill the Dog” is more than a nod to everyone weary of the pet maintains a higher status in the house that once used to be an oasis of calm. It is also a look at marriage and the healing power of humor and family when getting rid of the furry creature is not an option. Even as guests are terrified and delivery men are driven away by howling shrieks, Richard’s wife and her minions, the dogs, continue to rule the household in which he was once king.

 

Then, New York Times bestselling author Jon Katz, warms hearts with his stories of the special relationships between people and animals in his book, “Dancing Dogs”. He tells about his favorite canine friends, how some pets inspired him to write stories, and talks over his favorite short stories from the book. Katz gives meaningful insight into how animals bring a wonderful bit of light and sometimes healing into our lives. 

 

Richard Cohen and Jon Katz, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Boomers Hard at Work

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Carol Bogosian, explains a recent report from the Society of Actuaries, showing that at least one-third of people nearing retirement believe they are financially unprepared. The report shows how the current economy, combined with people living much longer, is complicates retirement preparations. Then, we make most decisions with extreme scrutiny. One area that we do not research at all is selecting our healthcare provider. Dr. Archelle Georgiou explains many factors that can help when selecting doctors and hospitals. Carol Bogosian and Archelle Georgiou, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, the current domestic economy, combined with people living much longer, is causing a general need for people to work much later than the traditional retirement age. Some are simply choosing to retire later in life, while others feel they cannot retire at all, according to a recent report from the Society of Actuaries. Carol Bogosian explains how the statistics reveal that as much as one-third of people nearing retirement age believe they are financially unable to retire.

 

Then, in an election year, Americans are vetting the issues carefully and watching the political debates closely so they can make informed decisions. We also research the cars we will buy in depth, with much scrutiny. However, we’re not as calculated with our research when it comes to selecting our healthcare provider. Dr. Archelle Georgiou explains new studies that show shocking facts and how this data can help people make better decisions when selecting doctors and hospitals, especially for emergency situations.

 

Carol Bogosian and Archelle Georgiou, this week on Prime Time Radio.

NPH: The Disease often Misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, neurosurgeon Michael Turner explains the effects of the disease Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH). Symptoms of NPH, are similar to those of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson's, causing it to often go misdiagnosed and mistreated. Hear some real life examples of patients who thought they were bound by a terminal disease and the sigh of relief they felt when they learned their disease is actually curable. Then, in the face of economic crisis and depleting energy resources, Sharon Astyk tells how to live a better life with less in her book, “Making Home”. She shares lessons on how to save money on everything from air conditioning and heating to cooking and laundry. Dr. Michael Turner and Sharon Astyk, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, neurosurgeon Michael Turner explains the effects of the disease Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH). Symptoms of the disease include progressive mental impairment or dementia, problems with walking, and a decrease in bladder control. Because these symptoms are similar to those of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and others, the disease is often misdiagnosed and subsequently mistreated. Two of Dr. Turner’s patients and their spouses/caregivers join him to give their personal accounts of fighting NPH.

Then, in the face of economic crisis and depleting energy resources, Sharon Astyk tells how to live better with less in her book, “Making Home.” Astyk gives an intriguing account of how she and her family are now living a more fulfilling life using less. After making some challenging and fundamental life changes, her home now uses eighty percent less energy than the average home. She also shares lessons on how to save money on heating, cooling, laundry, sanitation, food, and everything else.

Dr. Michael Turner and Sharon Astyk, this week on Prime Time Radio.

How Shakespeare Changed Everything

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, author Stephen Marche explains how Shakespeare’s work has profoundly shaped our modern life including our views on marriage and the adolescent years. In his book, How Shakespeare Changed Everything Marche tells how the bard changed it all. Then, acclaimed novelist Paul Auster provides a candid peek of his 63rd winter and the toll the passage of time has taken on his body and mind in his new memoir, Winter Journal. He explores many facets of his relationship with his mother and his own journey through life. Stephen Marche and Paul Auster, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Stephen_marche_shakespeare_book_cover001_small First, author Stephen Marche explains how Shakespeare’s work has profoundly shaped our modern life including our views on marriage and the teen years. Marche believes that Shakespeare’s influence permeates our daily lives more than most realize, from the invention of now common words and phrases to opportunities for seminal moments in history. Esquire columnist, Stephen Marche, in his book, How Shakespeare Changed Everything provides compelling examples of how the bard changed modern life, including coining nearly two thousand words, names, and countless common phrases..  

Then, acclaimed novelist Paul Auster provides a candid peek of his 63rd winter and the toll the passage of time has taken on his body and mind in his new memoir, “Winter Journal”. He also explores many facets of his relationships with his mother: her impact on his life, memories of her strengths and weaknesses, and how they spent time together over the past sixty-three years before her death.  Auster gives a highly personal interview on his journey through life.

Stephen Marche and Paul Auster, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Books to Die For

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, best-selling crime thriller author, John Connolly discusses his most ambitious work to date, Books to Die For. He discusses the personal essays of some of the world’s most popular crime WRITERS on their favorite mysteries.
Then, journalist Kati Marton recounts how the City of Lights was the backdrop of a love lost and a love rekindled. In her moving memoir, Paris: A Love Story she reflects on her marriages to two high profile men: news anchor Peter Jennings and UN Ambassador Richard Holbrooke. John Connolly and Kati Marton, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, best-selling crime novelist, John Connolly discusses the favorite mystery thrillers of the top crime writers. Connolly, along with Declan Burke edited Books to Die For , an ambitious anthology featuring the personal essays of more than a hundred authors giving tribute to their favorite mystery novels. Learn the must-read crime fiction books from the top mystery genre writers.

 

Then, journalist Kati Marton tells the story of why she loves Paris and how she fell in love WITH the City of Lights . In her memoir, Paris: A Love Story s he candidly discusses her failed marriage to news anchor Peter Jennings and creates an intimate portrait of love lost when her second husband, Ambassador Richard Holbrooke died. Kati returned to Paris to courageously move on with life and rebuild her spirit.

 

John Connolly and Kati Marton, this week on Prime Time Radio .

The Bells of the National Cathedral

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:01:59

Experience the resilient spirit and hope of the holiday season in this hour-long special featuring the beautiful bells of the historic Washington National Cathedral’s carillon. This week on Prime Time Radio.

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Celebrate the resilient spirit and hope of the holiday season with this encore hour-long Prime Time Radio special featuring the beautiful bells of the historic Washington National Cathedral’s carillon. Host Mike Cuthbert ascends the bell tower and sits in the “wheelhouse” with distinguished carillonneur Edward Nassor, who melodiously plays the bells exclusively for Prime Time Radio and shares the fascinating history and workings of the bells.

Enjoy the beautiful bells of the Washington National Cathedral this week on Prime Time Radio

Dolly Parton Celebrates the Dreamers in Life

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Dolly Parton believes dreaming big, learning more, and always caring can lead us all to be better people and take charge of their future. She celebrates the dreams that got her through some tough and lonely times in her memoir, Dream More. Parton shares many personal experiences that forged her beliefs. Then, more singles are going online to find romance. Nancy Davidoff Kelton and Ken Solin, two new dating experts for AARP, have plenty of advice for people looking for new relationships online. Dolly Parton, Nancy Kelton, and Ken Solin, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Dolly Parton believes dreaming big, learning more, and always caring can lead us all to be better people. She celebrates the dreams that got her through some tough and lonely times in her memoir, “Dream More.” The book, which expands on a commencement speech she once gave at the University of Tennessee, gives many examples from throughout Parton’s own life and career that forged her beliefs and shows that anyone can take charge of their future.

Then, more and more singles are going online to find romance, especially in the 50+ age group.   Nancy Davidoff Kelton and Ken Solin, two new dating experts for AARP, have plenty of advice for people looking for new relationships and find someone that is compatible. They suggest that once you find someone interesting online, get offline fast and start the dating process. Kelton and Solin also offer tips on writing the better profiles, great places for first dates, and dating mistakes to avoid.

Dolly Parton, Nancy Kelton, and Ken Solin, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Master Class

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

Many happy, active and sharp older folks are thriving in their communities and families with many interests that keep their lives rich and meaningful. Peter Spiers shares the secret to this kind of fulfilling life: staying mobile, social, creative, and learning. Then, for decades, Afghanistan has been a country torn by war, corruption, and poverty that have stripped Afghan culture of its dignity. But Atta Arghandiwal paints a different picture, one of the regal beauty of the Afghan culture he once knew as a child. Peter Spiers and Atta Arghandiwal, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Many happy, active and sharp older folks are thriving as social butterflies in their communities and families. They are strong and healthy, with many hobbies or interests that keep their lives rich and meaningful. The secret to this kind of fulfilling life is staying mobile, social, creative, and thinking. Peter Spiers, author of “Master Class” reveals how to build an enriching lifestyle based on your favorite activities. 

Then, Afghanistan is known as a country torn by wars, tribal violence, poverty, and an uncertain future. It seems as if four decades of foreign military invasions, political corruption, and domestic selfishness have stripped Afghan culture of its dignity. But Atta Arghandiwal, now a successful banker in California, paints a different picture of his homeland in his memoir, Lost Decency . He chronicles the regal beauty of the Afghan culture he knew as a child with passionate pride.

Peter Spiers and Atta Arghandiwal, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Encyclopedia Paranoiaca

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, there are many seemingly healthy, harmless, and common objects, which are actually perilously hazardous to our health. Master satirist Christopher Cerf talks about the great pains he and Henry Beard took to compile the list into one comprehensive volume called Encyclopedia Paranoiaca. Then, the culinary industry brings to mind images of intense chefs toiling in steamy kitchens. Charlotte Druckman, author of Skirt Steak, explores what it’s like for women chefs in an arena where most of the fame goes to men. Christopher Cerf and Charlotte Druckman, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, there are many seemingly healthy, harmless. and common objects, which are actually perilously hazardous to our health. The list of objects and activities that potentially pose life-threatening dangers is long and ranges from flip-flops and hand washing to leafy greens and drinking straws. Master satirists Christopher Cerf and Henry Beard have taken great pains to compile the list into one comprehensive volume, “Encyclopedia Paranoiaca.” Christopher Cerf joins Prime time Radio to discuss the many perils of everyday life.    

Then, the culinary industry can bring to mind images of intense male chefs toiling long hours in steamy kitchens in glamorous restaurants.  What about women in the kitchen? Charlotte Druckman offers a behind-the-scenes look at the industry in her book, “Skirt Steak,” revealing what it’s like for female chefs in the cutthroat and male dominated restaurant business.    

Christopher Cerf and Charlotte Druckman, this week on Prime Time Radio .

Who Stole the American Dream

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Hedrick Smith, a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist on national affairs examines recent national events to find and the result is, “Who Stole the American Dream?” The book looks at the past four decades tracing the the political decisions that have drastically changed our country. Then, Maz Rauber and Amy Reingold have each raised two children in the Washington DC metro area. So when the former reporter and former textile artist decided to reinvent themselves as novelists, they had plenty of experience to inspire their teen fiction series, “Capital Girls.” Hedrick Smith, Maz Rauber, and Amy Reingold, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Hedrick Smith, a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist on national affairs examines recent national events to find and the result is, “Who Stole the American Dream?” The book looks at the past four decades tracing the events that have increasingly divided the rich and poor and caused. Smith discusses the political decisions that have drastically changed our country and undermined the American Dream.

Then, Maz Rauber and Amy Reingold have each raised two children in the Washington DC metro area. So when the former reporter and former textile artist decided to reinvent themselves as novelists, they had plenty of experience to inspire their teen fiction series, “Capital Girls.”   

Hedrick Smith, Maz Rauber, and Amy Reingold , this week on Prime Time Radio.

Courage to be Vulnerable

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Dr. Brené Brown argues that vulnerability is the basis of both courage and fulfillment in life. In her book, Daring Greatly, Brown challenges everyone to risk being vulnerable and change the way we live, love, and relate to others. Then, people spend endless hours and much effort trying to change their behavior patterns. Psychologist Jeremy Dean explains that most human behavior happens unconsciously and merely changing a small activity can have a profound effect on a stubborn habit. Brené Brown and Jeremy Dean, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Dr First, Theodore Roosevelt, in a speech given in Paris, once spoke of the possibility of failing while daring greatly. When we face any new situation in life, we are vulnerable to uncertainty, failure, and pain. Dr. Brené Brown refutes the idea that vulnerability is weakness, explaining that it is the basis of both courage and fulfillment in life. In her book, Daring Greatly, Brown challenges us to risk being vulnerable and change the way we live, love, lead, and parent.

Then, it seems that even making simple habits stick can sometimes be a Herculean task even after 21 days of trying and trying again. People spend endless hours and much effort trying to change their behavior patterns. Psychologist Jeremy Dean, founder of Psyblog, and author of Making Habits, Breaking Habits, argues that most human behavior happens unconsciously and merely changing a small activity can have a profound effect on a stubborn habit. Dean unveils other ways it is possible to forge new habits, improve health, productivity, and creativity.

Brené Brown and Jeremy Dean, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Courage to be Vulnerable

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Dr. Brené Brown argues that vulnerability is the basis of both courage and fulfillment in life. In her book, Daring Greatly, Brown challenges everyone to risk being vulnerable and change the way we live, love, and relate to others. Then, people spend endless hours and much effort trying to change their behavior patterns. Psychologist Jeremy Dean explains that most human behavior happens unconsciously and merely changing a small activity can have a profound effect on a stubborn habit. Brené Brown and Jeremy Dean, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Dr First, Theodore Roosevelt, in a speech given in Paris, once spoke of the possibility of failing while daring greatly. When we face any new situation in life, we are vulnerable to uncertainty, failure, and pain. Dr. Brené Brown refutes the idea that vulnerability is weakness, explaining that it is the basis of both courage and fulfillment in life. In her book, Daring Greatly, Brown challenges us to risk being vulnerable and change the way we live, love, lead, and parent.

Then, it seems that even making simple habits stick can sometimes be a Herculean task even after 21 days of trying and trying again. People spend endless hours and much effort trying to change their behavior patterns. Psychologist Jeremy Dean, founder of Psyblog, and author of Making Habits, Breaking Habits, argues that most human behavior happens unconsciously and merely changing a small activity can have a profound effect on a stubborn habit. Dean unveils other ways it is possible to forge new habits, improve health, productivity, and creativity.

Brené Brown and Jeremy Dean, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Normal Bar: What is a Normal Relationship?

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, AARP’s Love and Relationship expert, Pepper Schwartz, gives the details of a survey, titled “The Normal Bar,” that uncovered the surprising secrets of happy couples. The study, based on results from nearly 100,000 respondents provides insights about creating a new normal in your relationship. Then, in “The Happiness Choice,” Marilyn Tam teaches the five basic principles and values that can lead to a happier, healthier, and more fulfilled life. Tam takes many life lessons and uses them to illustrate how anyone can achieve the life they have always dreamed of living. Pepper Schwartz and Marilyn Tam, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Normalbar_bookcover_small First, AARP’s Love and Relationship expert, Pepper Schwartz, gives the details of an extensive survey that studied thousands of happy couples and what they reveal about creating a new normal in relationships. The study, titled “The Normal Bar,” reveals insightful and surprising information on ways couples can achieve satisfaction and contentment in areas such as communication, sex, and affection. Schwartz also discusses the factors that can ignite relational conflict, and what people really admire in their partner.

Then, in “The Happiness Choice,” Marilyn Tam teaches the five basic principles and values that can lead to a happier, healthier, and more fulfilled life. Tam takes many of the lessons she learned while growing up a poor, neglected, and unloved child in Hong Kong and uses them to illustrate how anyone can achieve success and the life they have always dreamed of living.

Pepper Schwartz and Marilyn Tam, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Legacy of Medgar Evers

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Medgar Evers was heavily involved in civil rights activism and was instrumental in efforts to end segregation in Mississippi. His widow, Myrlie Evers-Williams talks of his impact on the civil rights movement nearly 50 years after his assassination and discusses her continuing work. Then, the new National Museum of African American History and Culture is scheduled to open in 2015. Director Lonnie Bunch shares what has been collected and how the museum is coming along. Myrlie Evers-Williams, and Lonnie Bunch III, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Mike_05001_small First, slain activist Medgar Evers was heavily involved in civil rights after returning from World War II and graduating from Alcorn College in 1951. He was also instrumental in the efforts to end segregation at the University of Mississippi. His widow, Myrlie Evers-Williams talks of his legacy and impact on the civil rights movement nearly 50 years after his assassination. She also discusses her continuing work for civil rights and reflects on her opportunity to give the invocation at the second inaugural ceremony of President Barack Obama.

Then, in 2013, our nation celebrates many historic anniversaries in the struggle for civil rights and racial harmony including the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 and the 1963 March on Washington and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous I have a Dream Speech. Lonnie Bunch III, director of the new National Museum of African American History and Culture talks about the museum’s efforts to collect artifacts and chronicle the stories of many well-known and forgotten heroes who sacrificed to keep the dream of equality alive.

Myrlie Evers-Williams, and Lonnie Bunch, this week on Prime Time Radio.

MLK: Historic Moments of the Civil Rights Movement

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, Taylor Branch has identified eighteen pivotal events in the civil rights movement of the 1960’s in his book, “The King Years.” Branch provides detailed historical context for each event and explores the continuing legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.’s work. Then, on a dark night in 1839, a group of Africans broke free of their chains on the slave-ship, Amistad, and took control of the vessel. With no viable destination port, the Navy quickly captured and had them imprisoned. Marcus Rediker tells the story of how the slaves reclaimed their freedom. Taylor Branch and Marcus Rediker, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Pulitzer Prize winning author Taylor Branch in his latest book, The King Years identifies eighteen pivotal events in the civil rights movement of the 1960’s.  Branch provides detailed historical context for each event and explores Martin Luther King Jr.’s continuing legacy in depth. From King’s influence on other contemporary civil rights leaders, the March on Washington, to his tumultuous relationship with President Lyndon Johnson, Branch shows there are many lessons to be learned from the life of Dr. King.   

Then, on a dark night in the early summer of 1839, a group of courageous Africans took control of their fates in what is one of the best-known slave ship rebellions. Led by Cinqué, a group of slaves broke free of their chains and wrested command of the schooner Amistad from the captain and crew. With no viable destination, the US Navy soon captured and imprisoned the Africans in a federal prison. Marcus Rediker tells the full story of how these courageous men changed the fight against slavery and eventually reclaimed their freedom.

Taylor Branch and Marcus Rediker, this week on Prime Time Radio .

The Fundamentals of Life and leadership: Colin Powell’s Story

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

General Colin Powell gives anecdotes from his distinguished military career from his book, "In Life and Leadership." One of Americas most respected public officials; Powell is a role model for anyone who wants to achieve their dreams. Then, journalist Margaret Webb Presslers husband Jim looks much younger than his age. She uses her husbands habits as a starting point to explain how to counteract the aging process. Pressler gives ideas for many small lifestyle changes that will slow the aging process to a crawl. General Colin Powell and Margaret Webb Pressler, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, General Colin Powell gives life lessons and tells stories from his distinguished military career from his best-selling book, “In Life and Leadership.” One of America’s most respected public officials; he has averted wars over tiny uninhabited islands and served in civilian and military’s highest positions. Powell is also a role model for anyone who wants to achieve their goals and exceed their dreams.

Then, journalist Margaret Webb Pressler’s husband Jim looks much younger than his age. She uses her husband’s lifestyle and habits as starting point to explain how anyone can counteract the aging process. Pressler does not talk about the usual diet and exercise programs, and instead gives simple and small lifestyle changes that will slow the aging process to a crawl.   

General Colin Powell and Margaret Webb Pressler, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Power of Women Leading Change

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Many extraordinary women around the world are using their diverse talents to improve human rights. Alyse Nelson is the CEO of Vital Voices, an organization that fights against degradation and violence against women and girls, and helps empower women to change their communities. Then, many great American women get little or no recognition in our nations history. Joan Wages is working to raise awareness of some previously unsung heroes. She explains the importance of the role of women in transforming society for the better. Alyse Nelson and Joan Wages, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Nelson_vital_voices_3d001_small First, many extraordinary women around the world are using their diverse talents to transform lives and improve human rights. Alyse Nelson is the CEO and cofounder of Vital Voices, an organization that fights against degradation and violence against women and girls, and helps empower women to become catalysts for change in their communities. Nelson highlights some modern unsung heroes fighting for the rights of women, and thereby improving communities, around the world.

Then, many great American women get little or no recognition in our nation’s story. Joan Wages is tirelessly working to raise awareness of women’s history and some previously unsung heroes. Wages explains the importance of the role of women in transforming society, and encourages all people, women and men, to participate in democratic dialogue about our future.

Alyse Nelson and Joan Wages , this week on Prime Time Radio.

Lose Weight and Live Longer with the New American Diet

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, building on a collaborative research project conducted by the NIH and AARP, Dr. John Whyte gives several weight loss plans and advises diet busters to avoid in his new book, "The New American Diet." Then, "On Looking," a new book from Alexandra Horowitz, is a charming exploration of how much there is to see and how to really see it. By going on walks with a variety of subjects, she gives great insight into the mysteries of human perception. Dr. John Whyte and Alexandra Horowitz, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, many small, simple changes can be made to diet and exercise that will greatly improve quality of life, health, and happiness. Building on a collaborative research project conducted by the NIH and AARP, Dr. John Whyte gives several weight loss plans and outlines diet busters to avoid in his new book, “The New American Diet.” Packed with practical advice geared specifically for the older American, Whyte’s plan can help anyone lose up to ten pounds in two weeks.

Then, we all perceive the everyday spectacle of the ordinary differently, starting with how we intake information initially, by seeing. To find out what people see and how they see it, cognitive scientist and psychology professor, Alexandra Horowitz, goes on walks with a variety of subjects from children, to artists and scientists. Her book, “On Looking,” is a charmingly told exploration of how much there is to see and how to really see it, giving great insight into the mysteries of human perception.

Dr. John Whyte and Alexandra Horowitz, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Value of Showing Appreciation in the Workplace

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Dr. Gary Chapman, author of the book explaining the five ways people communicate love, translates these same communication principles to the workplace in his book, “The Five Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace.” Then, idea of retirement has transformed from extended vacations, to a time when people can pursue career dreams that they pushed to the side for years. Nancy Collamer, author of “Second Act Careers,” has lots of advice for turning those passions into profitable business ventures. Gary Chapman and Nancy Collamer, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, there are many ways to show people in our lives appreciation, but what is the most appropriate way to show an employee or coworker appreciation? Dr. Gary Chapman, author of the book explaining the five ways people communicate love, translates these same communication principles to the workplace in his book, “The Five Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace.”  

Then, idea of retirement has transformed from extended vacations, to a time when people can pursue career dreams that they pushed to the side for years. Nancy Collamer, author of “Second Act Careers,” has lots of advice for turning those passions into profitable business ventures.

Gary Chapman and Nancy Collamer, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Creating Your Best Marriage and Affair Proofing It

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, although most people plan careers or finances, something society doesn't teach people how to plan is a strong marriage. Gary Neuman has created a new method that will help couples plan for marriage, thrive, and protect against infidelity. Then, to help avoid investment mistakes, financial adviser Jane Bryant Quinn will reveal many ways to make the most of your money. Quinn focuses on financially planning for retirement, and investing while in retirement. Gary Neuman and Jane Bryant Quinn, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, most people plan for careers, finances, and children, but an area that society doesn’t teach people how to plan for is their marriage. Often couples can become complacent in their relationship, just waiting for the next milestone to come along. Gary Neuman has created a new method that will help couples focus on their marriage plan whether they are newly married or adjusting to an empty nest. The “Neuman Method” will help couples thrive with each other, heal and reconcile histories of infidelity, and protect against future infidelity.     

Then, to help avoid many investment mistakes and shed light on spending mistakes, financial adviser Jane Bryant Quinn will reveal many ways to make the most of your money. Quinn focuses on financially planning for retirement, and maximizing your money even if you are already retired.   

Gary Neuman and Jane Bryant Quinn, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Saturday Night Widows

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

The Saturday Night Widows are a group of six friends that decided to remake their lives after suffering the loss of their husbands. Aikmans memoir of the same title recounts how she formed the group and how they began live their lives to the fullest. Then, two well-known legends that embody the indomitable spirit of the old west and rode head long into a new century are Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Author Thom Hatch, tells the intriguing and little known real story of these notorious bandits in his book, "The Last Outlaws." Becky Aikman and Thom Hatch, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, the Saturday Night Widows are a group of six friends that refused to accept the roles society handed them and remake their lives after suffering loss and struggle to refind their places in the world. After being asked to leave a support group, Aikman formed her own group and began to really live her life to the fullest.

Then, two well-known legends that embody the indomitable spirit of the old west and rode head long into a new century are Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Although, until recently, the little has been known about them is often confused for what was seen in the famous starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford. However, author and historian, Thom Hatch, dispels the myth that these two folk heroes were gunned down in a blaze of glory in Bolivia and tells a much more intriguing story in his book, “The Last Outlaws.”

Becky Aikman and Thom Hatch, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Gather at the Table

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:55

First, two authors set out on a life-changing journey together to examine the ugly realities of racism, the enduring cultural scars left by the American slave trade, and how society can begin to heal these scars while insuring justice for all in their book, "Gather at the Table." Then, many innovators have been creating renewable energy solutions for a greener future for longer than most people realize. Alexis Madrigal, author of "Powering the Dream," gives the history of green technology and a look at the future of renewable energy. Thomas DeWolf, Sharon Morgan and Alexis Madrigal, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, knowing that America must completely overcome it’s racial barriers, two authors set out on a life changing journey to break down their own cultural biases. Thomas Dewolf is the descendant of one of the most lucrative slave trading families and Sharon Morgan is the descendant of slaves. Together they travelled thousands of miles and faced many ugly realities to bring to light the many enduring cultural scars left by the American slave trade. Both authors speak about their experiences and explain how their book, “Gather at the Table,” can be used to start discussions about building true equality and justice for all.      

Then, numerous innovators and inventors have been attempting to put America on the path to sustainable energy for longer than most people realize. More than a few bright minds foresaw or current energy shortages and tried to invent inexpensive renewable energy solutions for a greener future. For instance, nearly a century ago, there were electric powered cabs in New York City. Alexis Madrigal, author of “Powering the Dream,” gives the history of green technology and a somewhat hopeful look at the future of renewable energy.

Thomas DeWolf, Sharon Morgan and Alexis Madrigal , this week on Prime Time Radio.

A Journey with Hillary Clinton

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, journalist, Kim Ghattas had inside access to Hillary Clinton on her world travels while covering the US State Department. Lebanese born Ghattas tells the enthralling and intimate story of Clinton’s political genius and unique style of diplomacy in her book, "The Secretary." Then, Dr. Craig Surman, author of "Fast Minds," discusses many ways adults can overcome ADHD and symptoms associated with attention deficit disorders, to live a not only a fulfilling life, but even thrive in their career and personal lives. Kim Ghattas and Dr. Craig Surman, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, when Hillary Clinton accepted the appointment as Secretary of State from her former rival, Barrack Obama, she focused on improving the perception of the United States in the eyes of the world. For four years, BBC foreign correspondent, Kim Ghattas had inside access to Clinton on her travels both domestic and abroad, while covering the US State Department. Lebanese born Ghattas tells the enthralling and intimate story of Clinton’s political genius and unique style of diplomacy in her book, “The Secretary.”

Then, individual symptoms such as forgetfulness, losing track of time, feelings of being stuck in a rut, impulsiveness can lead to distraction for anyone. It is even harder for individuals dealing with more than two of these symptoms from achieve their full potential and live a fulfilling life. Dr. Craig Surman, author of Fast Minds, discusses many ways adults can overcome ADHD and symptoms associated with attention deficit disorders, to live a not only a fulfilling life, but even thrive in their career and personal lives.

Kim Ghattas and Dr. Craig Surman, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Patriarch: The Remarkable Life of Joseph P. Kennedy

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Author David Nasaw gives and overview of the patriarch of the infamous Kennedy family, Joseph P. Kennedy. He discusses little known facts and the remarkable accomplishments of Joe Kennedy. Then, Letty Cottin Pogrebin, founder of Ms Magazine, discusses her tenth book, How to be a Friend to a Sick Friend. David Nasaw and Letty Cottin Pogrebin, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Joseph P. Kennedy, the founder of the political dynasty, survived turbulent times as he ensured his family would be one of the wealthiest, most powerful families in the 20th century. Although he came from a locally political family, Joseph Kennedy wanted more money and more power. With unlimited access to the JFK Presidential library papers, historian David Nasaw paints a contrastingly definitive picture of the compulsively ambitious businessman and loving father in his biography of Joseph P. Kennedy, “The Patriarch.”

Then, when a loved one diagnosed with a terminally ill disease it can be difficult to know what to say to them and how to act. Letty Cottin Pogrebin learned a lot about how she wanted people to act toward her while she was suffering with breast cancer. In her book, “How to be a Friend to a Friend Who’s Sick,” Pogrebin discusses many ways to be supportive of terminally ill loved ones while emphasizing the significance of their friendship. She says to be honest and up front with them from the very beginning.

David Nasaw and Letty Cottin Pogrebin , this week on Prime Time Radio.

Avoiding Depression and Anxiety in Later Life

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Mark Miller, MD and Charles Reynolds, MD discuss ways to identify and treat depression and anxiety in older Americans. Then, Jeff Yeager, the America's favorite cheapskate, gives lots of advice on how to save for retirement. Dr. Mark Miller, Charles Reynolds, and Jeff Yeager, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, m illions of Americans suffer from anxiety, depression, or both. Whether anxiety or depression is due to lifestyle choices, stress, or physical health issues, these mental disorders are especially common in later life. However, these disorders are an avoidable part of aging. In “Depression and Anxiety in Later Life,” Drs. Mark D. Miller and Charles F. Reynolds III, both geriatric psychiatrists, show how to minimize the effects of depression and anxiety by teaching sufferers how to better adapt to changing circumstances or when to get medical help.

Then, m ost retirement planning and lifestyle books focus on investing, “magic numbers,” or how to get the senior shopping discounts, but  America’s favorite cheapskate, and AARP expert, Jeff Yeager, makes the compelling case that you can have a joyous, worry-free retirement by merely spending smart, reusing some common household items, and focusing on what you truly want out of retirement.

Dr. Mark Miller, Dr. Charles Reynolds, and Jeff Yeager, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Guns at Last Light: Liberation of Europe in 1945

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Rick Atkinson gives the details of the epic story of D-Day and the 700 mile offensive that led to the triumphant liberation of Europe in, "The Guns at Last Light." Then Mary Beth Swan and Barbara Newman Mannix discuss the many aspects of Boomer Care Advocacy and what they are doing to help Boomers make the best choices possible when caring for aging relatives. Rick Atkinson, Mary Beth Swan, and Barbara Newman Mannix, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Rick Atkinson’s final volume of The Liberation Trilogy, “The Guns at Last Light,” is the epic story of D-Day and the 700 mile thrust to the heart of the Third Reich that led to the triumphant liberation of Europe from the perspective of Allied soldiers. With the stirring final volume of this monumental trilogy, Atkinson has produced the definitive chronicle of the war that unshackled a continent and preserved freedom in the West.

Then, 75 million baby boomers are coping with the challenges of aging relatives. They are facing some of the hardest decisions they will ever have to make. Some are reaching out to elder care advocates who provide relief and individual solutions that so many overwhelmed families and baby boomers desperately need.

Rick Atkinson, Mary Beth Swan, and Barbara Newman Mannix , this week on Prime Time Radio.

Cancer Rehab: Inside and Outside

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, the negative effects that cancer treatment takes on self-image is often overlooked. Realizing there is more to healing than medicine; Marianne Kelly started the first image recovery salon to help patients feel better about their looks. Then, Al Capp was at one time a household name, known both the comic strip, Lil Abner, and for his outspoken political views. Denis Kitchen, renowned comic artist writer in his own right, reveals the complete story of the complicated man behind the strip in a new biography. Dr. Julie Silver, Marianne Kelly, Denis Kitchen, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Dr. Julie Silver explains the psychological effects that cancer treatment can have on self-esteem and self-image. Although things like hair and make-up may seem superficial in regard fighting terminal illness, Marianne Kelly realized there was more to healing than medicine. She started the first image recovery salon at Johns Hopkins Cancer Center.  

Then, Al Capp was at one time a household name, known both for his work on the comic strip, Lil Abner, and for his outspoken political views. His notoriety reached astounding extremes highs and lows. Lil Abner ran for over forty years and at the height of its popularity, it reached ninety million viewers. However, behind the strip was a complicated man. Denis Kitchen, renowned comic artist writer in his own right, reveals the complete story of Al Capp in a new biography.    

Dr. Julie Silver, Marianne Kelly, Denis Kitchen , this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Extraordinary Life of the Notorious Gangster, Whitey Bulger

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, the notorious gangster James Whitey Bulger was the most wanted fugitive of his generation. In a probing new biography, Kevin Cullen and Shelley Murphy follow Whiteys extraordinary criminal career from childhood to capture. Then, average people across the country are profoundly improving the world unnoticed and without seeking recognition or praise. Bob Dotson tells the stories of extraordinary things people are doing to solve problems, help others in need, and create the true character of American culture. Kevin Cullen, Shelley Murphy, and Bob Dotson, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, the notorious gangster James “Whitey” Bulger was the most wanted fugitive of his generation before his capture in June of 2011. In a probing new biography, award-winning reporters Kevin Cullen and Shelley Murphy follow Whitey’s extraordinary criminal career from childhood to capture. They tell a gripping story of teenage thuggery and murder and the building of an underworld empire.

Then, average people across the country are profoundly improving the world unnoticed and without seeking recognition or praise. Bob Dotson tells the stories of extraordinary things people are doing to solve problems, help others in need, and create the true character of American culture.    

Kevin Cullen, Shelley Murphy, and Bob Dotson , this week on Prime Time Radio.

Amy Grant: Caring for My Dad

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

At a time when singer Amy Grant was emotionally struggling with her parents dementia, she had temporarily stopped touring to take care of her ill father. Grant talks about why her newest album, "How Mercy Looks from Here," is so dear to her heart and how her late mother inspired many of the lyrics. Then, when Hank Greenburg joined the Detroit Tigers in 1933, he was simultaneously cheered and insulted with anti-Semitic threats, but rose above it all. Author John Rosengren reveals the story of a life of integrity. Amy Grant and John Rosengren, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, at a time when Emmy winner and singer Amy Grant was emotionally struggling with her parent’s experience with dementia, she had temporarily stopped touring to take care of her ill father. Grant talks about why her newest album, How Mercy Looks from Here, is so dear to her heart and how her late mother inspired many of the lyrics. The album is a highly reflective and personal work that sums up recent events in her life from the death of her mother to care giving for her father. In this highly personal interview, Grant expresses her emotions tenderly and with amazing depth as an artist.

Then, when Hank Greenburg joined the Detroit Tigers in 1933, he was one of the most exciting sluggers in the game. As he rose to fame, he was usually cheered wherever he played. At the same time, he was also jeered and insulted, both on and off the field, suffering taunts and anti-Semitic threats. These hardships only drove him on to greater heights. Author John Rosengren reveals an intimate story of a life of integrity and triumph over adversity on and off the field.

Amy Grant and John Rosengren, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Living with and Understanding Alzheimer's

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, every year, about 450,000 Americans diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. The most helpful resource is experienced caregivers who have already learned to navigate this harrowing terrain. David Shenk explains the science of the disease and strategies families of sufferers can use to build comfortable and meaningful lives in a new series of short films. Then, every day for twenty-two years, it became harder for Katherine Bouton to hear what colleagues were saying. She had gone deaf in her left ear; her right was getting worse. She discusses the problem of midlife hearing loss. David Shenk and Katherine Bouton, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, every year, about 450,000 Americans are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Each diagnosis creates a ripple effect, as millions of family members are thrown into a terribly sad, confusing and time-consuming situation. Filmmaker David Shenk believes the best resource, by far, is experienced Alzheimer’s families, caregivers who have already spent years learning to navigate this harrowing terrain. Shenk emphasizes that while no one is glossing over the difficulty of the disease, he did ask the filmmakers to focus on solutions, tools and strategies families employ to carve out a comfortable and meaningful life in a new series of short films.

Then, for twenty-two years, Katherine Bouton had a secret that grew harder to keep every day. As an editor at The New York Times, and at daily editorial meetings she couldn’t hear what her colleagues were saying. She had gone profoundly deaf in her left ear; her right was getting worse. As she once put it, she was “the kind of person who might have used an ear trumpet in the nineteenth century.” Bouton discusses her new book, “Shouting Won’t Help,” a deftly written, deeply felt look at the widespread problem of midlife hearing loss. 

David Shenk and Katherine Bouton, this week on Prime Time Radio.

A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home and Frankenstein’s Cat

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Sensing an excess of talent in her dog, Pransky, Sue Halpern decided to get certified as a therapy dog team, and began visiting the local nursing home every Tuesday with her new partner. Pransky is not only a prolific therapist but a caring friend. She unfolds the story in her book, A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home. Then, Emily Anthes discusses what happens when the limits of animal genetic alteration are stretched. In her book, Frankensteins Cat, she explores how new biotechnology is shaping the future of humans and animals. Sue Halpern and Emily Anthes, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, sensing an excess of empathy and genius in her dog, Pransky, Sue Halpern decided to get certified as a therapy dog team. As it turns out, Pransky is not only a prolific therapist but a faithful, caring and snack loving friend. She begins visiting the local nursing home every Tuesday with her new partner, meeting a wide range of friendly, and rather unfriendly, residents. Halpern unfolds the story of how they plunged into a series of encounters that revealed depths of warmth, humor, and insight Halpern hadn’t yet seen in people or animals. She also discusses how the experince taught her the true nature of people and value of the good life in her book, A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home.

Then, for centuries, people have tinkered with the genetic make-up of our animal companions. We have bred dogs that herd and hunt, hairless housecats, and countless exotic teacup species that fit snugly in our laps. However, modern technology introduces vast new options for toying with life. Journalist Emily Anthes discusses what could happen when the limits of animal alteration are stretched, whether it’s engineering a cat that glows green, cloning the beloved family Fido, or curing disease. In her new book, Frankenstein’s Cat, she also explores how we are using this new biotechnology to shape the future of humans and animals.

Sue Halpern and Emily Anthes, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Curing Cancer on the Genetic Level

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Cutting edge advances in genetics are being made nearly every day in the fields of cloning and curing diseases allowing doctors to cure previously untreatable illnesses like cancer. Jessica Wapner, vividly unfolds the history of these discoveries in her new book, The Philadelphia Chromosome. Then, human nature is hardwired to avoid uncertainty and risk. In her new book, Stop Playing Safe, Margie Warrell shares techniques for unlocking the power of courage to achieve amazing in success in life and conquering the fear of failure. Jessica Wapner and Margie Warrell, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, cutting edge advances in the science of genetics are being made nearly every day. Whether in the field of cloning or curing diseases, these advances are continually allowing doctors to cure previously untreatable illnesses, especially cancer, and improve lives. Few may realize the quest to treat cancer began with an accidental discovery over fifty years ago. Science writer and journalist, Jessica Wapner, vividly unfolds the history of this medical discovery and explains the science behind it all in her new book, “The Philadelphia Chromosome.”

Then, ss a defense mechanism, human nature is hardwired to avoid uncertainty and risk. This phenomenon is especially apparent in an increasingly frenetic and competitive world. Every day brings along with it fresh experiences and new opportunities to learn and grow. These opportunities can often seem risky or dangerous. Master life coach, inspirational speaker and author, Margie Warrell, shares many techniques for unlocking the power of courage to speak out, break the status quo and achieve amazing success in life. Her new book, “Stop Playing Safe,” also contains many powerful tools and tips for living bolder and conquering the fear of failure.

Jessica Wapner and Margie Warrell, this week on Prime Time Radio.

When We Stop Living Our Lives for Ourselves

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Arlie Russell Hochschild discusses how outsourcing is changing the very nature of human relations. She explains the dangers and rewards of domestic outsourcing from personal life coaches to surrogate parents in her book, "The Outsourced Self." Then, Jaimal Yogis wanted to completely master the fear that ruled his life keeping him from accomplishing goals and finding love. In this interview, he tells some of the most harrowing stories of close encounters with great whites while surfing and how he formed new relationships on his quest to understand and conquer fear in his life in his book, "The Fear Project." Arlie Russell Hochschild and Jaimal Yogis, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, once a term used only in government and corporate settings, the word outsourcing has taken on many new meanings in the past few years. With the rise in popularity of social media, it now applies to our personal lives as well as our professional lives. Journalist and professor of sociology at University of California, Berkeley, Arlie Russell Hochschild, discusses the dangers and rewards of domestic outsourcing from personal life coaches to “wantologists” and wedding planners in her book, “The Outsourced Self.” Hochschild also tells Mike Cuthbert of Prime Time Radio how the process of hiring out the handling of minute details in our lives is changing the very nature of human relations.

Then, journalist Jaimal Yogis wanted to completely master the fear that he felt ruled his life. In the process, he plunged into great white shark-infested waters to surf deadly giant waves, moved to Hawaii with nothing but the cloths on his back, and formed some of the best relationships he’s ever known. Yogis explains to Mike Cuthbert of Prime Time Radio what his adventures in overcoming fear taught him about life, survival, and love. He also tells some of the most harrowing stories of close encounters with great whites while surfing, and interesting interviews with the people that study the science of fear in his book, “The Fear Project.”

Arlie Russell Hochschild and Jaimal Yogis, this week on Prime Time Radio.

War and the Life that Follows

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Brian Castner served three tours of duty in Iraq as the head of an Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit. When IEDs were discovered, he and his men would lead the way in either disarming the deadly devices. He tells the story of facing war and life that follows in his book, "The Long Walk." Then, historian Jim Steinmeyer explains the many different sources that Bram Stoker used to inspire his most bloodthirsty creation. His book, "Who was Dracula?" explores Stokers development as a writer and the real life inspirations for Dracula. Brian Castner and Jim Steinmeyer, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Brian Castner served three tours of duty in the Middle East, two of them in Iraq as the head of an Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit. Whenever IEDs were discovered, he and his men would lead the way in either disarming the deadly devices or searching through rubble and remains for clues to the bomb-makers’ identities. And when robots and other remote means failed, one technician would suit up and take the Long Walk to disarm the bomb by hand. When Castner returned to his wife and family, he faced another struggle against an internal enemy. He tells the story of facing war and life that follows in his book, “The Long Walk.”

Then, historian Jim Steinmeyer explains the many different sources that Bram Stoker used to inspire his most infamous and bloodthirsty creation. Sources include Oscar Wilde, Jack the Ripper and Stoker’s one time boss, actor Henry Irving. Steinmeyer’s book, “Who was Dracula?” explores Stokers development as a novelist and playwright, his involvement in London’s theatrical scene, to the real life inspirations for Count Dracula.

Brian Castner and Jim Steinmeyer, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Art of Urban Exploration

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, urban planner and adventurer Moses Gates describes his immersion in the worldwide subculture of urban exploration. He joined a world of people who create secret art galleries in subway tunnels, break into national monuments for fun, and travel the globe sleeping in centuries-old catacombs rather than hotels. Then, in 1836, nine-year-old Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches. Her story has been re-told over generations to become legend. Glenn Frankel explores the real history behind the classic film, The Searchers. Moses Gates and Glenn Frankel, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, urban planner and explorer Moses Gates describes his trespasses in some of the most illustrious cities in the world, from Paris to Cairo to Moscow. Gates describes his immersion in the worldwide subculture of urban exploration; how he joined a world of people who create secret art galleries in subway tunnels, break into national monuments for fun, and travel the globe sleeping in centuries-old catacombs rather than hotels or bed-and-breakfasts.

Then, in 1836 in East Texas, nine-year-old Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches. She was raised by the tribe and eventually became the wife of a warrior. Twenty-four years after her capture, she was reclaimed by the U.S. cavalry and Texas Rangers and restored to her white family, to die in misery and obscurity. Cynthia Ann's story has been told and re-told over generations to become a foundational American tale. Glenn Frankel explores the real history behind the story that became the legendary film by John Ford and John Wayne.

Moses Gates and Glenn Frankel, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Extraordinary Life of Rita Moreno

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Rita Moreno shares her remarkable journey from a young girl with simple beginnings in Puerto Rico to Hollywood legend and tells many more stories from her life and new memoir. Then,each year many thousands of pacemaker patients are denied MRIs because the procedure can cause harmful interactions with their device. Renowned actress Debbie Allen and radiologist Dr. Lee Friedman discuss Join the Pace Makers campaign to help spread the word to patients about MRI friendly pacemakers. Rita Morena, Debbie Allen, and Dr. Lee Friedman, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Rita Moreno shares her remarkable journey from a young girl with simple beginnings in Puerto Rico to Hollywood legend. She made her Broadway debut by age thirteen and moved quickly on to Hollywood in its Golden Age just a few years later. Moreno reflects on her struggles to break through Hollywood’s racial barriers in her new memoir.

Then, most patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers will need an MRI at one time or another. Each year many thousands of pacemaker patients are denied MRIs because the procedure can cause harmful interactions with their device. The FDA has now approved a new and improved pacemaker that is compatible with the MRI scans. Renowned actress Debbie Allen and Radiologist Dr. Lee Friedman are participating in the Join the Pace Makers campaign to help spread the word to patients about how important it is to have an open and informed conversation with their physicians about their treatment options.

Rita Morena, Debbie Allen, and Dr. Lee Friedman, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Inequality for All: The Danger of the Growing Gap between America's Richest and Poorest

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Robert Reich gives warning about a potential disaster for America in his new documentary, Inequality for All. This looming disaster, the growing gap between America's richest and poorest citizens, could carry serious consequences for the nations economy. Then, inspired by a chance encounter in Dubai with impoverished laborers, Bob Harris decided he would turn his own good fortune into an effort to make lives like theirs better. Harris discovered Kiva.org, through which individuals can make microloans to people in developing countries. Robert Reich and Bob Harris, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Robert Reich, the U.S. secretary of labor from 1993 to 1997 gives warning about a potential disaster for America in his new documentary, Inequality for All. This looming disaster, the growing gap between America’s richest and poorest citizens, is among the worst in for first world countries and could carry serious consequences for the nation’s economy.

Then, inspired by a chance encounter in Dubai with impoverished laborers, Bob Harris had an epiphany. He decided he would turn his own good fortune into an effort to make lives like theirs better. Harris found his way to Kiva.org, the leading portal through which individuals make microloans in developing countries. Harris has given many people around the world the opportunity to start small businesses and support themselves and their families, improving their livelihood dramatically.

Robert Reich and Bob Harris, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The National Senior Games and Athletes Ages 50 to 101

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, we discuss the National Senior Games, which are dedicated to promoting healthy and active lifestyles for athletes age 50 and over. Rich Browdie and marathoner Jeanne Rice explain the details the games from the variety sports to the different age groups. Then, based on extensive original interviews and archival research, Dina Hampton tells the compelling, interwoven life stories of three schoolmates that attended the Little Red school in New York City and their cultural impact on the sixties. Rich Browdie, Jeanne Rice, and Dina Hampton, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, we discuss the National Senior Games, which are dedicated to promoting healthy and active lifestyles for athletes age 50 and over. Rich Browdie and marathoner Jeanne Rice explain the details of how it is recognized as a multi-sport organization of the United States Olympic Committee. The games include many sports and age groups. The oldest athlete that participated at the 2013 games is 101.

Then, based on extensive original interviews and archival research, Dina Hampton tells the compelling, interwoven life stories of three schoolmates. Hampton weaves together their three tumultuous, divergent, public and private stories and how each affected the decade of the Sixties through the seminal events and political conflicts of recent American history, from the civil rights movement to the Vietnam War; the Summer of Love to the feminist uprising; Iran-Contra to Occupy Wall Street.

Rich Browdie, Jeanne Rice, and Dina Hampton, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Letter from Birmingham Jail and an Anthem for a Changing Nation

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, fifty years later the message of the Letter from Birmingham Jail still rings as true as the day it was written. Scholar Jonathan Rieder reveals the events leading up to the writing of the letter, giving fresh perspective on the author and his timeless message in the book, Gospel of Freedom. Then, Writer Mark Kurlansky explains how the song, Dancing in the Street, written by Marvin Gaye transcended pop culture and became an anthem for reform in a rapidly changing nation in his book, Ready for a Brand New Beat. Jonathan Rieder and Mark Kurlansky, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, “I am in Birmingham because there is injustice here,” declared Martin Luther King Jr., following with “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” Fifty years later these words from the Letter from Birmingham jail still ring as true as the day they were written in response to critical statements of King’s protest methods made by “moderate” clergy. Scholar Jonathan Rieder reveals the events leading up to the writing of the letter and how they influenced it’s content, giving fresh perspective on the author and his timeless message, in his book, “Gospel of Freedom.”   

Then, by the summer of 1964, the sixties were in full swing and Beatle-mania had taken the nation. At the same time, the Mississippi Summer Project was fully underway, the Vietnam War was just beginning, and the Civil Rights Act was passed. Some dubbed it the summer of freedom. But people became more radicalized in those few steamy months, and the song “Dancing in the Street” gained popularity as an activist anthem instead of a dance party hit. Writer Mark Kurlansky explains how the song written by Marvin Gaye transcended pop culture and became an anthem for a rapidly changing nation in his book, “Ready for a Brand New Beat.”  

Jonathan Rieder and Mark Kurlansky, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Future of Presidential Elections

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Dan Balz, uses sources from inside each campaign as well as his own observations of the race for the White House in 2012 to dissect how new strategies, laws, and outside influences may possibly forever change the process of presidential elections in his book, Collision 2012. Then, Daniel James Browns book, Boys in the Boat, tells how eight teenagers from the University of Washington were guided to a gold medal in rowing by their coach in the 1936 Berlin Olympics despite poverty and injury. Dan Balz and Daniel James Brown, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, in early 2009 a bright young presidential candidate named Barrack Obama took office with a message of hope and change and made history. Several years later he found himself embattled in a bitter divisive struggle for reelection as the Democratic candidate. His Republican opponent, Mitt Romney, former Governor of Massachusetts, faced controversies of his own while expertly exposing and exploiting weaknesses in the Democratic presidential campaign. Author and Journalist Dan Balz, uses sources from inside each campaign as well as his own observations of the race for the White House in 2012 to dissect how new strategies, laws, and outside influences such as Super PACs may possibly forever change the process of presidential elections.   

Then, it’s an emotional sports story of underdogs facing hardship and overcoming unfair odds to which continues to personify the American spirit and determination. They were eight teenagers from the University of Washington assembled and guided to a gold medal in rowing by an enigmatic coach in the 1936 Berlin Olympics despite poverty, sickness and injury. Daniel James Brown tells the emotional story of how these boys faith in each other helped them pull together to defeat elite opponents and capture the attention of an American audience caught in the midst of the Great Depression. His book, “Boys in the Boat,” tells how these young men forever changed the sport of rowing and gave hope to a nation.

Dan Balz and Daniel James Brown, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Martin Luther King Jr.'s Living Legacy

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, the youngest daughter of the late Coretta Scott King and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Bernice King discusses her father’s legacy on the 50th Anniversary of the "March for Jobs and Freedom," and her organization, "Be a King." Then, actor Harry Lennix discusses Hollywood’s portrayal of Black Americans. Lennix, a veteran actor and now producer, argues that there should be many more roles depicting Black Americans as well-adjusted fathers and husbands that are supportive of their families in everyday situations than actually exist. Bernice King and Harry Lennix, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, the youngest daughter of the late Coretta Scott King and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Bernice King began her public speaking career at the age of 17 when she first spoke in her mother’s stead at the United Nations. She discusses with Mike Cuthbert, host of Prime Time Radio, her father’s legacy on the 50th Anniversary of the “March for Jobs and Freedom,” her own work as a motivational speaker, and her organization, “Be a King.”

Then, actor Harry Lennix discusses Hollywood’s portrayal of Black Americans. He challenges the opinion that all depictions be as melodramatic as the butler in the White House, which seems to be the main style of portraying African-American figures, in historical and other roles. Lennix, a veteran actor and now producer, argues that there should be many more roles depicting Black Americans as less dramatic but still well-adjusted fathers and husbands that are supportive of their families in everyday situations. Lennix speaks about this imbalance in Hollywood and what he, as a producer, is doing to create more roles both positive and realistic.     

Bernice King and Harry Lennix, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Flu + You: Preventing the Flu in Older Americans

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, veteran actor Lee Majors discusses the risks of flu for older adults and is urging his peers to talk to their health care providers about why it can be so dangerous, what can be done to help prevent it and available vaccine options tailored for older adults. Then, Don McLean and Judy Collins discuss the state of the music industry, folk music, and life as each has lived it. McLean and Collins discuss some newer artists that they appreciate and how they have achieved such longevity in their careers. Lee Majors, Richard Birkel, Don McLean, and Judy Collins, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, the flu is often more severe for older adults because the immune system typically weakens with age, making it less able to mount an immune response to protect the body either when presented with a disease or in responding to a vaccination to prevent disease. This leaves older adults vulnerable to the flu. Lee Majors, best known for his role as the Six Million Dollar Man, recognizes his risk of flu and is urging his peers to talk to their health care providers about risks associated with flu and what can be done to help prevent it. Majors has partnered with the National Council on Aging on its Flu + You campaign to educate older adults and caregivers about the seriousness of the flu, the importance of prevention, and available vaccine options tailored for older adults.

Then, Don McLean and Judy Collins recently made a stop at Wolftrap in the Washington DC area to perform together. They take time out of their busy schedules to discuss the state of the music industry today, folk music, and life as each has lived it. McLean and Collins discuss some newer artists that they appreciate and how they’ve achieved such longevity in their careers.  

Lee Majors, Richard Birkel, Don McLean, and Judy Collins, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Teaching Older Adults How to Connect with New Technologies

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, older adults are quickly embracing the idea of using new technologies in everyday life. Tom Kamber, the founder of OATS, explains how the organization is dedicated to teaching the fundamentals of using new technology. Then, in a new era of information and transparency, the concept of power is transforming. New economies are challenging old superpowers and small businesses are successfully competing with giant corporations, and emerging technologies are slowly but surely changing the way everyone views the world. Tom Kamber and Moises Naim, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, older adults are embracing the idea of using new technologies to stay connected with the younger generations and generate income at a fast pace. However, there are so many different ways to interact with others now it can be hard to keep track of them all or know where to start learning. Older Adults Technology Services, OATS, is an organization dedicated to teaching the fundamentals of new technology and how to best use them. Tom Kamber, the founder and executive director of OATS explains.

Then, in a new era of information and transparency, the concept of power is transforming. New economies are challenging old superpowers and small businesses are successfully competing with invincible corporations, and emerging technologies are slowly but surely changing the way everyone views the world.     

Tom Kamber and Moises Naim, this week on Prime Time Radio.

One Foot Forward: A Discussion of End-of-Life Issues, Death, and Widowhood

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, photographer Judith Fox's book, One Foot Forward, tells the powerful stories of twenty widowed women and men, including Sue Holloway’s, with beautiful portraits to document bereavement, acceptance, and perseverance. Fox and Holloway speak about the life-altering death of a spouse. Then, singing makes thousands of amateur chorus members around the world happy. In her book, Imperfect Harmony, Stacy Horn, tells why her community choir is the one thing that never fails to bring her exuberant fulfillment. Judith Fox, Sue Holloway, and Stacy Horn, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, although very few people are comfortable talking about end-of-life issues, death, and widowhood, Judith Fox searched for many answers when her husband was terminally diagnosed. Her book, One Foot Forward, explores death, widowhood, and moving on after a loved one’s death while offering hope, solace, and the knowledge that no one is alone. She tells the powerful stories of twenty widowed women and men, including Sue Holloway’s, with beautiful portraits to document bereavement, acceptance, and perseverance. Fox and Holloway speak about the life-altering death of a spouse.

Then, for Stacy Horn, singing in a community choir is the one thing in her life that never fails to take her to a transcendent place and remind her that everything good is possible. She'll be the first to point out that she is not particularly religious and her voice isn't exactly the stuff of legend, but like thousands of other amateur chorus members throughout this country and the world, singing with other people makes her happy.

Judith Fox, Sue Holloway, and Stacy Horn, this week on Prime Time Radio.

The Diversity of Every Day Americans: The Glue that holds our Nation Together

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Philip Caputo journeys across the country from Key West to Alaska to find out how America remains united in spite of having an endlessly diverse population. He interviews an eclectic array of people from Cuban immigrants to Midwestern farmers and Inuit tribesman to answer his question. Then, veteran director, John Badham, discusses the art and finesse of directing movies in Hollywood. He uses examples from the many blockbusters he has directed to illustrate the key elements of a good movie scene. Philip Caputo and John Badham, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Philip Caputo journeys across the country from Key West to Alaska to find out how America remains united in spite of having an endlessly diverse population from every culture and race on the planet. He interviews an eclectic array of people from Cuban immigrants to Midwestern farmers and Inuit tribesman to answer this question. 

Then, veteran director, John Badham, discusses the art and finesse of directing movies in Hollywood. He uses examples from the many blockbusters he has directed to illustrate the key elements of a good movie scene.

Philip Caputo and John Badham, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Treme: The Tastes of New Orleans

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, chef Lolis Eric Elie, inspired by the award-winning television series Treme, created a collection of the best and most famous recipes from the Crescent City. Elie celebrates the culinary spirit of New Orleans and features recipes that highlight the character of the colorful city. Then, hospice care can offer relief for both the patient and loved ones by providing a medically trained caregiver. Eric Lindner discusses the all advantages to providing hospice care to a dying loved one or family member. Lolis Eric Elie and Eric Lindner, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, chef Lolis Eric Elie, inspired by the award-winning television series Treme, created a collection of the best and most famous recipes from the Crescent City. Elie celebrates the culinary spirit of New Orleans and features recipes that highlight the character of the colorful city. As rich as the series itself, the book, alos titled Treme, includes 100 heritage and contemporary recipes from the city's heralded and original recipes from renowned chefs and other Treme guest stars.

Then, terminal patients and their families face many hard decisions, especially when it comes to long term care. However, hospice care can offer emotional and physical relief for both the patient and loved ones by providing a medically trained caregiver. Eric Linder explains how a hospice caregiver can help preserve a dying patient’s sense of dignity by creating a supportive environment for all involved. Linder also tells the stories of those living the ends of their lives and celebrates the dignity with which they choose to exit this life.

Lolis Eric Elie and Eric Linder, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Finding the Words: When Sex Hurts

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Virginia Madsen has helped launch Finding the Words, a campaign empowering women to speak up and talk freely about painful intercourse that occurs due to menopause. Madsen gives encouragement to help women find their voice, shed their embarrassment, and discuss treatment with a doctor. Then, Fiddler on the Roof has had an incredible cultural impact and is loved by audiences from virtually every background. Author Alisa Solomon delves into the specifics of the landmark shows cultural relevance and its history. Virginia Madsen and Alisa Solomon, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Virginia Madsen feels passionately that there is one topic women should not keep silent about. She has helped launch Finding the Words, a campaign about empowering women to speak up and talk freely about painful intercourse that occurs due to menopause. Madsen gives encouragement to help them find their voice, shed their embarrassment, and discuss treatment with a doctor.

Then, Fiddler on the Roof has had an incredible cultural impact world-wide. It is loved by audiences from virtually every background and country.  And is performed everywhere from high schools to national theaters since it was released nearly fifty years ago. Author Alisa Solomon delves into the specifics of the landmark show’s cultural impact and the history of both it’s author and the show itself.

Virginia Madsen and Alisa Solomon, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Earth, Wind & Fire talks Now, Then and Forever

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, Earth, Wind & Fires Ralph Johnson and Verdine White discuss their newest album, Now, Then and Forever and reminisce about many of their past smash hits, while revealing some keys to their success in a wide range of musical genres. Then, songwriter to the stars, Tina Shafer, is a highly regarded vocal coach, songwriter, performer and the artistic director of The New York Songwriters Circle. She performs from her newest album and discusses the some of the secrets to her longevity. Ralph Johnson, Verdine White and Tina Shafer, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, cross-genre music legends, Earth, Wind & Fire have been storming along for over four decades and few groups of individuals have had longer or more successful musical careers. Ralph Johnson and Verdine White discuss their newest album, “Now, Then and Forever” and reminisce about many of their past smash hits, reveal some keys to their success in a wide range of musical genres. 

Then, a songwriter to the stars joins Prime Time Radio to explain the similarities and differences between composing and songwriting. Tina Shafer, the highly regarded vocal coach, songwriter, performer is the artistic director of The New York Songwriters Circle has had a prolific career in the music industry for nearly three decades. She performs from her newest album and discusses the some of the secrets to her longevity.

Ralph Johnson, Verdine White and Tina Shafer, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Thank You for Your Service

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, in Thank You for Your Service, David Finkel has entwined the stories of the deployment experiences of the 2-16 Infantry Battalion with the stories of their lives after they return to the States, painting a portrait of the soldier's struggles as well as those of their loved ones as they struggle to rebuild and overcome the mental scars of war. Then, in Reclaiming Our Democracy, Sam Daly-Harris, explains how we the people can take control of our nation back by influencing government officials through direct communication. David Finkel and Sam Daly-Harris, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, in Thank You for Your Service, David Finkel has entwined the stories of the deployment experiences of the 2-16 Infantry Battalion with the stories of their lives after they return to the States. Finkel spends time with them they try to recover, and and reintegrate into their families and communities, painting a portrait of the soldier's struggles as well as those of their loved ones as they struggle to rebuild and overcome the mental scars of war.

Then, In Reclaiming Our Democracy, Sam Daly-Harris, explains how "we the people" can take control of our nation back by influencing government officials through direct communication.

David Finkel and Sam Daly-Harris, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Avoiding the Next Financial Crisis by Focusing on Improving Education

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, the Secretary General of the OECD, Angel Gurria, discusses how the organizations work is based on continued monitoring of major educational events around the world including regular projections of economic developments. Then, renowned author, Terry McMillans new novel, Who Asked You?, casts an intimate look at the burdens and blessings of family and trusting your own judgment even when others dont agree. She also discusses marriage, family, her writing and her lifes path with stand in Prime time Radio host, Bill Newcott. Angel Gurria and Terry McMillan, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, the Secretary General of the OECD, Angel Gurria, discusses how the organization's work is based on continued monitoring of events in member countries as well as outside OECD area, and includes regular projections of short and medium-term economic developments. They collect and analyze data about education and economics to help direct our nation toward more a competitive and simultaneously cooperative place in the world.

Then, renowned author, Terry McMillan's new novel, "Who Asked You?", casts an intimate look at the burdens and blessings of family and speaks to trusting your own judgment even when others don’t agree. McMillan’s signature voice and unforgettable characters bring universal issues to brilliant, vivid life. Her first book, Mama, was self-promoted. She achieved national attention in 1992 with her third novel, Waiting to Exhale, which remained on The New York Times bestseller list for many months. She discusses marriage, family, her writing and her life's path with stand in Prime time Radio host, Bill Newcott.

Angel Gurria and Terry McMillan, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Modern Death, Fall Flicks, Lung Cancer Screening, Alzheimer's Intro, and Cost of Kids

From 2BoomerBabes Radio Hour | Part of the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour series | 54:55

First, an award-winning science writer, who like millions of baby boomers, helped care for her aging parents, explores the grueling moral choices we all face when the terror of death collides with modern medicine. Then, Bill Newcott, of AARP's Movies for Grown-ups, highlights the must-see flicks for the fall and holidays! Also, lung cancer awareness: A doctor reveals how regular screenings might just save your life. An introduction to, "Beyond the Face of Alzheimer’s", a new series exploring the personal impact of the disease. And, if you ever wonder why you’re so broke, find out how much it really costs to raise a child! All this week on he 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

2_boomer_babes_radio_small First, Katy Butler is an award-winning science writer, who like millions of baby boomers, helped care for her aging parents, explores the grueling moral choices we all face when the terror of death collides with modern medicine. Then, Bill Newcott, of AARP's Movies for Grown-ups, highlights the must-see flicks for the fall and holidays! Also, lung cancer awareness: A doctor reveals how regular screenings might just save your life. An introduction to, "Beyond the Face of Alzheimer’s", a new series exploring the personal impact of the crippling disease. And, if you've ever wondered why you’re so broke, maybe it's because of your children, find out how much it really costs to raise a kid! All this week on he 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

A Doctor and Patient Discuss New Knee Surgeries and Getting Back to Sports

From AARP Radio | 59:54

First, Dr.Stefan Kreuzer is pioneering the development of new minimally invasive hip and knee replacement surgery. These next generation implants are helping patients such as Steve Quick recover faster and get back to the active lifestyle they are used to leading. Then, since being diagnosed with prostate cancer, Jack McCallum, wanted to clear up the confusion, misconceptions, and conflicting medical advice that so many men struggle with when thinking about the disease in his book, The Prostate Monologues. Dr. Stefan Kreuzer, Steve Quick and Jack McCallum, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, pioneering the development in Minimally Invasive and Computer Assisted hip and knee replacement surgery, Dr.Stefan Kreuzer, is changing surgical techniques for surgeons for the better. These next generation of knee and hip implants, are helping patients recover faster and get back to the active lifestyle they are used to leading.

Then, since being diagnosed with prostate cancer, Jack McCallum, wanted to clear up the confusion, misconceptions, and conflicting medical advice that so many men struggle with when thinking about the disease. So he promptly got to work writing The Prostate Monologues. Through his own experiences, McCallum tackles the tough questions and decisions that men are forced to make with honesty, humor, and insight.

Dr. Stefan Kreuzer, Steve Quick and Jack McCallum, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Futuristic Suburbs, Beautiful Neighborhoods, Incubating Food, Barb's Story, and Fashion Forward

From 2BoomerBabes Radio Hour | Part of the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour series | 54:52

First, the Babes explore the changes in where we live, how modern suburbia has morphed, and what is driving these trends. Then, Neighbors from Hell, gives advice for neighbors about settling disputes before they escalate into out-right warfare. Then, the Babes tell the story of Union Kitchen, which offers communal kitchen facilities to small business owners in the Washington, D.C. area. Then, co-host Barbara Kline shares her family's personal experience with caring for their father who is suffering from Alzheimer’s. It is the first segment in a new series, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's, which will offer inspiration, serve as comfort, and be a guide to those just beginning the Alzheimer's journey. Finally, Betty Shubert, author of Out-of-Style, explains fashion to the Babes how fashion has evolved through the decades! This week, on the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

2_boomer_babes_radio_thumb_small First, the Babes explore the changes in where we live, how modern suburbia has morphed, and what is driving these trends. Then, Neighbors from Hell, gives advice for neighbors about settling disputes before they escalate into out-right warfare.

Also, the Babes tell the story of Union Kitchen, which offers communal kitchen facilities to small business owners in the Washington, D.C. area. This novel concept allows aspiring entrepreneurs to start their dream business without independently taking on enormous risks and costs. 

Then, co-host Barbara Kline shares her family's personal experience with caring for their father who is suffering from Alzheimer’s. It is the first segment in a new series, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's, which will offer inspiration, serve as comfort, and be a guide to those just beginning the Alzheimer's journey.

Finally, Betty Shubert, author of Out-of-Style, explains fashion to the Babes how fashion has evolved through the decades! Betty has designed clothes and costumes for stage, screen, television, Las Vegas musicals, and Disneyland.  

This week, on the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

The Bully Pulpit: The Presidents and the Golden Age of Journalism

From AARP Radio | 59:54

First, Doris Kearns Goodwin's new book, The Bully Pulpit, brings her trademark blend of scholarly research, intellectual engagement, and enthralling storytelling to a turbulent relationship between two iconic presidents during an era called the Golden Age of Journalism. Goodwin explores and discusses Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft and the muckraker journalists. Then, Dr. Barbara Krantz, the Medical Director of Research at Hanley Center, describes how addiction affects Boomers differently and new research that will help those struggling with addiction. Doris Kearns Goodwin and Dr. Barbara Krantz, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, Doris Kearns Goodwin discusses her first book in 8 years. Titled, The Bully Pulpit, it brings her trademark blend of scholarly research, intellectual engagement, and enthralling storytelling to a turbulent relationship between two presidents, Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, in an era called the Golden Age of Journalism. Goodwin explores the lives of these two historical figures which most encapsulate the rise of muckraker journalism. She also questions whether we are in a new gilded age, or whether politicians are just using new technologies to regulate the old relationship between government and business. Regardless old the answer, The Bully Pulpit transports us to a time that forever changed the nature of journalism and enlightened our nation.

Then, it is a common stereotype that younger Boomers used many drugs in the sixties and seventies, an era in which it was socially acceptable. However, that same generation is often overlooked when it comes to substance abuse in the new millennium. Because of their socialization structure, there are unique issues that need to be addressed when it comes to addiction and drug abuse. Dr. Barbara Krantz, Director of Medical Services and the Medical Director of Research at Hanley Center, describes how addiction affects Boomers differently and new research that will help those struggling with addiction by approaching them at an intellectual level to explain why they need to be treated by specific methods.

Doris Kearns Goodwin and Dr. Barbara Krantz, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Best Winter Vacation Destinations and Stress Free Deals

From AARP Radio | 59:54

First, whether you would like to relocate in retirement or just take a vacation, many tools are available to lower the stress of winter vacation travel. AARP expert, Samantha Brown, gives many tips and tools for finding great winter destinations at lower prices. Then, Frosty the Snowman is one of the most magical winter songs. Kenny Loggins brings the classic back to life once again giving it an enchanting new interpretation that both children and adults can enjoy. Samantha Brown and Kenny Loggins, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, whether you would like to relocate in retirement or just take a vacation, many tools are available to lower the stress of winter vacation travel. AARP expert, Samantha Brown, gives many tips and tools for finding great winter destinations at lower prices.

Then, Frosty the Snowman is one of the most magical winter songs.  Kenny Loggins brings the classic back to life once again giving it an enchanting new interpretation that both children and adults can enjoy. He also discusses many other of his new recordings that are geared for both children and adults.

Samantha Brown and Kenny Loggins, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Epic Aviators, Power Words, Novel Cures, Alzheimer's, and Ultimate Cheapskate

From AARP Radio | 54:51

First, Winston Groom is the author of fourteen books including the best-seller Forrest Gump, and now, The Aviators. Then, Helen Elaine Lee, professor of writing at MIT and author of The Serpent's Gift. She shares her experience of volunteering for the past 12 years to teach a creative writing class inside of a Massachusetts Prison. Also, Susan Elderkin gives novel cures for any sort of ailment. She explains that there is a novel for any sickness. Then, Dr. Rosemary Laird specializes in the care and treatment of persons with Alzheimer's and related dementia. And, after years as a management professional tightening financial corporate belts, Jeff Yeager decided to take a dose of his own medicine. He reduced his dependency on money, retired, and is now "selfishly employed." This week we explore the epic age of flight, the power of words, family time, Alzheimer's, and the ultimate cheapskate.

2_boomer_babes_radio_thumb_small First, Winston Groom is the author of fourteen books including the best-seller Forrest Gump, and now, The Aviators. Then, Helen Elaine Lee, professor of writing at MIT and author of The Serpent's Gift. She shares her experience of volunteering for the past 12 years to teach a creative writing class inside of a Massachusetts Prison. Also,Also, Susan Elderkin gives novel cures for any sort of ailment. She explains that there is a novel for any sickness. Then, Dr. Rosemary Laird specializes in the care and treatment of persons with Alzheimer's and related dementia. And, after years as a management professional tightening financial corporate belts, Jeff Yeager decided to take a dose of his own medicine. He reduced his dependency on money, retired, and is now "selfishly employed." This week we explore the epic age of flight, the power of words, family time, Alzheimer's, and the ultimate cheapskate.

PTR How to be a Man and the Good House

From AARP Radio | 59:54

First, author Colum McCann discusses what a man is by examining a collection of essays and short stories written by today’s top male writers from around the world titled, The Book of Men. Then, Ann Leary discusses her new novel, The Good House. Leary reveals which characters and experiences are based closely on real life. Colum McCann and Ann Leary, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, what is man is a question that has been asked more times than can be counted. Author Colum McCann discusses what a man is by examining a collection of essays and short stories written by today’s top male writers from around the world titled, The Book of Men.

Then, Ann Leary discusses her new novel, The Good House. It is an exploration of small town life, New England culture, love and friendship. Leary reveals which characters and experiences are based closely on real life.

Colum McCann and Ann Leary, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Civil Divorce, Survival Lessons, Shark Attack!, Alzheimer's Series, and Today's Ettiqutte

From 2BoomerBabes Radio Hour | Part of the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour series | 54:51

Divorcing like civil adults, fresh perspectives and taking control of life, shark attacks and habits, Alzheimer's, and manners for modern times. All this week on the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

2_boomer_babes_radio_small First, celebrity divorce attorney, Laura Wasser, discusses how simplify the divorce proccess while keeping it civil and preserving family ties. Then, in her book, Survival Lesson, author Alice Hoffman reflects about her personal battle with breast cancer and taking control of life. Then, Ralph Collier, the author of Shark Attacks of the Twentieth Century, and he reveals the myths and facts of sharks. Then, continueing the series, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's. And, expert Celia Rivenbark, author of Rude Bitches Make Me Tired, helps us understand proper etiquette for today's rapidly changing world.
Divorcing like adults, perspective and taking control of life, shark attacks, Alzheimer's, and manners, this week on the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

The Bells of the National Cathedral

From AARP Radio | 01:01:59

Prime Time Radio celebrates the resilient spirit and hope of the holiday season with an hour-long special featuring the beautiful bells of the historic Washington National Cathedral’s carillon. Host Mike Cuthbert ascended the bell tower and sat in the “wheelhouse” with distinguished carillonneur Edward Nassor, who melodiously played the bells exclusively for Prime Time Radio. Mike and he also had a fascinating conversation about the history and workings of the bells.
Edward Nassor, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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Prime Time Radio celebrates the resilient spirit and hope of the holiday season with an hour-long special featuring the beautiful bells of the historic Washington National Cathedral’s carillon. Host Mike Cuthbert ascended the bell tower and sat in the “wheelhouse” with distinguished carillonneur Edward Nassor, who melodiously played the bells exclusively for Prime Time Radio. Mike and he also had a fascinating conversation about the history and workings of the bells.

Edward Nassor, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Provence 1970, Final Curtain Call, Fun Family Time, Alzheimer's, and Spending Detox

From AARP Radio | 54:51

First, in the winter of 1970, six iconic culinary greats seized an opportunity to gather in the South of France and change America's taste preferences. The group included none other than Julia Child, James Beard, and the pioneering food writer M.F.K. Fisher. Luke Barr, M.F.K. Fisher's nephew. Then, William McDonald, the obituaries editor of the New York Times, also edits The Obits 2013, a "who's-who" of some of the most fascinating people who died this past year after making their mark on the world. Then, travel guru Deb Stone returns to share some out-of-the-box family reunion destinations that will keep the whole family smiling and happy. Then, another segment of "Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's" explores receiving care while also giving care. And lastly, "The Ultimate Cheapskate" and the author of The Cheapskate Next Door, Jeff Yeager, explains a spending detox. Provence 1970, Final Curtain Call, Fun Family Time, Alzheimer's, and Spending Detox, this week on the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

2_boomer_babes_radio_thumb_small First, in the winter of 1970, six iconic culinary greats seized an opportunity to gather in the South of France and change America's taste preferences. The group included none other than Julia Child, James Beard, and the pioneering food writer M.F.K. Fisher. Luke Barr, M.F.K. Fisher's nephew. Then, William McDonald, the obituaries editor of the New York Times, also edits The Obits 2013, a "who's-who" of some of the most fascinating people who died this past year after making their mark on the world. Then, travel guru Deb Stone returns to share some out-of-the-box family reunion destinations that will keep the whole family smiling and happy. Then, another segment of "Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's" explores receiving care while also giving care. And lastly, "The Ultimate Cheapskate" and the author of The Cheapskate Next Door, Jeff Yeager, explains a spending detox. Provence 1970, Final Curtain Call, Fun Family Time, Alzheimer's, and Spending Detox, this week on the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

Brain on Fire, Shopping Local, Living Histories, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's, and Going Live

From AARP Radio | 54:51

First, Susannah Cahalan shares the story of her lost month, a descent into madness and the diagnosis that reclaimed her life. Then, Bill Rancic explains the importance of shopping locally, especially during this holiday season. Then, Linda Packer, of Past Forward Living Histories, explains capturing life stories and preserving them, the 21st century way. Then, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's. And lastly, Darren Johnson, the author of Going Live, shares some of his eventful tales of corporate event planning for the likes of Microsoft, Coca-Cola, Disney, and more. Brain on Fire, Shopping Local, Living Histories, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's, and Going Live, this week, on the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

2_boomer_babes_radio_thumb_small First, Susannah Cahalan shares the story of her lost month, a descent into madness and the diagnosis that reclaimed her life. Then,  Bill Rancic explains the importance of shopping locally, especially during this holiday season. Then, Linda Packer, of Past Forward Living Histories, explains capturing life stories and preserving them, the 21st century way. Then, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's. And lastly, Darren Johnson, the author of Going Live, shares some of his eventful tales of corporate event planning for the likes of Microsoft, Coca-Cola, Disney, and more. Brain on Fire, Shopping Local, Living Histories, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's, and Going Live, this week, on the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

Trip to Echo Spring

From AARP Radio | 59:54

First, in The Trip to Echo Spring, Olivia Laing examines the link between creativity and excessive drinking through the work and lives of six writers whose literature is some of the most famous in the world. All six of these writers were well-known alcoholics, and the subject of drinking is often tackled in some of their finest work. Then, New York Citys Harlem was a cultural center in the 1920's that represented time of social freedom., but women who embraced black culture too enthusiastically could be ostracized. Olivia Laing and Carla Kaplan, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Default-piece-image-1 First, in The Trip to Echo Spring, Olivia Laing examines the link between creativity and excessive

drinking through the work and lives of six writers whose literature is some of the most famous in

the world. All six of these writers were well-known alcoholics, and the subject of drinking is often

tackled in some of their finest work.

Then, New York City's Harlem was an cultural center in the 1920's that represented time of social

freedom. White men could go uptown to see jazz and modern dance, but women who embraced

black culture too enthusiastically could be ostracized. Carla Kaplan's, Miss Ann of Harlem explores

the lives of six women who crossed race lines and defied social conventions to become a part of

the culture and heartbeat of Harlem.

Olivia Laing and Carla Kaplan, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Yoga Store Murder, Gotta Go, Reunion Anxiety, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's, and Spa Sleuths

From 2BoomerBabes Radio Hour | Part of the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour series | 54:52

First, Dan Morse discusses a crime took place in an upscale, quiet suburb of Washington D.C., that shocked the area and the nation. Then, Dr. Briana Walton is a board certified Urogynecologist and the Director of the Women's Center for Pelvic Health at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis, Maryland. She joins us to talk about this difficult subject and what we can do about it. Then, Dr. Jane Bluestein, offers tips for attending, surviving, and even enjoying your high school reunion. This week we continue our series, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's, and explore the dynamics of the role reversal: children caring for their parents with Alzheimer's. And, Barb and Kathy decided to track down, and test some of the best spas around starting with an overnight to the Chesapeake Bay Golf Resort, Spa, & Marina. Rose Hiro, the Hyatt's spa manager, reveals the latest in spa treatments and how to get the most bang for our spa bucks! Dan Morse, Dr. Briana Walton, Dr. Jane Bluestein, and Rose Hiro, this week on the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

2_boomer_babes_radio_small First, Dan Morse discusses a crime took place in an upscale, quiet suburb of Washington D.C., that shocked the area and the nation. Then, Dr. Briana Walton is a board certified Urogynecologist and the Director of the Women's Center for Pelvic Health at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis, Maryland. She joins us to talk about this difficult subject and what we can do about it. Then, Dr. Jane Bluestein, offers tips for attending, surviving, and even enjoying your high school reunion. This week we continue our series, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's, and explore the dynamics of the role reversal: children caring for their parents with Alzheimer's. And, Barb and Kathy decided to track down, and test some of the best spas around starting with an overnight to the Chesapeake Bay Golf Resort, Spa, & Marina. Rose Hiro, the Hyatt's spa manager, reveals the latest in spa treatments and how to get the most bang for our spa bucks! Dan Morse, Dr. Briana Walton, Dr. Jane Bluestein, and Rose Hiro, this week on the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

Medicare and the Affordable Care Act

From AARP Radio | 59:54

First, AARP expert, Patricia Barry, gives fast and easy tips to get up to speed on Medicare in general, and how it is affected by the Affordable Care Act. Her new book, Medicare for Dummies, addresses uncertain topics and helps maneuver the complicated process. Then, the other talk helps you take control of the rest of your life so your kids can make decisions based on what you want. Tim Prosch gives great advice groundbreaking and practical advice you need to have open, honest discussions in his new book, The Other Talk. Patricia Barry and Tim Prosch, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, AARP expert, Patricia Barry, gives fast and easy tips to get up to speed on Medicare in general, and how it is affected by the Affordable Care Act. With 77 million baby boomers entering the program, questions about what Medicare is and how it affects seniors are certain to arise. Her new book, Medicare for Dummies, addresses this uncertain topic and helps those eligible for Medicare benefits maneuver the complicated process.

Then, the other talk helps you take control of the rest of your life so your kids can make decisions based on what you want. Tim Prosch gives great advice groundbreaking and practical advice you need to have open, honest discussions about subjects that can be difficult to talk about. His new book, The Other Talk, gives you the tools to develop a strong partnership with your kids to plan for the rest of your life.

Patricia Barry and Tim Prosch, this week on Prime Time Radio.

Second Acts, Happy Money, A Dog's World, Beyond The Face of Alzheimer's, and the Boomer Dudes

From 2BoomerBabes Radio Hour | Part of the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour series | 54:51

First, Rob Romasco, AARP's President, gives his take on aging and what he sees as the biggest issues facing boomers and gives solutions for the 50+ generation. Then, Dr.Elizabeth Dunn, co-author of Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending, shares tips for getting a bigger emotional bang for our hard-earned bucks. Also, Deveka Christie, co-owner of No Leash Needed, a dog's only facility located in St. Louis. Then, in the next segment of the ongoing, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's series, more insight into the care givers and family most affected by this ravaging didease. And, executive producer, Angel Livas turns the tables on Barb and Kathy and interviews their 2 Boomer Dudes to find out what's it like to live with these Babes, morning, noon, and night? The BoomerDudes tell all! Rob Romasco, Dr. Elizabeth Dunn, Deveka Christie, Patti Hoffman, Russ Graziano, Dr. Jason Karlawish, Doug Kline, and Bill Bernard, this week on the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

2_boomer_babes_radio_thumb_small First, Rob Romasco, AARP's President, gives his take on aging and what he sees as the biggest issues facing boomers and gives solutions for the 50+ generation. Then, Dr.Elizabeth Dunn, co-author of Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending, shares tips for getting a bigger emotional bang for our hard-earned bucks. Also, Deveka Christie, co-owner of No Leash Needed, a dog's only facility located in St. Louis. Then, in the next segment of the ongoing, Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's series, more insight into the care givers and family most affected by this ravaging didease. And, executive producer, Angel Livas turns the tables on Barb and Kathy and interviews their 2 Boomer Dudes to find out what's it like to live with these Babes, morning, noon, and night? The BoomerDudes tell all! Rob Romasco, Dr. Elizabeth Dunn, Deveka Christie, Patti Hoffman, Russ Graziano,  Dr. Jason Karlawish, Doug Kline, and Bill Bernard, this week on the 2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour.

Tips for Selecting the Best Affordable Care Act Plan for You

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

First, choosing a healthcare plan is about cost and more importantly knowing which physicians are covered at the best hospitals. Dr. Archelle Georgiou and Dr. Paul Fronstin give advice for selecting the best personalized affordable care act plan and finding great doctors at the best hospitals. Then, millions of Americans brave the challenges and enormous pressure of caring for a loved one while continuing to work fulltime. Amy Goyer provides practical resources in her book, Juggling Work and Caregiving. Dr. Archelle Georgiou, Dr. Paul Fronstin and Amy Goyer, this week on Prime Time Radio.

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First, choosing a healthcare plan is about cost and more importantly knowing which physicians are covered at the best hospitals. Dr. Archelle Georgiou and Dr. Paul Fronstin give advice for selecting the best personalized affordable care act plan and finding great doctors at the best hospitals. They simply explain what people need to know when selecting a plan and how free resources like Healthgrades can get them started on getting the best plan.

Then, millions of Americans brave the challenges and enormous pressure of caring for a loved one while continuing to work fulltime. AARP Expert, Amy Goyer, provides practical resources and tips, whether you're caregiving day to day or planning for future needs. Her book, Juggling Work and Caregiving, provides insight, and personal inspiration from her own experience as a caregiver to her parents.

Dr. Archelle Georgiou, Dr. Paul Fronstin and Amy Goyer, this week on Prime Time Radio.