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Compiled By: Monique Hicks

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No Praise, No Blame, Just So.

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | 07:43

Twelve years ago, tragedy struck the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament.

Default-piece-image-1 Years later, the small group of contemplative nuns reflects on forgiveness and faith.

Anybody Want to Try This?

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | 06:09

With a bizarre hobby comes bizarre stories.

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Wayne Holmquist has an unusual hobby. He is a dowser. As Wayne puts it he has been learning how to dowse since age six and he is now in his eighties. His uncommon hobby has led to some unusual experiences.

Placed in Bedlam

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | 07:19

Nine year old Gary Hayman ran away from a Rhode Island mental hospital in 1952 and sparked the biggest manhunt in state history.

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The Exeter School for the Feeble Minded operated from 1908 to 1993. Its safe to say the school did more harm than good. Legends of what happened here are spread all around New England. Some of them are true and some are false. The story of the nine year old runaway Gary Hayman is true and chlling.

A Christmas Carol

From Rob MacClanahan | Part of the The Time Traveler series | 02:51:09

Jacob Marley, Ebenezer Scrooge and company -- and several spirits -- tell a tale of redemption...

Ebenezer_scrooge__alastair_sim__small Rob MacClanahan brings Ebenezer Scrooge and the voice of Alastair Sim from the silver screen to your radio together with fun facts about Charles Dickens and the 1951 film, uncalled for commentary, and music!  It's all right here on THE TIME TRAVELER, broadcasting every Monday late night on 95.1FM KFOK (Georgetown, California) and streaming live around the earth courtesy of kfok.org 

This is a holiday themed warm-up for next week's 2015 Christmas special, starring Ralph Fiennes as Jesus Christ in "The Miracle Maker".

A Christmas Carol

From KRCU | 59:00

A sound-rich audio drama of the famous Charles Dickens story.

Playing
A Christmas Carol
From
KRCU

Default-piece-image-0 Hear the ghosts of Christmas come alive this holiday season with this special radio adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic A Christmas Carol. Children and adults alike will love this rendition of this heart-warming Christmas favorite. The myriad of sound effects and musical cues puts the listener right there with the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future.

Peeing in my pants: Everybody does it

From Lauren Whaley | 08:40

Urinary incontinence is more common than you think, but it's tough to talk about. Learn about all the treatments and technologies that can treat it.

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Some studies suggest that one out of 10 women in their 30s are peeing themselves. Others say the numbers could be much much higher. But it’s tough to talk about. Peeing in your pants is embarrassing. With so many women suffering, it's time to talk about this growing problem. Fortunately, there are medical professionals, treatments and and a whole crop of new technologies that can help.

GREAT Theatre and KVSC Radio Present Nigh of the Living Dead!

From KVSC | Part of the Untold Stories of Central Minnesota series | 01:13:54

Before Southerners hid in prisons and had to deal with barbed wire baseball bats and governors . . .

Before the overrun shopping malls . . .

Before Brad Pitt made a movie that had little to do with the book . . .

There was where it all started . . . Night of the Living Dead!

When you’re hiding out in the cellar trying not to get eaten, join GREAT Theatre for their gruesome adaptation of George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead!

Broadcast LIVE from the Helgeson Learning Lab Theater on Saturday, October 27, 2018, this is the second year of KVSC Radio and GREAT Theatre’s partnership to bring classic radio drama to your Halloween season!

Enjoy!

. . . while you can.

Notld_performance1_small

Before Southerners hid in prisons and had to deal with barbed wire baseball bats and governors . . . 
Before the overrun shopping malls . . .
Before Brad Pitt made a movie that had little to do with the book . . .
There was where it all started . . . Night of the Living Dead!
When you’re hiding out in the cellar trying not to get eaten, join GREAT Theatre for their gruesome adaptation of George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead! 
Broadcast LIVE from the Helgeson Learning Lab Theater on Saturday, October 27, 2018, this is the second year of KVSC Radio and GREAT Theatre’s partnership to bring classic radio drama to your Halloween season!
Enjoy!
. . . while you can. 

The Untold Story of African American History in St. Cloud, Minnesota with Christopher Lehman

From KVSC | Part of the Untold Stories of Central Minnesota series | 27:49

In today’s installment of the Untold Stories of Central Minnesota, Arts & Cultural Heritage Producer Jeff Carmack talks with SCSU Ethic Studies Professor Christopher Lehman.

Lehman has a new book coming out this fall through the Minnesota Historical Society Press called “Slavery’s Reach” that discusses the different ways that slavery affected Minnesota before, during, and after the Civil War. He also presentied at Jule’s Bistro in St. Cloud on Wednesday, June 26, 2019 as part of SCSU’s College of Liberal Arts Anabranch program with a program focused on the history of African Americans in St. Cloud.

This program is funded in part by a Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Legacy Grant.

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In today’s installment of the Untold Stories of Central Minnesota, Arts & Cultural Heritage Producer Jeff Carmack talks with SCSU Ethic Studies Professor Christopher Lehman.  

Lehman has a new book coming out this fall through the Minnesota Historical Society Press called “Slavery’s Reach” that discusses the different ways that slavery affected Minnesota before, during, and after the Civil War.  He also presentied at Jule’s Bistro in St. Cloud on Wednesday, June 26, 2019 as part of SCSU’s College of Liberal Arts Anabranch program with a program focused on the history of African Americans in St. Cloud.

This program is funded in part by a Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Legacy Grant.

At First Blush (#1529)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

Book recommendations and the art of apology. Martha and Grant share some good reads, including an opinionated romp through English grammar, a Spanish-language adventure novel, an account of 19th-century dictionary wars, and a gorgeously illustrated book of letters to young readers. Plus, what's the best language for conveying a heartfelt apology? Ideally, an apology won't be the end of a conversation. Rather, it will be the beginning of one. Plus, a brain-busting word quiz, snow job, clean as a whistle, high muckety-muck, tip us your daddle, and a wet bird never flies at night.

39694088401_23aa701d02_m_1__small Dreyer's English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style is a highly opinionated, helpful resource for anyone who wants to become a better writer.


Which phrase conveys a more heartfelt, sincere apology: I'm sorry or I apologize? The answer depends less on word choice and more on context. Some useful books about the art of apologizing: Sorry About That by Edwin Batistella and I Was Wrong by Nick Smith. On the SorryWatch website, writers Susan McCarthy and Marjorie Ingall weigh in on various apologies in the news.


In A Velocity of Being, a collection of letters to young readers, writer Alexander Chee offers reasons as to why he became a reader himself.


Fourteen-year-old Harry from Charlotte, Vermont, asks why we say something is clean as a whistle. The phrase refers not to a physical whistle, but to the purity of the sibilant sound.


Quiz Guy John Chaneski's puzzle is about common bonds among seemingly unrelated words. For example, name the one word that unites the following three items: report card, USDA inspected beef, incline.


Rachel from San Diego, California, says that her grandfather would occasionally answer questions with the phrase wet ducks don't fly at night. It's a variation of a wet bird never flies at night, a phrase that figures in a goofy joke about searching for the meaning of life. The phrase was popularized by deadpan comedian Jackie Vernon, who recorded a comedy album by that name.


On our Facebook group, listeners discuss sayings that people use when they're sitting around a campfire and smoke comes their way. Among them: I hate rabbits, I hate little white bunny rabbits, smoke follows the tenderfoot, and smoke follows beauty, but Beauty was a horse.


Cody from Honolulu, Hawaii, says that when his family was setting out on a trip, his father would declare We're off like a jug handle!


Jeanne from Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin, is perplexed by the phrase at first blush, which would seem to have to do with embarrassment. But at least as early as the mid-14th century, another meaning of blush has been "glance," so at first blush simply means "at first glance."


Daddle is an archaic term for "hand" or "fist," and tip us your daddle is an invitation to shake hands.


Summer reading recommendations! Martha loves A Velocity of Being: Letters to a Young Reader, a beautifully illustrated anthology of letters from well-known writers and others celebrating reading. The book is edited by Maria Popovic of Brainpickings and independent publisher Claudia Bedrick. Grant recommends The Dictionary Wars by Peter Martin, which chronicles the bitter rivalries among lexicographers, scholars, and publishers in Noah Webster's day. He also enjoyed the Spanish-language version of Isabel Allende's novel, The City of Beasts, an adventure story for young adults. Reading an electronic version of such a book, with the option to click on words to look up their translation, is a great way to learn a language.


Niesey from Laramie, Wyoming, is curious about the word mucky-muck, meaning "an important person," and often "someone self-important."  Usually spelled muckety-muck, or less commonly muck-a-muck, it's  associated with the Chinook jargon of the Pacific Northwest, in which hayo makamak means "plenty to eat." The longer version in English is high muckety-muck.


In Icelandic, the phrase analogous to our cherry on top of the sundae, meaning "a little something extra," translates literally as "the raisin at the end of the sausage."


John in Brattleboro, Vermont, is pondering words and phrases that change their meaning when they move from one language to another. For example, in Germany the English phrase public viewing doesn't have to do with a wake, but a live sporting event. Similarly, in English, a la mode usually describes something topped with ice cream, a specialization of the French phrase that means "according the fashion." And the Japanese imperative gambatte, from gambaru, meaning "doing one's best and persevering to the bitter end," is sometimes replaced by a word that sounds more like English, fighto!


Lexi from Denver, Colorado, says her grandfather's parting advice was always don't let nobody give you a snow job. Where'd he get that saying, and what does it mean, exactly?


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Spill the Tea (#1521)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

If someone urges you to spill the tea, they probably don't want you tipping over a hot beverage. Originally, the tea here was the letter T, as in truth. To spill the T means to pass along truthful information. Plus, some delicious Italian idioms involving food. The Italian phrase that literally translates Eat the soup or jump out the window! means Take it or leave it, and a phrase that translates as We don't fry with water around here! means We don't do things halfway! Also: why carbonated beverages go by various names, including soda, pop, and coke, depending on what part of the country you're from. Plus: fill your boots, bangorrhea, cotton to, and howdy; milkshakes, frappes, velvets, and cabinets; push-ups, press-ups and lagartijas; the Spanish origin of the word alligator, don't break my plate or saw off my bench, a takeoff quiz, FOMO after death, and much more.

6196131680_a97be54450_m_small In British English, the exercise known as push-ups in the United States goes by the name press-ups. The Spanish term is lagartijas, a lagartija being a small lizard that sometimes moves in a similar way. The English word alligator comes from the related Spanish term el lagarto, which means the lizard.


Debra, who teaches eighth graders in San Antonio, Texas, says some of them use the expression spill the tea meaning to spill the beans or share gossip. The earliest version of this phrase, which appears in print in the early 1990s, was spill the T, in which the letter T stands for truth. The phrase was popularized by the TV show RuPaul's Drag Race, and a similar use of T for truth appears in John Berendt's 1994 bestseller Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.


Jonathan, who lives in Dallas, Texas, but is originally from Prince Edward Island, Canada, where he often heard the phrase fill your boots, an injunction that means help yourself. Variants include dig in and fill your boots, eat up and fill your boots, and muck in and fill your boots.


Craig from Helena, Montana, wonders about the etymology of pop meaning a carbonated beverage. Depending on which part of the country you're from, you might also call this drink a soda or a coke.


Quiz Guy John Chaneski proffers a puzzle he calls F-Takeoffs, which involves removing the initial letter F from a word to get an entirely different word. For example, if John orders some lumberjack tools by sending some scanned, printed orders over a phone line, what two words apply?


Kyle from Euless, Texas, wonders about the phrase I don't cotton to this meaning I don't agree with this. It originated in the textile industry, where cotton is prepared to adhere to another fabric. In the same way, some agricultural terms have given rise to useful metaphors in English; the expressions tough row to hoe, aftermath, and broadcast all originated in the language of farming.


Wendy from San Diego, California, is curious about the soda fountain treat known in Rhode Island and parts of Massachusetts as a cabinet. Elsewhere it's called a milk shake, a frappe, a velvet, or a frost.


In her 1958 memoir Beloved Infidel, F. Scott Fitzgerald's lover Sheilah Graham recalls the famous author's distaste for exclamation points, likening the use of this punctuation to "laughing at your own joke." Some have proposed that a good word for the overuse of exclamation marks is bangorrhea, bang being an old printer's term for that punctuation mark, and -rrhea being a stem that comes from a Greek word meaning to flow.


Years ago, Derek from Omaha, Nebraska, adopted the greeting Howdy, but his wife says it sounds too uncultured. In a 2012 paper in the Journal of English Linguistics by Lauren Hall Lew and Nola Stephens describe Howdy as a term that is enregistered as rural and Southern -- in other words, country talk, and therefore supposedly unsophisticated.


Don't break my plate or saw off my bench just yet is a colorful way of saying I'll be back. It's somewhat like the phrase he hung up his spoon, referring to someone who has died.


The Italian phrase Non si frigge mica con l’acqua literally translates as We don't fry with water around here, and means "We don't do things halfway." Other Italian idioms involving food translate as to be like parsley (meaning that something is everywhere), like cabbage as an afternoon snack (meaning that something is out of place), eat soup or jump out the window (meaning "take it or leave it"), and don't eat the egg in the hen's body (meaning "don't count on something that's not certain").


Denise in Panama City, Florida, is trying to recall a word for the fear of not knowing what happens in the world after one dies. It's a more elevated term than FOMO, the fear of missing out. The fear of death itself is thanatophobia, from the Greek root thanatos, which also gives us euthanasia.


John says that many of the older patients in his Northeast Tennessee orthopedics clinic will refer to habitual activity as occurring of the morning or of the evening. The vastly more common versions of these phrases in the South and South Midlands of the United States are of a morning and of an evening.


The verb duffifie is defined in the Scots National Dictionary as "to lay down a bottle on its side for some time, after its contents have been poured out, that it may be completely drained of the few drops remaining in it."


Sherilyn in Indianapolis, Indiana, says when she was rambunctious as a child, her grandfather, who is of German descent, would ask if she had a hummel. In German, the word Hummel means bee, and a fidgety youngster might be asked Hast Du Hummeln im Hintern? meaning Do you have bumblebees in your behind? The German word Hintern, meaning behind, is related to the English words hind and hinterland. In Germany, such a child is also called a Zappelphilipp, from an 1845 poem about a boy who couldn't sit still.


If you have an aversion to human company and a love of solitude, you have apanthropy, from Greek words that mean away from humans.


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Kite in a Phonebooth (#1524)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

Stunt performers in movies have their own jargon for talking about their dangerous work. They refer to a stunt, for example, as a gag. Across the country in Brooklyn, the slang term brick means "cold," and dumb brick means "really cold." Plus: the East and Central African tradition that distinguishes between ancestors who remain alive in living memory, and all the rest who have receded into the vast ocean of history. In this sense, all of us are moving toward the past, not away from it. Plus, the Indiana town that was named incorrectly because of a bureaucratic mixup. The town's name? Correct. Also, a brain game with words big and little, slushburger vs. sloppy joe, go fry ice, fracas, beat the band, sensational spelling, heavier than a dead minister, and telling porkies.

28107676449_ae477923e1_m_small Sarah from Moorhead, Minnesota, emailed a story from her early days of teaching in North Dakota. While reading the lunch menu to her students, she was flabbergasted to see that the day's fare included something called slushburgers. She'd grown up calling this loose-meat sandwich a sloppy joe. Other names include tavern sandwich and spoonburger.


Kathleen from Ithaca, New York, remembers her mother saying Go fry ice! meaning Bug off! It's probably a minced oath replacing a phrase that exhorts the hearer to go do something else that starts with F. The earliest recorded use of Go fry ice was in a wildly popular 1929 serialized novel by Ruth Dewey Groves called Rich Girl Poor Girl, later published as a book. Other phrases that mean the same thing: Go fly a kite, Go fly a kite in a telephone booth, Go fry an egg, and Go fry your face. A Yiddish saying along these lines translates as Go whistle in the ocean.


The word fracas denotes a loud quarrel, but how do you pronounce it? There are several ways, depending in part on whether you speak British English or American English.


Whitney from Memphis, Tennessee, is curious about the origin of the phrase to beat the band, which describes something happening in forceful or energetic way.  Although the origins of this Americanism are murky, it may refer to a time when every public celebration or political speech started was preceded by a performance by a band. If you beat the band, you were fast enough to get there first. The beat in to beat the band also reflects the percussive emphasis supplied by English words that involve hitting or striking. A whopping good time, for example, is an especially good one.


Among academics, the word planful is used to describe someone methodical or skilled at planning. Whether this term catches on in the same way that teaching and learning are now used as count nouns remains to be seen.


Quiz Guy John Chaneski presents a puzzle with answers that are big and small. For example, if the clue is simply LADLE, what asterism with seven stars does that suggest?


Duncan from Brooklyn, New York, says his friends use dumb to mean "really" and brick to mean "cold." This use of dumb goes back at least to the 1700s, and was originally a euphemism for damn. Stupid has been used as an adverbial intensifier in the same way, as in It's stupid cold outside. Brick for "cold" is classic New York City slang.


In the world of stunt performers, wigging is the practice of a male stunt actor dressing as a woman to stand-in for a female actor. Painting down is the practice of white stunt performers darken their skin to stand in for actors of color. In the industry, a stunt is referred to as a gag. Some stunt performers argue that wigging and painting down result from unfair hiring practices.


Calisa in Wilmington, North Carolina, wonders about the origin of the term fair to middling, meaning "about average." It derives from an old system of classifying agricultural products.


A Turkish proverb that literally translates as "A fava bean doesn't get wet in their mouth," means that if you tell that person a secret, they will tell everyone else.


Sean in Asheville, North Carolina, wonders how to pronounce the nearby town of Leicester. Say it the way the locals do. It's part of a family of British place names affected by vowel reduction and haplology, the omission of a sound or syllable that is repeated within a word. These include Worcester, Gloucester, and Winchester, all of which go back to a Latin word that means "camp."


A Turkish proverb translates as "If your mouth is burned by milk, you blow before you eat yogurt," meaning that if you've had a bad experience with one thing, you'll be cautious when encountering something similar.


A small Southeast Indiana town was supposed to be named Comet, after The Great Comet of 1881. But a misunderstanding between the local postmaster and U.S. Post Office officials resulted in the town incorrectly being called Correct.


Liz from San Antonio, Texas, often sees the term going west in World War I-era literature and letters being used to refer to being killed in combat. The term go west as a euphemism for dying most likely has to do with the end of the day. J.R.R. Tolkien used the expression in the same way.


In his book African Religions and Philosophy, Kenyan-born philosopher John Samuel Mbiti describes the East and Central African concepts of sasha, those ancestors who remain alive in human memory, and zamani, the vast ocean of time into which everything is eventually absorbed. In this sense, we are all moving toward the past. Author David Eagleman suggests another way of thinking about the passage of time. He identifies three deaths: When the body ceases to function, when it is buried, and that moment in the future when one's name is spoken for the last time.


Our conversation about the reminder that little pitchers have big ears prompted Cheryl to write from Chicago that she and her friends developed punny way to say the same thing. They just warn each other by saying "Corn!"


The intentional misspelling of business names to attract attention is sometimes known as sensational spelling or divergent spelling.


Chelsea in Binghamton, New York, wonders about the phrase heavier than a dead minister, describing something ponderous.


If you're telling porkies, you're telling lies. This phrase is from British rhyming slang, where the term pork pie substitutes for lie.


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Kite in a Phonebooth (#1524)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

Stunt performers in movies have their own jargon for talking about their dangerous work. They refer to a stunt, for example, as a gag. Across the country in Brooklyn, the slang term brick means "cold," and dumb brick means "really cold." Plus: the East and Central African tradition that distinguishes between ancestors who remain alive in living memory, and all the rest who have receded into the vast ocean of history. In this sense, all of us are moving toward the past, not away from it. Plus, the Indiana town that was named incorrectly because of a bureaucratic mixup. The town's name? Correct. Also, a brain game with words big and little, slushburger vs. sloppy joe, go fry ice, fracas, beat the band, sensational spelling, heavier than a dead minister, and telling porkies.

28107676449_ae477923e1_m_small Sarah from Moorhead, Minnesota, emailed a story from her early days of teaching in North Dakota. While reading the lunch menu to her students, she was flabbergasted to see that the day's fare included something called slushburgers. She'd grown up calling this loose-meat sandwich a sloppy joe. Other names include tavern sandwich and spoonburger.


Kathleen from Ithaca, New York, remembers her mother saying Go fry ice! meaning Bug off! It's probably a minced oath replacing a phrase that exhorts the hearer to go do something else that starts with F. The earliest recorded use of Go fry ice was in a wildly popular 1929 serialized novel by Ruth Dewey Groves called Rich Girl Poor Girl, later published as a book. Other phrases that mean the same thing: Go fly a kite, Go fly a kite in a telephone booth, Go fry an egg, and Go fry your face. A Yiddish saying along these lines translates as Go whistle in the ocean.


The word fracas denotes a loud quarrel, but how do you pronounce it? There are several ways, depending in part on whether you speak British English or American English.


Whitney from Memphis, Tennessee, is curious about the origin of the phrase to beat the band, which describes something happening in forceful or energetic way.  Although the origins of this Americanism are murky, it may refer to a time when every public celebration or political speech started was preceded by a performance by a band. If you beat the band, you were fast enough to get there first. The beat in to beat the band also reflects the percussive emphasis supplied by English words that involve hitting or striking. A whopping good time, for example, is an especially good one.


Among academics, the word planful is used to describe someone methodical or skilled at planning. Whether this term catches on in the same way that teaching and learning are now used as count nouns remains to be seen.


Quiz Guy John Chaneski presents a puzzle with answers that are big and small. For example, if the clue is simply LADLE, what asterism with seven stars does that suggest?


Duncan from Brooklyn, New York, says his friends use dumb to mean "really" and brick to mean "cold." This use of dumb goes back at least to the 1700s, and was originally a euphemism for damn. Stupid has been used as an adverbial intensifier in the same way, as in It's stupid cold outside. Brick for "cold" is classic New York City slang.


In the world of stunt performers, wigging is the practice of a male stunt actor dressing as a woman to stand-in for a female actor. Painting down is the practice of white stunt performers darken their skin to stand in for actors of color. In the industry, a stunt is referred to as a gag. Some stunt performers argue that wigging and painting down result from unfair hiring practices.


Calisa in Wilmington, North Carolina, wonders about the origin of the term fair to middling, meaning "about average." It derives from an old system of classifying agricultural products.


A Turkish proverb that literally translates as "A fava bean doesn't get wet in their mouth," means that if you tell that person a secret, they will tell everyone else.


Sean in Asheville, North Carolina, wonders how to pronounce the nearby town of Leicester. Say it the way the locals do. It's part of a family of British place names affected by vowel reduction and haplology, the omission of a sound or syllable that is repeated within a word. These include Worcester, Gloucester, and Winchester, all of which go back to a Latin word that means "camp."


A Turkish proverb translates as "If your mouth is burned by milk, you blow before you eat yogurt," meaning that if you've had a bad experience with one thing, you'll be cautious when encountering something similar.


A small Southeast Indiana town was supposed to be named Comet, after The Great Comet of 1881. But a misunderstanding between the local postmaster and U.S. Post Office officials resulted in the town incorrectly being called Correct.


Liz from San Antonio, Texas, often sees the term going west in World War I-era literature and letters being used to refer to being killed in combat. The term go west as a euphemism for dying most likely has to do with the end of the day. J.R.R. Tolkien used the expression in the same way.


In his book African Religions and Philosophy, Kenyan-born philosopher John Samuel Mbiti describes the East and Central African concepts of sasha, those ancestors who remain alive in human memory, and zamani, the vast ocean of time into which everything is eventually absorbed. In this sense, we are all moving toward the past. Author David Eagleman suggests another way of thinking about the passage of time. He identifies three deaths: When the body ceases to function, when it is buried, and that moment in the future when one's name is spoken for the last time.


Our conversation about the reminder that little pitchers have big ears prompted Cheryl to write from Chicago that she and her friends developed punny way to say the same thing. They just warn each other by saying "Corn!"


The intentional misspelling of business names to attract attention is sometimes known as sensational spelling or divergent spelling.


Chelsea in Binghamton, New York, wonders about the phrase heavier than a dead minister, describing something ponderous.


If you're telling porkies, you're telling lies. This phrase is from British rhyming slang, where the term pork pie substitutes for lie.


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Kite in a Phonebooth (#1524)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

Stunt performers in movies have their own jargon for talking about their dangerous work. They refer to a stunt, for example, as a gag. Across the country in Brooklyn, the slang term brick means "cold," and dumb brick means "really cold." Plus: the East and Central African tradition that distinguishes between ancestors who remain alive in living memory, and all the rest who have receded into the vast ocean of history. In this sense, all of us are moving toward the past, not away from it. Plus, the Indiana town that was named incorrectly because of a bureaucratic mixup. The town's name? Correct. Also, a brain game with words big and little, slushburger vs. sloppy joe, go fry ice, fracas, beat the band, sensational spelling, heavier than a dead minister, and telling porkies.

28107676449_ae477923e1_m_small Sarah from Moorhead, Minnesota, emailed a story from her early days of teaching in North Dakota. While reading the lunch menu to her students, she was flabbergasted to see that the day's fare included something called slushburgers. She'd grown up calling this loose-meat sandwich a sloppy joe. Other names include tavern sandwich and spoonburger.


Kathleen from Ithaca, New York, remembers her mother saying Go fry ice! meaning Bug off! It's probably a minced oath replacing a phrase that exhorts the hearer to go do something else that starts with F. The earliest recorded use of Go fry ice was in a wildly popular 1929 serialized novel by Ruth Dewey Groves called Rich Girl Poor Girl, later published as a book. Other phrases that mean the same thing: Go fly a kite, Go fly a kite in a telephone booth, Go fry an egg, and Go fry your face. A Yiddish saying along these lines translates as Go whistle in the ocean.


The word fracas denotes a loud quarrel, but how do you pronounce it? There are several ways, depending in part on whether you speak British English or American English.


Whitney from Memphis, Tennessee, is curious about the origin of the phrase to beat the band, which describes something happening in forceful or energetic way.  Although the origins of this Americanism are murky, it may refer to a time when every public celebration or political speech started was preceded by a performance by a band. If you beat the band, you were fast enough to get there first. The beat in to beat the band also reflects the percussive emphasis supplied by English words that involve hitting or striking. A whopping good time, for example, is an especially good one.


Among academics, the word planful is used to describe someone methodical or skilled at planning. Whether this term catches on in the same way that teaching and learning are now used as count nouns remains to be seen.


Quiz Guy John Chaneski presents a puzzle with answers that are big and small. For example, if the clue is simply LADLE, what asterism with seven stars does that suggest?


Duncan from Brooklyn, New York, says his friends use dumb to mean "really" and brick to mean "cold." This use of dumb goes back at least to the 1700s, and was originally a euphemism for damn. Stupid has been used as an adverbial intensifier in the same way, as in It's stupid cold outside. Brick for "cold" is classic New York City slang.


In the world of stunt performers, wigging is the practice of a male stunt actor dressing as a woman to stand-in for a female actor. Painting down is the practice of white stunt performers darken their skin to stand in for actors of color. In the industry, a stunt is referred to as a gag. Some stunt performers argue that wigging and painting down result from unfair hiring practices.


Calisa in Wilmington, North Carolina, wonders about the origin of the term fair to middling, meaning "about average." It derives from an old system of classifying agricultural products.


A Turkish proverb that literally translates as "A fava bean doesn't get wet in their mouth," means that if you tell that person a secret, they will tell everyone else.


Sean in Asheville, North Carolina, wonders how to pronounce the nearby town of Leicester. Say it the way the locals do. It's part of a family of British place names affected by vowel reduction and haplology, the omission of a sound or syllable that is repeated within a word. These include Worcester, Gloucester, and Winchester, all of which go back to a Latin word that means "camp."


A Turkish proverb translates as "If your mouth is burned by milk, you blow before you eat yogurt," meaning that if you've had a bad experience with one thing, you'll be cautious when encountering something similar.


A small Southeast Indiana town was supposed to be named Comet, after The Great Comet of 1881. But a misunderstanding between the local postmaster and U.S. Post Office officials resulted in the town incorrectly being called Correct.


Liz from San Antonio, Texas, often sees the term going west in World War I-era literature and letters being used to refer to being killed in combat. The term go west as a euphemism for dying most likely has to do with the end of the day. J.R.R. Tolkien used the expression in the same way.


In his book African Religions and Philosophy, Kenyan-born philosopher John Samuel Mbiti describes the East and Central African concepts of sasha, those ancestors who remain alive in human memory, and zamani, the vast ocean of time into which everything is eventually absorbed. In this sense, we are all moving toward the past. Author David Eagleman suggests another way of thinking about the passage of time. He identifies three deaths: When the body ceases to function, when it is buried, and that moment in the future when one's name is spoken for the last time.


Our conversation about the reminder that little pitchers have big ears prompted Cheryl to write from Chicago that she and her friends developed punny way to say the same thing. They just warn each other by saying "Corn!"


The intentional misspelling of business names to attract attention is sometimes known as sensational spelling or divergent spelling.


Chelsea in Binghamton, New York, wonders about the phrase heavier than a dead minister, describing something ponderous.


If you're telling porkies, you're telling lies. This phrase is from British rhyming slang, where the term pork pie substitutes for lie.


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Monumental Disagreements [rebroadcast]

From BackStory with the American History Guys | 54:00

This is a country awash in monuments. They adorn traffic circles, street corners and, of course, the National Mall. In this special Memorial Day episode of BackStory, the American History Guys explore the idea of national remembrance. What or whom have Americans chosen to memorialize? And what do these choices say about us?

Mothers-memorial_small This is a country awash in monuments. They adorn traffic circles, street corners and, of course, the National Mall. We’ve memorialized everything from famous soldiers and statesmen, to big ideas or major events – and a lot in between. Yet our ambivalence towards these monuments is as old as our enthusiasm for them. Case in point: The Washington Monument. Ever wonder why there isn’t actually a image of Washington on it?

In this Memorial Day episode of BackStory , we explore the idea of national remembrance. Looking at some of our country’s most iconic monuments, the Guys ask what—and whom—Americans choose to remember, and discover how memorials often tell us more about their creators than what or whom they memorialize.

Guests Include:

  • Kirk Savage , Professor of Art and Architecture at the University of Pittsburgh on the early controversy over whether or not to build the Washington Monument on the National Mall.
  • Kristin Szakos , City Council Member in Charlottesville, Virginia, on two local monuments to famous Confederate generals.
  • Teresa Bergman , Professor of Communications and Film Studies at the University of the Pacific, on the evolving film presentations the National Park Service has used to welcome tourists at Mount Rushmore.

Death and The Digital Afterlife - October 28, 2012

From Deemable Tech | 52:41

This week's very special Halloween episode is the creepiest, grossest and scariest episode of Deemable Tech ever! If you dare, you'll hear all about zombie computers, how to send tweets and Facebook posts from beyond the grave, what to do with your digital estate, how to recover passwords from our departed relatives, how your cell phone is probably going to kill you, or at least make you really sick, new high-tech grave markers, and folks who chose to commit virtual (social media) suicide and others who plan on living forever and are using the Internet to try to make it happen. All that, and Ray tries his best Bela Lugosi impression, on this episode of Deemable Tech!

Deemable Tech, a weekly call-in and email-in show, is Newscast Compatible, produced with the NPR News Special Programming Clock.

Deemabletechlogosquare_small You probably shouldn't even listen to this week's episode; it's too much for you to handle. This week's very special Halloween episode is the creepiest, grossest and scariest episode of Deemable Tech ever! If you dare, you'll hear all about zombie computers, how to send tweets and Facebook posts from beyond the grave, what to do with your digital estate, how to recover passwords from our departed relatives, how your cell phone is probably going to kill you, or at least make you really sick, new high-tech grave markers, and folks who chose to commit virtual (social media) suicide and others who plan on living forever and are using the Internet to try to make it happen. All that, and Ray tries his best Bela Lugosi impression, on this episode of Deemable Tech!

Need tech help? Got a problem or tech question about your computer, phone or tablet? Give us a call and leave us a voice mail at 904-372-DEEM (3336), or send us an email and questions@deemable.com. We'll take the best questions and answer them on the show.

Subscribe to the show in iTunes by clicking here.
Subscribe to the show in another podcast reader or RSS feed reader by clicking here.

Links we mentioned on today's show:

Mommy Dearest: A History of American Motherhood [rebroadcast]

From BackStory with the American History Guys | Part of the BackStory with the American History Guys: Special Programming series | 54:00

Some say motherhood is the hardest job in the world; turns out, there's a lot of history to back that up. In this special Mother's Day episode, the American History Guys explore changing expectations of mothers over the centuries.

Mothers

For most of American history, women were charged with raising productive citizens, even as they lacked the status of full citizens themselves. So BackStory explores this paradox, looking to the ways that motherhood was used to enhance women’s claims to a say in society, and considering how the nature of mothering itself has changed over the centuries. What has it meant to be a “good mom” in American history?

Guests include:

  • Linda Kerber, University of Iowa, on the “founding mothers” who were tasked with instilling future generations with good republican values.
  • Ann Hulbertjournalist and author of Raising America (2011), on the early 20th Century advice that mothers not smother their children with love.
  • Nate DiMeo, writer and producer of The Memory Palace podcast, on the tragic story of Anna Jarvis, the “mother” of Mother’s Day.

Rinse and Repeat: Cleanliness in America [rebroadcast]

From BackStory with the American History Guys | 54:00

"Cleanliness is next to godliness," we say, and Americans have long associated good hygiene with moral and spiritual purity. This week on BackStory, we dig into the changing ways Americans have defined what it is to be clean.

Clean

In this episode of BackStory, we'll meet an 18th-century Pennsylvania woman who didn't immerse herself in water for 28 years, and ask how Americans like her kept clean without getting wet. We'll also hear about the campaign to clean up New York City in the mid-19th century, and question the extent to which germ theory really revolutionized sanitary practices. And we'll consider a dark chapter in the history of cleanliness, when social reformers in the early 20th-century set out to "sanitize" America's racial profile.

Guests Include:

  • Kristen Egan, Mary Baldwin College, on a 1915 novel about a very, very clean utopia.
  • Jennifer Marshall, University of Minnesota, on a 1920s marketing gimmick that helped make soap a permanent fixture in Americans’ lives.
  • Charletta Sudduth, University of Northern Iowa, on the racial valence of cleanliness in the Jim Crow South.
  • Owen Whooley, University of New Mexico, on what 19th century Americans knew - and didn't know - about the connection between filth and cholera.

Civil War 150th: Why They Fought [rebroadcast]

From BackStory with the American History Guys | 54:00

The Battle of Gettysburg took place 150 years ago this week – the bloodiest of the Civil War. Thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers were killed, joining the hundreds of thousands who laid down their lives in the course of the war. But why were so many prepared to fight in the first place? In this episode, the second in a special series on the Civil War, the American History Guys offer answers.

Gettysburgdetaillarge_small

The Battle of Gettysburg was the bloodiest of the Civil War - thousands would lose their lives in that battle, northerners and southerners, joining the hundreds of thousands who had already laid down their lives in the course of the war. But why were so many prepared to take up arms in the first place? When most southerners were not slaveholders, and most northerners were not abolitionists, how had a war infused with the question of slavery even begun? In this second part of our special series on the Civil War, the Guys and their guests examine the inner conflicts and mixed motivations of most Americans, as they contemplated war against each other.

The episode explores the concept of “union” and its power in the northern psyche, and the equally strong pull of “home” for the white southerner; how slavery factored in to each man’s decision to fight, most compellingly, for those former slaves recruited into the Union Army after the Emancipation Proclamation; and it looks to the women who soldiers often saw themselves fighting for, but who were left to fend for themselves as the war unleashed other terrors off the battlefield.

Guests include:

  • Christy Coleman, president of the American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar, in Richmond, Virginia, on the ways contemporary events shape our understanding of the Civil War. 
  • Adam Goodheart, historian and New York Times blogger, on the complicated allegiances and uncertainty of many Americans in the run-up to war, as they decided which side to stand on. 
  • Gary Gallagher, University of Virginia, on the unexpected way northerners understood “liberty and union” at the start of the Civil War. 
  • Aaron Sheehan-Dean, Louisiana State University, on the societal shifts that shaped how non-slaveholding southern whites saw the war. 
  • Catherine Clinton, of Queens University in Belfast, Northern Ireland, on the trials faced by northern and southern women on the home front.

 

The Alabama 35

From Robin Washington | 47:57

The fascinating journey of delegates from Duluth, Minn. - the scene of a horrific triple lynching in 1920 and the first city to erect a prominent memorial at the site of the crime - to the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Ala.

Duluthdelegation

In late April, nearly three dozen Twin Ports residents boarded a bus for a 1,223-mile trip to Montgomery, Ala. Their destination: The opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a moving, interactive monument detailing the systematic lynchings of African Americans in the century following the Civil War — including in Duluth in 1920.

Yet theirs was more than a sightseeing trip. The “Alabama 35,” as they called themselves along the way, included co-founders of Duluth’s Clayton Jackson McGhie Memorial, an edifice predating Montgomery’s by 15 years as the nation’s first prominent acknowledgement of a lynching at the site of the crime. The travelers also included Mike Tusken, Duluth’s police chief and the great nephew of the woman whose false accusation of rape led to the city’s horrific triple lynching — a participant who symbolizes the ultimate act of healing and reconciliation.

Traveling with them and narrating is Henry Banks, co-founder of the Duluth memorial and host of Wisconsin Public Radio’s “People of Color.” The producers are Banks and Robin Washington, whose previous acclaimed documentaries include the Civil Rights Movement history “You Don’t Have to Ride Jim Crow!” and the John Coltrane jazz special, “My Favorite Things at 50.”


From The Marshall Project:

The Legacy of a Lynching
A memorial, a pilgrimage, a reconciliation.
https://www.themarshallproject.org/2018/05/03/the-legacy-of-a-lynching

On the afternoon of June 15, 1920, Louis Dondino drove his one-ton green pickup truck back and forth along the streets of Duluth, Minnesota, shouting to onlookers to “Join the necktie party.” The night before, Irene Tusken, 19, and her boyfriend, Jimmie Sullivan, 18, both of Dondino’s working class West Duluth neighborhood, attended the one-day stand of the John Robinson Circus. There, the couple claimed, six black circus workers robbed them at gunpoint and raped Tusken. The next morning, a physician examining Tusken determined she showed no signs of assault, yet the pair stuck to their story. Police responded by apprehending several black roustabouts from the departing circus train, hauling six to the jail on Superior Street, the city’s main drag.


By nightfall, as many as one in ten of the city’s 100,000 residents had gathered in front of the jail, with police attempting a futile defense under orders not to use their guns.

The mob broke through, beating the prisoners and propping them up in a brief kangaroo court. Three — Elias Clayton, Elmer Jackson and Isaac McGhie, the last detained by police only as a witness — were dragged a block away to the corner of First Street and Second Avenue East. A rope was thrown over a lamppost. One by one, each man was lynched. The throng parted to allow a car through to illuminate the scene with its headlights for a photographer. Clayton’s body was cut down from the rope to better fit in the frame. The image was later sold on postcards.


The lynchings in Duluth — about as far north as you can go in the United States — are among more than 4,000 extrajudicial murders of African Americans tallied by the Equal Justice Initiative for its Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and Justice, which opened in Montgomery. Ala., last week. Among the thousands attending was a delegation of 35 from Duluth, making the 1,223-mile trip by bus. Similar pilgrimages hailed from around the country, but the point of debarkation for the Duluth group is unique among the country’s ghastly racist killing sites, most of them in 12 southern states: Kitty-corner from where the lamppost stood in 1920 is the Clayton Jackson McGhie Memorial, the nation’s most prominent commemoration of a lynching at the site of the crime, predating the Montgomery memorial by 15 years.


Under the gaze of those sculptured renditions of Clayton, Jackson and McGhie, friends and family have gathered to see the bus off. One man, flashing a warm smile, wears a smart business suit and a name badge identifying him as the host of the Minnesota Chiefs of Police conference, underway a few blocks away. He is Mike Tusken, Duluth’s current chief of police. He is also the great-nephew of Irene Tusken, the accuser of the lynched men.


“This has been a journey for me, being that I didn’t find out for years my family’s history,” he says. He first learned about his great-aunt’s role in the incident during the construction of the memorial in 2003. It now has “a soft spot in my heart,” he says, and the new national memorial also tugs on him. The police conference would oblige him to forego the bus, but he would fly south the next day.


“I can’t miss this,” he says.” It’s too big for our nation, too big for our city.”


Those making the bus pilgrimage include others inextricably tied to the memorial. With a clipboard checking everyone in is Heidi Bakk-Hansen, who in 2000 as a novice writer for a short-lived alternative newspaper wrote the definitive article, “Duluth’s Lingering Shame: Clayton, Jackson, McGhie Lynching.” The piece revealed the details behind Duluth’s most infamous day, most notably naming names that had been hushed for decades. The article sparked the interest of Henry Banks, a store owner turned activist, who organized a committee for a memorial and brought it to fruition. Banks is also on the trip. The other travelers are black and white, seniors and teens not yet born when the memorial was first envisioned.


They depart, the itinerary including civil rights shrines in Memphis and Birmingham. But before those cities there is a stop in Cairo, Ill. — or what’s left of it. At least three-quarters of the city’s structures are vacant, attributed by some to an unsettled racial history that included a 1909 lynching for which there is no commemoration of any sort. Standing under a lamppost, Bakk-Hansen rectifies that omission, reading aloud from an account of the killing of Will “Froggie” James, carried out by the white women of the town.


In Montgomery, the National Memorial for Peace and Justice (a gentler, more forward-looking name than “National Lynching Memorial,” which people tend to call it nonetheless) is more than a single edifice; the total complex includes sculpture gardens, a contemplative memorial square, and a massive structure with rusted steel monoliths engraved with names hanging from the ceiling.


A duplicate set is displayed in an outdoor area, waiting to be claimed at some future date by the communities where the tragedies occurred. On each are the names, dates of death, and county and state where a black person was lynched, sometimes several on a single day.


Duluth’s three names “are like a drop in the bucket,” says Carl Crawford, the city’s human rights officer.


At least Duluth knows the names of its martyrs. Hundred of the victims memorialized in Montgomery are documented simply as “Unknown.”“St. Clair, Illinois,” reads Crawford. “There’s about 25 names. All unknown. All on the same day.”


The main structure is a Mies van der Rohe-influenced square, in which visitors make their way around three 90-degree turns. At each turn, more of the steel markers come into view, until the scale of the atrocities becomes overwhelming. Many visitors break down and cry. A wall of plaques on the left presents the ostensible reasons for the killings. Crawford reads aloud:


“‘David Hunter was lynched in Lawrence County, South Carolina, in 1898, for leaving a farm where he worked without permission. Calvin Kimblern was lynched by a mob of people in Pueblo, Colorado’ — more evidence that this just wasn’t a Southern thing. This was an American thing. ‘Robert Morton was lynched in Rockfield, Kentucky in 1897, for writing a note to a white woman.’”


In the Legacy Museum itself, the exhibits put lynching in context as part of a systematic campaign to keep African Americans subjugated and powerless after emancipation, drawing a straight line from slavery to lynching to present-day mass incarceration of black people. Visitors may not make it that far, however. Many burst into tears at the museum’s first exhibit: haunting holographs of enslaved mothers asking you if you know where their children were sold.


The Duluth delegation is joined by an honorary member: Warren Read of the Seattle area, who was doing a genealogical search when he stumbled across the article by Bakk-Hansen. There he found the name of his great-grandfather: Louis Dondino, the man who organized the lynch mob. He kept searching, and tracked down the family of Elmer Jackson. He reached out to a cousin of the murdered man, Virginia Huston, from Jackson’s hometown of Pennytown, Missouri, and the two have met up to visit the memorial and museum together.


At an impromptu gathering with the Duluth group outside the Legacy Museum, Huston, now in her seventies, introduces Read, 51, to those new to the story.


“Warren is my baby brother now,” she says. “He brought the research to us to let us know what happened. We didn’t know what happened to Elmer, but with his research, we now know. We have closure.”


“Warren’s great-grandfather, he was instrumental in getting the lynch mob,” she recalls. “But that’s not Warren. He shouldn’t have any guilt feelings or anything. We’re going to look forward, we’re not looking back. We’re going to build ourselves up, and live for today and live for tomorrow. He will always be my brother and I love him very much.”


Shocked as he was to discover this horror in his family’s history, Read says living with his family’s past is easier for him than others. He lives 1,500 miles away from the scene of the crime and few would know the story if he didn’t volunteer it.


“I tell people we bear a certain responsibility to right the wrongs that our forefathers did,” he says. “But I also understand that I don’t live in Duluth, my last name’s not Dondino, so I have certain amount of safety and distance and emotional distance from it.”


Mike Tusken doesn’t have that luxury. The police chief lives in Duluth and carries the family name of the false accuser. And his chosen profession, in which he has risen through the ranks from an officer working a beat, has put him in contact with many who might suspect his attitude toward African Americans reflects the animus of his forebears.


“I wonder if people in the community, especially the African-American community, if I show up at a call, are they thinking, ‘Oh yeah, I know what you're all about.’ Do they think I got to the top of the Police Department because, ‘He’s that racist'?” he said in a 2010 column in the Duluth News Tribune, which first identified his family connection to the accuser.


The edifice at First Street and Second Avenue East has become a place of solace, he says. And now, like thousands of others, Tusken has found another one, and like other somber visitors, rounds its right angles, becoming helplessly overwhelmed by the magnitude of the senseless carnage.


But it isn’t enough to grieve, he says.


“Leaving this memorial, I think everyone has to ask themselves, ‘What are you personally going to do to confront racism? To make sure that people have access and equality?’ And that really is the takeaway everyone should leave with: What are you going to do?”


Robin Washington is a regular contributor to The Marshall Project. His wife, Julia Cheng, is a past co-chair of the committee that maintains the memorial to the Duluth lynching victims and holds programs in their memory. Washington can be reached at robin@robinwashington.com or via Twitter @robinbirk


“An Outrage: Reflections on Racism, Past & Present.” (hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 54:03

-“An Outrage’ is a documentary film about lynching in the American South. From the end of the Civil War well into the middle of the twentieth century, lynching claimed the lives of at least 3,959 African American men, women and children.
-Ernest Gaines' many novels, including "A Lesson Before Dying" and "The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman" launched America's interest in exploring African American history.
-Reflections by Charlottesville residents recorded at the “Dialogues on Race and Inequity’ at the University of Virginia.
-The Columbia Journalism Review convened a panel of journalists for “Race, Racism, and the News” in Charlottesville. We feature an excerpt from that discussion, which includes freelance reporter Jordy Yager and Slate chief political correspondent Jamelle Bouie.

-And more…

15775540288_4c8e54dbef_b-1004x618_small "An Outrage" is a documentary film about lynching in the American South, directed by Hannah Ayers and Lance Warren. From the end of the Civil War well into the middle of the twentieth century, lynching claimed the lives of at least 3,959 African American men, women and children. Also: Renowned author Ernest Gaines is a descendant of slaves who was raised in on a former Louisiana plantation. Keith Clark says Gaines' many novels, including "A Lesson Before Dying" and "The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman", launched America's interest in exploring African American history. Plus: We share a series of reflections by Charlottesville residents recorded at the 'Dialogues on Race and Inequity' at the University of Virginia. 

Later on: For many Americans, August 12th marked a shift in the national conversation about white supremacy and racism. For the people who were injured in the Charlottesville attack that killed Heather Heyer, the 12th marks day one of a long process of recovery. We share the story of Lisa, who was injured that day. And: The Columbia Journalism Review convened a panel of journalists for "Race, Racism, and the News" in Charlottesville. We feature an excerpt from that discussion, which includes freelance reporter Jordy Yager and Slate chief political correspondent Jamelle Bouie. 

An Outrage: Reflections on Racism (hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:57

A new documentary sheds light on the ugly history of lynching - The work of author Ernest Gaines - Reflections from Charlottesville residents on the events of August 12 - The story of a victim of terror in Charlottesville - A panel discussion on racism and the media

15775540288_4c8e54dbef_b_small

“An Outrage” is a documentary film about lynching in the American South, directed by Hannah Ayers and Lance Warren.Beginning with the end of the Civil War, and well into the middle of the twentieth century, the extralegal and socially sanctioned practice of lynching claimed the lives of at least 3,959 African American men, women and children. Also: Renowned author Ernest Gaines is a descendant of slaves who was raised in on a former Louisiana plantation. Keith Clark says Gaines many novels, including A Lesson Before Dying and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, launched America’s interest in exploring African American history. Plus:We share a series of reflections by Charlottesville residents recorded at the Dialogues on Race and Inequity at the University of Virginia.

Later on: For many Americans, August 12th marks a shift in the national conversation about white supremacy and racism. For the people who were injured in the Charlottesville attack that killed Heather Heyer, the 12th marks day one of a long process of recovery. We share the story of one person who was injured that day. And: The Columbia Journalism Review recently convened a panel of journalists for “Race, Racism, and the News” in Charlottesville. We feature an excerpt from the discussion that includes local freelance reporter Jordy Yader, the New York Times' Jenna Wortham, and Slate chief political correspondent Jamelle Bouie.

An Outrage: Reflections on Racism (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

A new documentary sheds light on the ugly history of lynching - The work of author Ernest Gaines - Reflections from Charlottesville residents on the events of August 12

15775540288_4c8e54dbef_b_small “An Outrage” is a documentary film about lynching in the American South, directed by Hannah Ayers and Lance Warren. Beginning with the end of the Civil War, and well into the middle of the twentieth century, the extralegal and socially sanctioned practice of lynching claimed the lives of at least 3,959 African American men, women and children. Also: Renowned author Ernest Gaines is a descendant of slaves who was raised in on a former Louisiana plantation. Keith Clark says Gaines many novels, including A Lesson Before Dying and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, launched America’s interest in exploring African American history. Plus:We share a series of reflections by Charlottesville residents recorded at the Dialogues on Race and Inequity at the University of Virginia.

AN OUTRAGE: REFLECTIONS ON RACISM, PAST & PRESENT (HALF)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 28:58

-“An Outrage’ is a documentary film about lynching in the American South. From the end of the Civil War well into the middle of the twentieth century, lynching claimed the lives of at least 3,959 African American men, women and children.
-Ernest Gaines' many novels, including "A Lesson Before Dying" and "The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman" launched America's interest in exploring African American history.
-Reflections by Charlottesville residents recorded at the “Dialogues on Race and Inequity’ at the University of Virginia.

15775540288_4c8e54dbef_b-1004x618_small "An Outrage" is a documentary film about lynching in the American South, directed by Hannah Ayers and Lance Warren. From the end of the Civil War well into the middle of the twentieth century, lynching claimed the lives of at least 3,959 African American men, women and children. Also: Renowned author Ernest Gaines is a descendant of slaves who was raised in on a former Louisiana plantation. Keith Clark says Gaines' many novels, including "A Lesson Before Dying" and "The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman", launched America's interest in exploring African American history. Plus: We share a series of reflections by Charlottesville residents recorded at the 'Dialogues on Race and Inequity' at the University of Virginia. 

The Civil War Off The Battlefield (half hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 28:59

Little-known stories about the ships, soldiers, and animals that transformed the United States during the Civil War.

1200px-monitor_officers2-1024x568_small Little-known stories about the ships, soldiers, and animals that transformed the United States during the Civil War.

Voices of Vietnam: Women of War (hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the WGR Special Series series | 53:58

-Alongside the army of men on the front lines of conflict was an army of women in support roles. From the Red Cross volunteers who boosted morale to the nurses who treated injuries, women were a major part of soldiers experience of the war.
-The stories of some of these women, and connect with scholars on how women’s roles in Vietnam reflected the gender norms of the era.
-Also the stories of war wives who allied with anti-war activists to bring about the return of POWs.

Wives_small Alongside the army of men on the front lines of conflict was an army of women in support roles. From the Red Cross volunteers who boosted morale to the nurses who treated injuries, women were a major part of soldiers experience of the war. We hear the stories of some of these women, and connect with scholars on how women's roles in Vietnam reflected the gender norms of the era. 
Later in the Show: The war upended the lives of millions of women at home, some of whom turned to activism in an effort to bring their husbands home. We tell the stories of war wives who allied with anti-war activists to bring about the return of POWs.
 

Voices of Vietnam: A Lost Homeland (hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the WGR Special Series series | 53:56

-The Fall of Saigon marked the bitter end of the American War in Vietnam and the loss of a homeland for hundreds of thousands of Vietnamese people. We share stories of the chaotic withdrawal of U.S. troops, along with heroic rescues and harrowing escapes of Vietnamese citizens.

-Some of the Vietnam War’s most enduring legacies are the Vietnamese communities of America, made up of refugees who arrived en masse after the Fall of Saigon. In our final episode, we explore how these communities became a key to economic success for refugees, and how many still grappled with the complexities of gratitude, guilt, and silence

Vietnamese_refugees_on_us_carrier_operation_frequent_wind-407x250_small The Fall of Saigon marked the bitter end of the American War in Vietnam and the loss of a homeland for hundreds of thousands of Vietnamese people. We share stories of the chaotic withdrawal of U.S. troops, along with heroic rescues and harrowing escapes of Vietnamese citizens. Then we take a glimpse into post-war life under communist rule in Vietnam.

Later in the show: Some of the Vietnam War’s most enduring legacies are the Vietnamese communities of America, made up of refugees who arrived en masse after the Fall of Saigon. In our final episode, we explore how these communities became a key to economic success for refugees, and how many still grappled with the complexities of gratitude, guilt, and silence. Members of the next generation share the delicate balance of growing up as both Vietnamese and American, and discuss immigration in the U.S. today.

Diary of A Bad Year: A War Correspondent's Dilemma

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 58:19

NPR's Kelly McEvers' unprecedented and intimate portrait of the sacrifices reporters and their families make to tell untold stories -- and the sometimes dangerous allure of the job.

Independently produced with Jay Allison.

Kelly_with_tanks_small

In early 2011, NPR's Kelly McEvers started to see things in slow motion. She cried unpredictably. She was a correspondent in the turbulent Middle East, in the time of the Arab uprisings. Colleagues and friends were being kidnapped. Some were getting killed. 

But still, she went toward the story. The next year, 2012, was the deadliest year on record for journalists. It was a huge hit to the "tribe" of war correspondents of which Kelly is a part. These are people who choose to go into conflict, to put themselves at risk. But they also enjoy the role, the adrenaline, the life. Some of them, like Kelly, have children. 

As she reported in dangerous places like Bahrain, Yemen, and Syria, she braved gunfire, explosions, and tear gas, recording diaries the whole time. She also turned her reporting skills on her own life, seeking advice from doctors, scientists, and colleagues. Her goal was to answer one question: Why do otherwise intelligent people risk their lives when they don't have to? 

Twenty months later, in collaboration with independent producer Jay Allison of Transom.org, the result is a documentary radio hour called "Diary of a Bad Year: A War Correspondent's Dilemma."  

The program includes interviews with  British journalist Anna Blundy, whose father, the late war correspondent David Blundy, was killed by a sniper while covering the Salvadoran Civil War; BBC World Affairs correspondent, Paul Wood; Jon Lee Anderson international investigative reporter for The New Yorker; international journalist, Christiane Amanpour, for CNN/ABC; and Sebastian Junger, who with the late Tim Hetherington made the award-winning film, Restrepo, about the war in Afghanistan. 

It's a gripping story, an unprecedented and intimate portrait of the sacrifices reporters and their families make to tell untold stories -- and the sometimes dangerous allure of the job. 

It premieres on the public radio website, Transom.org, on June 25th, and is available to public radio stations through NPR and PRX.  

Produced by:

Kelly McEvers
 is a Middle East correspondent for National Public Radio based in Beirut, Lebanon, mainly covering the conflict in Syria. In 2012 she was awarded the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia award, the Peabody Award, the Gracie Award and an Overseas Press Club citation.

Jay Allison is variously the founder, collaborator, and producer of The Moth Radio Hour, This I Believe, Lost & Found SoundTransom.orgPRX.org, and WCAI on Cape Cod where he lives. He has created hundreds of documentaries and has received six Peabody Awards.

Transom.org  channels new work and voices to public radio, with a focus on the power of story, and on the mission of public media in a changing media environment. Transom won the first Peabody Award ever granted exclusively to a website. Transom.org is a project of Atlantic Public Media which runs the Transom Story Workshops and founded WCAI, the public radio station in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

 

 

               


                           Support for this work comes from the National Endowment for the Arts

                                                             

A Life Sentence: Victims, Offenders, Justice, and My Mother

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 58:00

This is a story about a terrible crime and everything that followed. It’s an intensely personal documentary, but it extends into public life and into the heart of our political and correctional systems.

Some stories take a long time. This one is an hour long and took two and a half years to produce, after twenty years of living with it.

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In the opening of this documentary, Samantha Broun says:

In 1994, my mother was the victim of a violent crime. She was 55 years old and living alone in Nyack, New York.  On the evening of September 21st a stranger came into her backyard. The stranger attacked her from behind. Five hours later, he left her lying on her bed. Hands and feet bound with tape. Alive. She survived.  

I suppose I could start this story with how the system failed. Or with McFadden’s family in Philadelphia. I could start with the thousands of prisoners whose hopes for a second chance were obliterated because of what McFadden did in 1994. Or I could tell you about the political careers both launched and destroyed. But instead I think I’ll save those parts and start where I usually start which is with my mother.

Produced for Transom.org  

 


Transom.org
  channels new work and voices to public radio, with a focus on the power of story, and on the mission of public media in a changing media environment. Transom won the first Peabody Award ever granted exclusively to a website. Transom.org is a project of Atlantic Public Media which runs the Transom Story Workshops and founded WCAI, the public radio station in Woods Hole, Mass.



Support for this work comes from National Endowment for the Arts 
 

 

National Endowment for the Arts


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We've Never Been The Same: A War Story

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 53:28

We've Never Been The Same: A War Story is the story of one night of battle and the decades of recovery that followed. Produced by Adam Piore and Jay Allison.

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All wars are the same, it is said; only the scenery changes. And the repercussions are pretty much the same too.

Over the course of five years, Adam Piore gathered the stories of the surviving members of Delta Company, a Vietnam-era paratrooper unit; Jay Allison joined him for the last two years when it turned from a book into a radio story. We’re proud now to feature the finished hour on Transom and here at PRX.

At Fort Campbell before deployment, Delta was a ragtag bunch, the “leftovers” as one of their fellow soldiers put it, but on the night of March 18th, 1968, they became heroes. Their leader received the Medal of Honor and two others were awarded the nation’s second highest honor, the Distinguished Service Cross, for their valor that night when the company endured a long and devastating battle—not as long or as devastating, however, as the years that followed, after the men of Delta Company came home separately to live alone with the memories.

Adam Piore became dedicated to this group of guys and to their common story of trauma, guilt, courage, heartbreak, and reunion. This is Adam’s first work for radio and his notes about the transition from print are at Transom. You’re invited to come talk with him about his process or the finished work and to see archival photos.



Produced by:

Adam Piore has spent the last two decades writing for newspapers and magazines, covering everything from the U.S. Congress to the aftermath of genocide to the War in Iraq. You can read some of his recent work at adampiore.com.

Jay Allison is variously the founder, collaborator, and producer of The Moth Radio Hour, This I Believe, Lost & Found SoundTransom.orgPRX.org, and WCAI on Cape Cod where he lives. He has created hundreds of documentaries and has received six Peabody Awards. More at jayallison.com


Transom.org  channels new work and voices to public radio, with a focus on the power of story, and on the mission of public media in a changing media environment. Transom won the first Peabody Award ever granted exclusively to a website. Transom.org is a project of Atlantic Public Media which runs the Transom Story Workshops and founded WCAI, the public radio station in Woods Hole, Mass.

Support for this work comes from National Endowment for the Arts 
 
National Endowment for the Arts    

Inside the Adoption Circle

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 54:01

First-person voices from all sides of adoption. Stories about living with questions and searching for answers.

Landry200_2_small We hear from birth families (mothers, siblings and a father), adoptees (both kids and adults), and various adoptive families including open adoption and international adoption (China).

Anatomy of a Code Blue

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 28:30

A remarkable half-hour of insights into a hospital’s most traumatic and intimate moments. A Transom Radio Special produced by Sam Slavin with Viki Merrick

Codeblue_prx_small

You’ve seen it on TV. The line on the heart monitor goes flat. Reassuring beeps are overtaken by the ominous, solid tone of death. Doctors come running, throw electric paddles on the chest and yell, “Clear!” The patient springs back to life — most of the time, at least on TV.

Yet a “code blue” can also be traumatic. A large nurse throws his entire weight onto the chest of a frail ninety-year old, cracking multiple ribs. A doctor tears off the patient’s gown. Each chest compression launches blood from the patient’s mouth showering his naked body. Drugs upon drugs squeeze blood to vital organs, but when his heart starts again most of his brain may have already died from lack of oxygen.

The producer, Sam Slavin,  a third year student at Harvard Medical School explores the world inside a “Code Blue,” by interviewing everyone affected when a Code is called—from doctors to maintenance workers.  He gathered 28 hours of tape with 30 different interview subjects, and this piece combines all the recollections he was given.

This is the first piece produced by Sam Slavin and featured on Transom.org

Transom.org  channels new work and voices to public radio, with a focus on the power of story, and on the mission of public media in a changing media environment. Transom won the first Peabody Award ever granted exclusively to a website. Transom.org is a project of Atlantic Public Media which runs the Transom Story Workshops and founded WCAI, the public radio station in Woods Hole, Mass.

Support for this work comes from National Endowment for the Arts 
 
National Endowment for the Arts

A Christmas Gift For You

From Joyride Media | Part of the Holiday Programming Extravaganzas series | 59:00

The original rock and roll Christmas album returns.

Xmasgift_small The inside story behind this 1963 album featuring performances by The Ronettes, The Crystals, Darlene Love and Bob B. Soxx and the Blue Jeans that raised the bar for pop/rock arrangements of classic holiday songs.  The All Music Guide says,  “This is the Christmas album by which all later holiday releases had to be judged,” and Rolling Stone lists it as one of the best albums ever made.  Includes interviews with singers Darlene Love and LaLa Brooks, musicians Nino Tempo, Don Randi and Hal Blaine.  Hosted by Anthony DeCurtis.  

Route 66

From The Kitchen Sisters | 57:54

A two-part audio documentary about Route 66

Route66poster_small In 1984 there were no Route 66 associations, historic signs, fun runs or anything else to promote or identify the road. Only fading landmarks with names like 66 Motel or 66 Diner stood as sentinels of an era gone by. Such is the perspective of this audio documentary. Songwriter Bobby Troup tells the story of his 1946 hit, "Get Your Kicks on Route 66." Also Gladys Cutberth, know as "Mrs. 66," and other members of the old "66 Association" talk about the early years of the road. And Mickey Mantle explains, "If it hadn't been for U.S. 66 I wouldn't have been a Yankee." These people and others tell about the beginnings of the highway and the making of a legend.

Imagining Yoko Ono (Hour Long Version)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:59

Yoko Ono is best known for her marriage to John Lennon and for her perceived role in the breakup of the Beatles. But she was an accomplished and innovative artist long before she even met Lennon. (And more...)

Dmp_yokoono_small Yoko Ono is best known for her marriage to John Lennon and for her perceived role in the breakup of the Beatles. But she was an accomplished and innovative artist long before she even met Lennon. Plus: A novel by Fred D'Aguiar tells the story of a mother and daughter caught up in the tragic Jonestown mass suicide of 1978.

Later in the show: Americans have been getting their kicks from Route 66 since John Steinbeck labeled it “The Mother Road” in The Grapes of Wrath. Michael Lund is fascinated by the nostalgic small town life found along “America’s Main Street.” Lund is the author of a series of Route 66 novels. And: Jack Kerouac wrote about his travels along Route 66 in On the Road, the novel that made him a literary success. Gordon Ball says Kerouac’s novel about the Beat Generation is as relevant today as it was in the 1950s.

Watching History (Hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:56

On the eve of WWI, one man had a front seat to history. A new documentary tells his incredible story.

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On the eve of WWI, Antoine Köpe had a front seat to history. A century later, Antoine’s elaborate journals, cartoons, recordings, and collections reveal what it was like in the last days of the Ottoman Empire. Filmmaker Nefin Dinç (James Madison University) is collecting Antoine’s memories into a new documentary. And: Native-Uruguayan Gabriela Toletti (Tidewater Community College and Old Dominion University) says that even after decades of living in the United States, she feels like she has a foot in both worlds. She finds comfort and insight in the works of Uruguayan playwright Dino Armas, who writes about the difficulties of migration.

Later in the show: Ann Marie Stock (William and Mary) has opened her heart to Cuban film and her home to Cuban filmmakers. She travels regularly to Cuba and discusses how Cuban film changed in the early 21st century. Plus: In Mexico, theaters are more than just a place for entertainment. Jacqueline Bixler (Virginia Tech) says they are a forum for working out the traumatic events that have shaped Mexican history. Bixler was named Virginia Outstanding Faculty of 2016.


Immigration Stories (hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:55

-Immigrants to the United States share their personal stories of how they journeyed from Central and South America, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the former Soviet Republics. David Bearinger introduces excerpts from the filmed interviews and discusses the complexity of the immigrant and refugee experience for the individuals and families who have lived and are living it.
-The contributions that Irish nuns made to help destitute immigrant Catholic children in New York City were instrumental in developing modern American social institutions like foster care and welfare. Before the nuns aided these children, they were being sent to live with Protestant families, often never seeing their parents again.
-The history and experience of guest workers in the United States to other countries.

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An exhibit called New Virginians: 1619-2019 & Beyond features oral histories and photographs recorded by Pat Jarrett.  People share their personal stories of how they journeyed from Central and South America, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the former Soviet Republics to make Virginia their new home. David Bearinger  introduces excerpts from the interviews and discusses the complexity of the immigrant and refugee experience for the individuals and families who have lived and are living it.
Later in the show: The contributions that Irish nuns made to help destitute immigrant Catholic children in New York City were instrumental in developing modern American social institutions like foster care and welfare. Before the nuns aided these children, they were being sent to live with Protestant families, often never seeing their parents again. Maureen Fitzgerald speaks about what lessons can be learnt from the Irish immigrant experience. Also: Cindy Hahamovitch compares the history and experience of guest workers in the United States to other countries.

 

Slavery: The Rise of American Capitalism (Hour Long Version)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:54

The tribulations of Solomon Northup, a free black man from upstate New York, are depicted in the popular film 12 Years a Slave. A soon to be published book documents how the business of slavery gave rise to American capitalism.

Timothy_h

The tribulations of Solomon Northup, a free black man from upstate New York, are depicted in the popular film 12 Years a Slave. In a soon to be published book, Calvin Schermerhorn (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities Fellow) documents how the business of slavery gave rise to American capitalism. Also featured: With Good Reason producer Kelley Libby checks in on a log cabin-building workshop on the grounds of Montpelier, the former home of President James Madison. The cabin is a replica of a dwelling that once housed enslaved people on Madison’s plantation. Later in the show: The contributions that Irish nuns made to help destitute immigrant Catholic children in New York City were instrumental in developing modern American social institutions like foster care and welfare. Maureen Fitzgerald (College of William and Mary) says before the nuns aided these children, they were being sent to live with Protestant families outside NYC, often never seeing their parents again. Also: Cindy Hahamovitch (College of William and Mary) compares the history and experience of guest workers in the United States to other countries. - See more at: http://withgoodreasonradio.org/2014/03/slavery-the-rise-of-american-capitalism/#sthash.TEyGSS7v.dpuf
The tribulations of Solomon Northup, a free black man from upstate New York, are depicted in the popular film 12 Years a Slave. In a soon to be published book, Calvin Schermerhorn (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities Fellow) documents how the business of slavery gave rise to American capitalism. Also featured: With Good Reason producer Kelley Libby checks in on a log cabin-building workshop on the grounds of Montpelier, the former home of President James Madison. The cabin is a replica of a dwelling that once housed enslaved people on Madison’s plantation. Later in the show: The contributions that Irish nuns made to help destitute immigrant Catholic children in New York City were instrumental in developing modern American social institutions like foster care and welfare. Maureen Fitzgerald (College of William and Mary) says before the nuns aided these children, they were being sent to live with Protestant families outside NYC, often never seeing their parents again. Also: Cindy Hahamovitch (College of William and Mary) compares the history and experience of guest workers in the United States to other countries. - See more at: http://withgoodreasonradio.org/2014/03/slavery-the-rise-of-american-capitalism/#sthash.TEyGSS7v.dpuf

A Small Southern Town: The Nation's Capital In Slave Times

From Richard Paul | 54:10

Dramatization - largest mass-escape of slaves in Amer history - PROMOS ATTACHED

Smallsouthern_small Hear the first person accounts of people who lived in slavery; the voices of those who worked to end slavery and those who strove to keep it in "A Small Southern Town: The Nation's Capital In Slave Times." In this special designed for African American History Month, listeners will hear of one family's role in one of the largest mass escapes of slaves in American history. "A Small Southern Town" combines dramatic readings of first person accounts from slave times with modern day analysis to shed light on little known aspects of slave life and slave times in the Nation's Capital. ----------------------------------------- Richard Paul offers these suggestions for reading on subjects covered in his two-part program on slavery: * Arguing About Slavery, by William Lee Miller. Published by Alfred A. Knopf, c. 1996. Available at bookstores. * Personal Memoir of Daniel Drayton: For Four Years and Four Months A Prisoner (For Chairty's Sake) In Washington Jail including A Narrative Of the Voyage and Capture Of The Schooner Pearl. Published by Negro Universities Press, c. 1855. Available at the DC Historical Society. * Fugitives of the Pearl, by John Paynter. Published by Associated Publishers, Inc., Washington, DC, c. 1930. Available at the DC Historical Society. * The Life of Josiah Henson, Formally a Slave, Now an Inhabitant of Canada, by Josiah Henson, c. 1849. Available at the Montgomery County Historical Society. Newspaper Articles * "Uncle Tom's Montgomery County Cabin" by Michael Richman, The Washington Post, Wednesday December 10, 1997; Horizon section; Pg. H05 * "Escape on the Pearl: Years Before the Civil War, 77 Washington Slaves Made a Risky Bid for Freedom" by Mary Kay Ricks, The Washington Post, Wednesday August 12, 1998; Horizon section; pg. H01

Solidarity And Revolt Aboard The Slave Ship Creole

From WWNO | Part of the TriPod: New Orleans At 300 series | 10:23

In this episode of TriPod, Laine Kaplan-Levenson discusses the slave revolt on the Brig Creole with Harvard Professor Walter Johnson.

Brig_creole_small

A “brig” is a two-masted ship, a big ship. And “brig” is the word used for a prison on a ship. And the Brig Creole is an 1800s ship that was meant to deliver 135 enslaved people to New Orleans. "Meant" being the key word here…

The ship left Virginia on October 30, 1841, with plans to take the same route that dozens of ships took to the port of New Orleans.

Walter Johnson, History Professor at Harvard University, says as of 1841, nothing could have been more ordinary than this journey. This was the height of the domestic slave trade in the United States.

“The bulk of the enslaved people who form the labor force in the emerging cotton kingdom are taken from the upper south, as one of the largest forced migrations in human history,” Johnson says.

Ships brought thousands of people into the New Orleans slave market. But those on board the Creole were determined to make moves and not land in the cotton kingdom.

Britain outlawed the international slave trade with the Slave Trade Act of 1807, and its ships take the lead in policing the high seas, searching ships of other nations. They sign bilateral treaties with Atlantic trading nations like Portugal, Sweden, France and others. But there’s one country that responds to this with "aw, hell no": America.

"So a British naval crew trying to interdict slave shipments is not allowed to stop a ship that has the American flag”, says Johnson. “What that means, in the words of the historian WEB DuBois, is that through the first half of the 19th century, Old Glory became the slave trader’s flag of choice.”

Other countries became hip to what the U.S. flag meant at sea, and started switching flags.

“So say you're a Spanish slave trader and you see a British naval ship on the horizon. The first thing the slave traders do is they run up the American flag, because that way they are protected by the mantle of American national sovereignty.”

So the U.S. was notoriously defiant, and we knew it. But back to 1841 and the Brig Creole, sailing the Atlantic under that flag, and everything it represented. A week into the journey, on the night of November 7, William Merritt, one of the slave traders aboard the Creole, goes down into the hold.

“He sees Madison Washington, who is one of the slave men” Johnson says. “He’s out of the hold where he's supposed to be. There's a confrontation, and the slave trader escapes from Washington's grasp and runs back on to the deck of the ship. He hears a shot fired and realizes that some of the slaves in the ship are in revolt, and within four or five hours the slaves have complete control of the ship.”

One slave trader is killed and thrown overboard, and captain Robert Ensor is wounded. Nineteen slaves are later identified as the rebels responsible for the revolt. They had heard of a ship that had departed from Virginia the year before, and shipwrecked in the Bahamas. That was British territory -- no slave trade allowed -- and those shipwrecked slaves were eventually emancipated by the local British government.

It was with that story in mind that the rebels took command of the Brig Creole, and re-routed it to Nassau, Bahamas.

The ship sails into the port in the Bahamas, and at that point, the 19 rebels kind of step down from power to mix in with the rest of the slaves. This is in hopes of not being targeted as criminals, but Johnson says what it also does is allow the white crew to reassert control and let Old Glory do the talking. “By raising the American flag is to say to the British ‘you have no interest in this. Just give us back the cargo and we'll push on to New Orleans.’”

Not so fast, say the British, who come on board to investigate what happened. They’re told by the Brig Creole crew that a group of slaves rebelled and briefly took control, which is why they’re docked in Nassau. But the Brits respond by saying, "Hey, USA, you can’t claim that a slave revolt has occurred. Not here, anyway."

“Because if there's no such thing as slavery in the British Empire,” says Johnson, “then there cannot be a slave revolt.”

The white crew just wants to keep the slaves on board, get back out to sea, and go make their profit in New Orleans. But Johnson points out that the community of Nassau at that time is mainly African. It’s full of emancipated slaves, and the West Indian regiment of Britain’s army. They realize what’s going on relates to them to the extent that many of them get into small boats with clubs and go out and position themselves around the Creole in order to protect it from any effort by the white crew to take it away and sail it back to New Orleans.

When the Americans realized need to regain control in the harbor, they tried to buy more weapons on shore, and no one in Nassau would sell them weapons. Johnson says there's this revolutionary Black Atlantic, there's the symbol of the American flag moving through the water saying "Don't mess with us, don't touch us," there's the British who have abandoned this ideology of slavery. And then all three of those forces just comes to a head at Nassau. “It’s pretty amazing what they did, right? So there's a story of the establishment of political solidarity under extreme conditions here.”

Political solidarity on many levels. As Johnson describes, the community in Nassau surrounds the docked Brig Creole in smaller boats to say "you guys aren’t going anywhere with those slaves -- they’re not yours anymore."’ The local government defends the community’s actions, and lends further support with their army! And the whole town boycotts American business by refusing to sell them weapons. Johnson says that it’s important to remember that before all this, was the plan to take over the ship in the first place.

“I mean these are 19 people who are from different areas of Virginia who have not known one another before they met in the slave pen and then on the slave ship in Virginia. At the end of October. And within a week, they come to trust one another and off to risk their lives on this venture. That's incredible.”

This is not something the white crew was expecting. Otherwise the ship’s captain, Robert Ensor, would have never brought his family along. In an article Johnson wrote about the incident, he writes:

For what else to call the oblivious confidence with which a man like Ensor brought a fifteen month old child aboard a slave ship. And an aspect of the property he held in his own slaves produced whiteness. A certainty born of history that events would break in his favor. That all would be well.

“And yet he's willing to lie to himself and say this is going to go all right,” says Johnson.  “Just like it always has been before. And it doesn't. It doesn't go all right.”

For the slave traders, at least. After months of depositions, insurance claims, and detention in jail, all the slaves, including the 19 rebels, were offered freedom. According to Johnson, ignorance and denial on behalf of the whites on board is what made something like this possible. They chose not to see that this "cargo" was capable not only of organization, but heroism. He says it all goes back to when the slave trader, William Merritt, first discovered one of his previously obedient slaves out of the hold.

“That moment seems be an extraordinary moment. This man Merritt, who thought that he was in one kind of history, is forced to confront the idea of the fact that something doesn't make sense. Something's happening that he doesn't understand. He says "but you're the last person I would expect to be out of order on the ship." And then it gradually dawned on him, and he starts to run. And that seems to me to be a moment, and a sense of possibility and danger that it's really worth us trying to imagine and capture.”

This boatwide emancipation was celebrated by abolitionists, and used in efforts to close the U.S. domestic slave trade. New Orleans was the main engine of that trade, and continued to profit from the trade for another 20 years. And although the story of the Brig Creole does not end in New Orleans, it was meant to, and shows the city’s prominent role within an Atlantic world full of slavery and revolution. Talk about rocking the boat…

Identity, Self-Expression And Clashes Within The Enslaved Communities Of Colonial Louisiana

From WWNO | Part of the TriPod: New Orleans At 300 series | 10:09

In this episode of TriPod, Laine Kaplan-Levenson talks with Professor Sophie White about dynamics within slave communities in New Orleans and the story of a runaway named Francisque.

Francisque_1_small

Last week’s TriPod saw an example of solidarity in opposition to slavery among people of African descent. But the dynamics within enslaved communities were complicated, and it was far from one big brotherhood. Allegiances were not automatic, and the story of a runaway named Francisque, who found his way to New Orleans in 1766, shows just that.

“It complicates our sense that just because you were slave you will have empathy towards another slave,” says Sophie White, a professor at the University of Notre Dame, regarding Francisque’s story. She discovered him while combing through the records of the Superior Council of Louisiana.

“In looking at the criminal trials I discovered that most of them involved slaves who are accused of crimes. Other slaves would get to testify in court. And that was very intriguing to me, because we can get a sense of their words, how they express themselves, the stories they want to tell.”

This, White says, is a way to learn more how enslaved people related to and thought of one-another, and themselves.

Francisque came to town at a pivotal time. For roughly 30 years, between the 1730s and 1760s, slaves weren’t being shipped into the colony, so it was a tight knit group -- everyone knew everyone. You think New Orleans is a small town today? Think about when there were fewer than 4,000 people.

This lasted until Spain took over the colony and resumed international slave trade with Africa and the Caribbean, which is around when Francisque rolls up. He’s from the West Indies, although originally he says he's from Philadelphia. “He's been purchased by one man who actually had been from Louisiana, and he’s sold to one of the two founders of St. Louis,” says White. “So he's all over the place, he's a peripatetic character, and I wish we could trace more of him.”

It’s when Francisque is on the boat heading to his new masters in St. Louis that he escapes, and goes to New Orleans. Imagine him walking up, and a bunch of heads turning, all with the same "who’s this guy?" look.

Francisque doesn’t really have a plan, or know how to answer that question, but he goes for it, says White.

“He tries to integrate in this local community, where he encounters problems because he is an outsider. And in a place like New Orleans and Louisiana, where you have a fairly stable population for the years that there have been no new influx of slaves, it's a problem to know what to do with the slave and a problem for him to know how to integrate, and what the rules are, and what the customs are.”

He also straight up needs to survive. He's a runaway; he needs shelter, he needs clothing, he needs to eat. So he goes to the market. White describes his first encounter with this group of slaves he’s trying to infiltrate. “He goes there to buy eggs. He pretends not to be a runaway and says he's just buying eggs on behalf of his master and he will come back with payment later, and he never does. He's broken a rule, that he does not pay for the eggs.”

Agostino Brunias. The Dance of the Handkerchief. ca. 1770-1780.Credit Carmen Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection on deposit at Museo Thyssen-BornemiszaEdit |Remove

White says that might have been okay, but then Francisque  shows up to a dance. At this time, slaves held social dances without the presence of their masters, or any whites. There was hardly any time or place for enslaved people to socialize and form romantic partnerships, but this is where most of that went down. So he comes through, and he’s noted for being very snappily dressed and for dancing with the women. Not only dancing with them, but fronting all flashy like he could take care of them. The men are outraged. White continues with what happened next.

“And later on there's another encounter where these two males come across Francisque and he's got a bundle of laundry. This is a bundle of laundry he's supposed to have stolen. And they fight, and they threaten each other, and the final stage is they actually turn him in. And then the police take over. And then the courts take over.”

Francisque is accused of theft by fellow slaves. And he goes to trial.

Erin Kinchen is the reading room attendant at the Louisiana State Museum’s Louisiana Historical Center. She pulled Francisque’s file, starting with a testimony of an enslaved person against another enslaved person, Francisque, who confesses to being a runaway for a few weeks, but denies stealing anything.

Now we know Francisque’s story and how he perhaps failed to pick up on some social cues. But so what? Sophie White says, a lot. First, there’s jealousy.

“I think that's a lot to do with it. So that's the other big picture of this trial, because clearly he's going there for courtship purposes -- this is what happened at many of these dances and festivities, this is how you would meet your partners. So when you have an outsider coming in and showing off and courting the women... I don't know what the equivalent would be today... you know, take someone home in a limo, maybe. You know, there are things that we expect, so this is what he has.”

This brings us to the main attraction of Francisque’s appearance, what White describes as "what Francisque has." Handkerchiefs. Beaucoup handkerchiefs.

“So this is what he’s dealing with. He was wearing three of four handkerchiefs And specifies around his collar around his neck and elsewhere about him. He’s not just wearing the neckerchief, they’re draped everywhere on him. And so you know, is he planning to gift those to women he might want to court.”

White also points out that because these dances are exclusively for free and enslaved people of color, Francisque isn’t dressing up fancy to impress the white folks. He’s doing it for an audience of fellow slaves.

“I think most self-expression is targeted at a particular group, the group that you either come from, or that you want to belong to. And I think when we look at someone like Francisque this is tricky because he has a sense of some general rules he knows about the importance of handkerchiefs, so he has this artifact and this garment that he can use. But he doesn't quite understand maybe the finer points of how that plays out.”

Francisque is trying to find a mate by showing off, and offering his handkerchiefs. But White says what he’s  really looking for, and just going about in the wrong way, is acceptance and help.

“He tries to avail himself of the support that a runaway could usually get from the local community; they will often offer shelter or food or clothing. And he tries that. But it doesn't really work out for him.”

Because although he picks up on some important cues, like the significance of a handkerchief, he’s too consumed with his appearance and self-image (understandably so), and doesn’t seem to see that he’s angering the locals. You can’t ingratiate yourself with the locals while trying to show them up at the same time. And he doesn’t realize this until it’s too late. Back at the archives of the Superior Council records, Erin Kinchen found Francisque’s sentence, given after a monthlong trial, which she read aloud:

“Francisque, convicted of breaking and entering at night and robbery, of running away, carrying firearms and threatening to shoot: and condemned to be hung and strangled and left on a post, and after 24 hours, his body thrown.”

Francisque’s story shows that it wasn’t always all for one and one for all in the enslaved community. The whites didn’t even know he was a runaway until a fellow slave drew attention to it by turning him in for his crimes.

Perhaps what’s more important here is what Francisque's story tells about individuality among the enslaved. While Francisque was bought and sold as chattel through the port cities of the Atlantic World, he made deliberate attempts to express himself and assert his humanity, in a world bent on denying him those things.

Sighting The Sites Of The New Orleans Slave Trade

From WWNO | Part of the TriPod: New Orleans At 300 series | 09:25

This episode plots points on the map of the domestic slave trade in New Orleans. Producer Laine Kaplan-Levenson visited physical landmarks that bear witness to the city’s role in this national economy.

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This story is part of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city's past to help us better understand present and future challenges. This story visits physical landmarks that bear witness to the city’s role in the national slave trade.

There are some hotels in the French Quarter and Central Business District that have rooftop pools. If you do know this, you do one of two things: you recognize that you’re not a guest at that hotel, and you do not go swimming in that pool. Or, you realize that it’s not difficult to walk through the lobby, take the elevator to the roof, and spend the day poolside, free of charge.

A lot of people choose option B, and they do it at the Omni Orleans on Chartres and St. Louis streets. But what these people might not know is that before the Omni Hotel, there was the St. Louis Hotel. And slaves were sold there.

Historic New Orleans Collection historian and curator Erin Greenwald stands in front of the Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, which was constructed in the 1950s. “This site has the longest lineage in the history of the domestic slave trade here in New Orleans,” she says. “People were bought and sold under the domed rotunda of a fabulously decked out hotel. There wasn’t anywhere else in the country where human beings were bought and sold in such luxurious environs.”

Greenwald’s talking about the domestic slave trade, meaning the sales and movements of peoples within the borders of the United States.

In 1808, the federal government ended the transatlantic and international slave trade, which meant no more shipments of the enslaved from the Caribbean or Africa. Just a few years before that, the Louisiana Purchase opened up all this new land. So as the international slave trade is abolished, there is simultaneously a huge demand for labor in the Deep South.

“When this 1808 law passes, you start seeing this stream, and then outpouring, of people being forcibly moved from the upper to the lower South” explains Greenwald. “And New Orleans becomes the nexus of that trade. It’s the largest slave market in America during the antebellum period.”

Close to a million people make up this forced migration that occurred within the U.S. in the first half of the 19th Century. They came down south by boat, by rail, by stagecoach, and the most unfortunate marched for months from Virginia down the Natchez Trace. The impact goes way beyond those who were bought and sold. Greenwald gives the example of a single slave ship.

“You have 110 people on a ship coming from Baltimore whose lives are forever changed. And then consider all of the people related to those 110 who were left behind. The slave trade caught a lot of people up in its web and that web destroyed tens of thousands of people's lives and communities.”

Once they arrived in New Orleans, many that came by boat were sold before even walking off the deck of the ship. But most people were brought to what’s called a slave pen. In 1829, it became illegal for slave traders to house slaves in the French Quarter. So these pens popped up on the borders.

On the corner of Chartres Street and Esplanade Avenue there now sits a residential home built well after the Civil War. But this site was a slave pen, with a showroom, like an auto dealership, and a yard where enslaved people would sleep, exercise and cook.

These pens were basically jails. And the eating well and physical activity was all so that the traders could sell their property -- humans -- at the highest possible profit. Greenwald walks through the process of a sale.

“A planter comes in with a shopping list, meets with the trader, and then has the individuals line up. And the planter would come and inspect and question the individuals that were prospective purchases.” 

There is no plaque on the wall that surrounds this private property. There are historic plaques around the city, like the one on Press Street that honors where Homer Plessy walked into the "whites-only" train car, for example. Or the one that commemorates the St. Charles Streetcar line in Lee Circle. Well, there are 52 places in New Orleans where slaves were sold. And of those 52, there are only two signs in the city of New Orleans that deal with the slave trade.

“The official signage is on West Bank of the Mississippi River in today’s Algiers Point along the levee, and it recognizes that location’s role in transatlantic slave trade” says Greenwald. “On this side of the river there’s one plaque. It’s on Maspero’s Restaurant, across street from the St. Louis Hotel, and claims to be the site of Maspero’s Exchange. That is not correct!”

The sign claims that Maspero’s Restaurant was the site of Maspero’s Exchange, but that was actually across the street, where the St. Louis Hotel is. So of the 52 sites on the East Bank, only one is marked. And it’s wrong.

The house on the corner of Esplanade Ave. and Chartres St. is a private residence. But Greenwald says there are many options for marking things. “There are plenty of signs in other areas of the city that are private residences that deal with topics that are easier to digest. When you look at the map of this area, this whole block was home to slave traders and slave pen. So if the city was interested in marking that trade, they certainly could put something in the neutral ground here on Esplanade Avenue.”

And yet, there is no such sign.

“It’s much easier for people to get behind celebratory history than to get behind this dark and extremely painful history,” she says.

A few museums have popped up, like the Whitney Plantation, devoted entirely to slavery in the U.S. South. And there are civil rights museums around the country. But there’s a difference between experiencing a public marker and a museum. One’s voluntary.

The only people that are seeing what is in the civil rights museum are the people going to the civil rights museum, as opposed to the tourist from Alabama, say, who’s walking through the French Quarter.

Greenwald says even places that do give guided tours are leaving this stuff out. “This is something that should happen. We should be recognizing all of our history and not simply the parts that look nice for tourists. This is who we are.”

Imagine a plaque outside The Omni Hotel, acknowledging the history of slave auctions on site, and whether locals would still sneak in to take a dip. If there were 50 other plaques downtown to mark these places of the slave trade, imagine what else we might think about.

Slaves Waiting for Sale (Hour Long Version)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:57

The painting that changed minds in Britain at the outbreak of the American Civil War. And more...

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In 1853, Eyre Crowe, a British artist, visited a slave auction in Richmond, Virginia. His painting of the scene was later exhibited at the Royal Gallery in London in 1861. In her new book Slaves Waiting for Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade, Maurie McInnis describes the impact this pivotal painting had on the British Public at the outbreak of the American Civil War. Greg Kimball  talks about a new exhibition of art dealing with the American slave trade. Also: Historian Jonathan White says many Union soldiers were not for re-election of Abraham Lincoln in 1864, and were in fact pressured to vote for him.

Later in the show: 1619 was the year the first Africans arrived on the North American continent. There were at least 20 of them and they came as slaves from Angola. But what’s often overlooked is the culture they brought with them. Many were Christians with European names like Jean Pedro and Angela, and some came from cities. Also featured: When we think of colonial American essayists, New Englanders like Cotton Mather and Ben Franklin come to mind. But recently discovered essays by an anonymous writer who called himself “The Humourist” are now being hailed as some of the best in America’s colonial period. 

1619: The Making of America

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

1619 was the year the first Africans arrived on the North American continent. There were at least 20 of them and they came as slaves from Angola. But what’s often overlooked is the culture they brought with them.

1548pre_7dfe04df193c4c8_small 1619 was the year the first Africans arrived on the North American continent. There were at least 20 of them and they came as slaves from Angola. But what’s often overlooked is the culture they brought with them. Many were Christians with European names like Jean Pedro and Angela, and some came from cities. Scholars Linda Heywood and John Thornton discuss the lives of these first Africans. Also featured: When we think of colonial American essayists, New Englanders like Cotton Mather and Ben Franklin come to mind. But recently discovered essays by an anonymous writer who called himself “The Humourist” are now being hailed as some of the best in America’s colonial period. Brent Kendrick thinks he’s discovered the real identity of their author.

1619: Past and Present (hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:56

- Over 400 years ago, in 1619, the first Africans arrived in English-speaking North America. Cassandra Newby-Alexander explores how we should commemorate that history and what’s at stake when we ignore it.
- How a British king’s fear of being beheaded impacted the expansion of slavery in the US colonies.
-Plantation museums often gloss over that economic history in favor of more romanticized depictions of plantation life.
-Why the myth of the “black Confederate” remains in circulation.

Jamestown-ruin_small

 

Over 400 years ago, in 1619, the first Africans arrived in English-speaking North America. Cassandra Newby-Alexander explores how we should commemorate that history and what’s at stake when we ignore it. And: Richard Chew explains how a British king’s fear of being beheaded impacted the expansion of slavery in the US colonies.

Later in the show: Plantations in America’s South are physical testaments to the great wealth accrued through slave labor. Stephen Hanna says plantation museums often gloss over that economic history in favor of more romanticized depictions of plantation life. Plus: There’s little historical evidence that African Americans supported the Confederate cause by becoming soldiers. Yet this myth of the “black Confederate” remains in circulation. Gabriel Reich studies the way collective memories of the Civil War are shaped and offers ways school curricula could address these problematic narratives.


1619: Past and Present

From With Good Reason | Part of the Black History Month specials series | 51:23

-- Cassandra Newby-Alexander explores how we should commemorate 1619 and what’s at stake when we ignore it. -- Richard Chew explains how a British king’s fear of being beheaded impacted the expansion of slavery in the US colonies.
-- Stephen Hanna says plantation museums often gloss over economic history in favor of more romanticized depictions of plantation life.
-- Gabriel Reich studies the way collective memories of the Civil War are shaped and offers ways school curricula could address these problematic narratives

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Cassandra Newby-Alexander explores how we should commemorate that history and what’s at stake when we ignore it. And: Richard Chew explains how a British king’s fear of being beheaded impacted the expansion of slavery in the US colonies.

Later in the show: Plantations in America’s South are physical testaments to the great wealth accrued through slave labor. Stephen Hanna says plantation museums often gloss over that economic history in favor of more romanticized depictions of plantation life. Plus: There’s little historical evidence that African Americans supported the Confederate cause by becoming soldiers. Yet this myth of the “black Confederate” remains in circulation. Gabriel Reich studies the way collective memories of the Civil War are shaped and offers ways school curricula could address these problematic narratives.

Marking Stories of Slavery (Hour Long Version)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:56

Plantations in America’s South are physical testaments to the great wealth accrued through slave labor. Yet, plantation museums often gloss over that economic history in favor of more romanticized depictions of plantation life.

Slave_cabins_small Plantations in America’s South are physical testaments to the great wealth accrued through slave labor. Yet, Stephen Hanna has found that plantation museums often gloss over that economic history in favor of more romanticized depictions of plantation life. Plus: There’s little historical evidence that African Americans supported the Confederate cause by becoming soldiers. Yet this myth of the “black Confederate” remains in circulation. Gabriel Reich studies the way collective memories of the Civil War are shaped and offers ways school curricula could address these problematic narratives.

Later in the show: Mom’s home cooking, wives’ infidelities, and slaves dining with white families—Jonathan White says you can write a whole history of the Civil War through the dreams of people who lived through it. Also featured: Jesse James was a thief and a cold-blooded killer who gunned down unarmed civilians. So why did newspapers at that time portray him as a folk hero? Cathy Jackson looks at the myth and the reality of one of America’s most notorious outlaws.

1619, Past and Present (hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:54

-- Cassandra Newby-Alexander explores how we should commemorate 1619 and what’s at stake when we ignore it.

-- Richard Chew explains how a British king’s fear of being beheaded impacted the expansion of slavery in the US colonies.

-- Stephen Hanna says plantation museums often gloss over economic history in favor of more romanticized depictions of plantation life.

-- Gabriel Reich studies the way collective memories of the Civil War are shaped and offers ways school curricula could address these problematic narratives.

Jamestown-ruin-300x225_small

Cassandra Newby-Alexander explores how we should commemorate that history and what’s at stake when we ignore it. And: Richard Chew explains how a British king’s fear of being beheaded impacted the expansion of slavery in the US colonies.

Later in the show: Plantations in America’s South are physical testaments to the great wealth accrued through slave labor. Stephen Hanna says plantation museums often gloss over that economic history in favor of more romanticized depictions of plantation life. Plus: There’s little historical evidence that African Americans supported the Confederate cause by becoming soldiers. Yet this myth of the “black Confederate” remains in circulation. Gabriel Reich studies the way collective memories of the Civil War are shaped and offers ways school curricula could address these problematic narratives.

AV History Lesson: 1619 and the First Africans

From WHRV | Part of the Another View series | 54:00

The beginning of African American contributions to this nation began in 1619 right here in Virginia, specifically at Fort Monroe in Hampton, where the first Africans to English North America arrived. On the next Another View, we'll talk about that first landing, and about the pivotal role Fort Monroe played in slavery and emancipation. Our guests include Cassandra Newby-Alexander, Ph.D, Historian and Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Norfolk State University, and Terry Brown, Superintendent, National Park Service Fort Monroe National Monument. Join us as we look back at the history...and look forward as Virginia prepares to commemorate the 400th year of the beginning of our nation.

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The beginning of African American contributions to this nation began in 1619 right here in Virginia, specifically at Fort Monroe in Hampton, where the first Africans to English North America arrived.  On the next Another View, we'll talk about that first landing, and about the pivotal role Fort Monroe played in slavery and emancipation. Our guests include Cassandra Newby-Alexander, Ph.D, Historian and Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Norfolk State University, and Terry Brown, Superintendent, National Park Service Fort Monroe National Monument.  Join us as we look back at the history...and look forward as Virginia prepares to commemorate the 400th year of the beginning of our nation.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr- A Documentary from 1962

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr- a Rewind series series | 54:59

A documentary from 1962 about Martin Luther King Jr. It presents a compelling portrait of a young Baptist preacher who was determined to change the world through non-violent tactics.

Masssey-king-book_small A documentary from 1962 about Martin Luther King Jr. It presents a compelling portrait of a young Baptist preacher who was determined to change the world through non-violent tactics. This is the first of six programs that reflect on Dr. King's legacy.

Harlem In Revolt - Part #1

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the Harlem In Revolt (3 Parts) series | 54:59

A little more than fifty years ago, 1963, was a time of great upheaval in the United States. The fight for civil rights was in full force with people like Martin Luther King Jr., Stokeley Carmichael and Malcolm X making headlines. During this historic time, CBC Radio commissioned a young writer called Austin Clarke to make a documentary.

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He travelled to Harlem to find out what living conditions were like for the African-Americans who lived there. In later years Clarke would go on to become a celebrated author, whose novel The Polished Hoe won the Giller Prize in 2002. But in 1963, he was a young freelancer with a microphone and a notebook. The results were powerful.

The world saw pictures from Birmingham, Alabama that showed police dogs attacking demonstrators. They were also beaten, sprayed with fire hoses and arrested. Martin Luther King Jr was one of them. While he was in prison, he wrote his famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" which called for non-violent civil disobedience to fight racism and segregation. Later that year, King's 'March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom' brought a quarter of a million people to the nation's capital. And it was there that he delivered his famous 'I Have a Dream' Speech.

It was during this period of upheaval, CBC Radio produced this documentary on the African-American condition. However, it focussed not on Alabama, Mississippi or any other southern state, but on the integrated city of New York. This documentary aimed to answer the question: what was life like for African-Americans in the north where integration had been achieved, at least on paper? Were the residents of Harlem any better off than blacks in the south? 

Austin Clarke
To find some answers, a journalist by the name of Austin Clarke went to live in Harlem. Today, years later, Clarke is a celebrated author in Canada and abroad. But at the time, Clarke had come to Canada from Barbados in 1955. He spent two years at the University of Toronto and then worked as a reporter in Northern Ontario. 

In order to prepare for this documentary 'Harlem In Revolt', Clarke spent several weeks in Harlem. He watched, listened and recorded interviews. Because he was black himself, Clarke felt that he got honest and emotional reactions.

Malcolm X
Malcolm X, the controversial black leader who was later assassinated, was one of the people he talked to. Malcolm X was a member of member of the Nation of Islam, a group that advocated radical action. It was a foil to Martin Luther King Jr's non-violent approach to fighting segregation.

Clarke's documentary captures a clear and valuable portrait of some important moments in American history. 

He recorded anger and frustration. But he also captured ideas for change and even cautious hope for the future.

Before listening to this documentary, a note about language. The word 'Negro' is used throughout the program. In 1963, it was the prevailing term, with 'black' gaining momentum. However, Malcolm X had started using the phrase African-American, and you'll hear that later on.

Part Two, the second part of this documentary, features a longer interview with Malcolm X. He was the charismatic voice of the Nation of Islam, a religious and political group which believed in a separate state for African-Americans.  Malcolm X explained why the time for reconciliation had passed and that separation was the only option.

Part Three is the unedited conversation between Malcolm X and Austin Clarke. It's narrated by CBC Radio host Michael Enright.

Harlem In Revolt - Part #2

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the Harlem In Revolt (3 Parts) series | 54:59

This is the second hour of the documentary 'Harlem In Revolt.' It was made by a young writer called Austin Clarke and looked at the state of Harlem circa 1963. It was a time of great change in the United States, with the fight for civil rights in full force. Clarke travelled to Harlem to talk to the African-Americans who lived there.

In this hour Clarke chronicled the emergence of the black determination to find new strength and power in identity.

Prx_-_malcolm_x_portrait_small The growth of extreme religious and political groups such as the Black Muslims and the African Nationalist Movement were the first steps in this revolution. Clarke spoke to Malcolm X, the fiery spokesman for the Black Muslims, who presented arguments in favour of separation. Bonus Feature!  Also look for our special bonus - 'Harlem In Revolt - Part#3' the raw unedited version of Austin Clarke's interview with Malcolm X.

1963 was a time of social upheaval. It was the summer of Martin Luther's King Jr's March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. It was there that King delivered his 'I Have a Dream' Speech. 1963 was also the summer of the Birmingham riots with police dogs and water cannons being used on black citizens who were demonstrating in the streets.

It was in the midst of this historic period that Austin Clarke went to Harlem for CBC Radio. Austin Clarke has gone on to become a prominent and award winning writer, but at the time he was a young journalist with a story to tell. You'll hear his passion and his deft writing and interviewing skills.

James Hicks and Richard B. Moore
One of the people Clarke interviews was James Hicks, the editor of The New York Amsterdam News. It's America's oldest black newspaper situated in the heart of Harlem. Hicks talked about the role of black newspapers during these troubled times. Hicks' prediction about the effect of a racial clash in Harlem was prophetic. Less than a year later, the Harlem Riots of 1964 lasted six nights, left one person dead and more than a hundred injured. There were also riots in more than a dozen other American cities.

Clark also spoke with Richard B. Moore, a prominent civil rights activist and communist who lived in Harlem in New York City. Moore strongly advocated against using the word Negro because he said it was associated with the slave trade. 

Malcolm X
1963 was a pivotal year in the history of American civil rights.  Early in 1963 Martin Luther King was jailed for taking part in a peaceful demonstration in Birmingham, Alabama.  Later that year he led his March on Washington. 

President John F. Kennedy delivered a civil rights address that called for an end to segregation. In St. Augustine Florida, four black teenagers were jailed for sitting at a whites-only lunch counter. In Birmingham Alabama the Ku Klux Klan bombed a black church that killed four children.

1963 was also a time of rising influence for the young black leader named Malcolm X.  He was a member and leader of the Nation of Islam, a religious and political group which believed in a separate state for African-Americans. 

CBC Radio's Austin Clarke managed to get an interview with Malcolm X for this documentary. Over fifty years later it stands as an important record.  Shortly after this interview, the black leader left the Nation of Islam.  Less than a year after that, he was assassinated.

Clarke worked hard to track down Malcolm X. Clarke is quoted as saying "This interview was the fruitful result of two weeks spent tracking down Malcolm X in Harlem: at the Muslim Restaurant, at Muhammad Speaks (the Muslims' newspaper office), and in bars and restaurants, where I asked if anyone had seen Malcolm X.  And then he called. My reward was an hour of his time. His time was golden.  He was a very busy man and this was the first radio interview in my life. I was terrified by the obvious importance of the interview, and more scared when Malcolm X, agreed to the interview..."

Assassination of Malcolm X
In the months after this interview Malcolm X severed his ties with the Nation of Islam and became a Sunni Muslim. He also regretted some of the views he had espoused while he was with the Nation of Islam, saying: "I did many things as a [Black] Muslim that I'm sorry for now. I was a zombie then ... pointed in a certain direction and told to march". Many Nation of Islam members considered him a traitor. In February 1965, Malcolm X was assassinated in New York by members of the Nation of Islam.

Austin Clarke
Austin Clarke continues his career as a writer and has published over twenty books of novels, short stories and memoirs. Recounting that interview with Malcolm X, Austin Clarke commented that after it aired on CBC Radio, "I would say my life was made."

Part three of this documentary is the full unedited conversation between Malcolm X and Austin Clarke. It's narrated by CBC Radio host Michael Enright. 

Harlem In Revolt - Part #3 (Malcolm X unedited interview)

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the Harlem In Revolt (3 Parts) series | 01:09:59

Malcolm X 1963: The uncut interview.

Prx_-_malcolm_x_portrait_small Bonus Feature!
In 1963, a young Canadian writer called Austin Clarke went to Harlem to make a documentary about the African American experience of living in Harlem. He interviewed a wide variety of people: community workers, historians, , journalists as well as many of the residents of Harlem. One of them was a provocative and brilliant young black activist named Malcolm X.  He was a member and leader of the Nation of Islam, the religious and political group which believed in a separate state for African-Americans. 

Austin Clarke managed to record an interview with Malcolm X for his documentary 'Harlem In Revolt.' More than fifty years later it stands as an important record.  Shortly after this interview, the black leader left the Nation of Islam. Less than a year after that, he was assassinated.

In the documentary 'Harlem In Revolt' he included just a short portion of the full interview. We thought you might like to hear the whole thing here. It's explosive, incendiary and sounds more like a rant than an interview at times.  But it's also a fascinating record of a man and a time in his own words. 

A reminder that the word 'Negro' was in common use then, although its use was starting to be questioned and gradually supplanted by black or African American. Nevertheless, you will hear 'Negro' used frequently.

We present the full uncut version of Austin Clarke's interview with Malcolm X recorded in late 1963.

Reconstructing Danville (hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:57

-In 1883 a young African American worker was alleged to have brushed shoulders with a white woman as they passed each other on a narrow sidewalk in Danville, Virginia. A race riot erupted.
-The life of a Danville industrialist and former Confederate soldier, William T. Sutherlin, who led a skewed Congressional investigation into the 1883 riot.
-Connecting the dots between the Danville riots and the codification of Jim Crow laws in Virginia’s 1902 Constitution.

Wgrnewlogo_medium_small In 1883 a young African American worker was alleged to have brushed shoulders with a white woman as they passed each other on a narrow sidewalk in Danville, Virginia. A race riot erupted and Jane Dailey  says the white supremacist backlash that followed led to the disenfranchisement of Black Virginians for nearly 100 years. And: Jeff McClurken discusses the life of a Danville industrialist and former Confederate soldier, William T. Sutherlin, who led a skewed Congressional investigation into the 1883 riot.
Later in the show: Tom Costa connects the dots between the Danville riots and the codification of Jim Crow laws in Virginia’s 1902 Constitution. 

American Terrorism (hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:59

-In 1979, members of the KKK shot and killed five labor and civil rights activists in Greensboro, North Carolina. The killings still reverberates in the racial politics of Greensboro today. -How radical African American writers, in pre Civil War era, used the philosophical principles of the Enlightenment to unmask the barbarism of slavery.
-One of the darkest pages of American history is the racial terror inflicted on thousands of African Americans through lynching. Gianluca De Fazio and his students have developed a website "Racial Terror: Lynching in Virginia".
-A memorial service to pay tribute to the lives of the thousands of people who suffered lynching in the United States.

Smach-the-klan-1004x618_small In 1979, members of the KKK shot and killed five labor and civil rights activists in Greensboro, North Carolina. Aran Shetterly, who is writing a book about the incident, says it still reverberates in the racial politics of Greensboro today. Also: The European philosophers of the Enlightenment argued that Europeans were civilized, but Africans were barbarians. Stefan Wheelock describes how radical African American writers used those same philosophical principles to unmask the barbarism of slavery.

Later on: One of the darkest pages of American history is the racial terror inflicted on thousands of African Americans through lynching. Gianluca De Fazio and his students have developed a website Racial Terror: Lynching in Virginia, 1877-1927 that focuses on telling the stories of all the 104 known lynching victims who were killed in Virginia between 1877 and 1927, nearly all of them African American men. Plus: Renee Hill coordinated a memorial service to pay tribute to the lives of the thousands of people who suffered lynching in the United States.


 

Haiti & New Orleans: Is The Feeling Mutual?

From WWNO | Part of the TriPod: New Orleans At 300 series | 59:00

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with an hour-long special that explores two places linked in history. called “Haiti and New Orleans: Is the Feeling Mutual?”

Capdoublestory_small TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with an hour-long special that explores two places linked in history. called “Haiti and New Orleans: Is the Feeling Mutual?”

Two Years With Franz

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 57:59

What if you have a story that's really complicated, and you have 546 tapes to listen to, and you get obsessed and don't know where to stop? All of those things were true for "Two Years with Franz."

1_franz_ps_small The "Two Years" refers to the two years of tapes recorded by the Pulitzer-winning poet Franz Wright before his death, AND the two years Bianca Giaever spent listening to them, which ended over the past few months as she and I figured out what to do with it all. This is a story of art and love, of madness and beauty, of youth and age and death.  More Info Here

Produced for Transom.org  

 


Transom.org
  channels new work and voices to public radio, with a focus on the power of story, and on the mission of public media in a changing media environment. Transom won the first Peabody Award ever granted exclusively to a website. Transom.org is a project of Atlantic Public Media which runs the Transom Story Workshops and founded WCAI, the public radio station in Woods Hole, Mass.



Support for this work comes from National Endowment for the Arts 
 

 

National Endowment for the Arts


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The Mayor of Nichols

From Third Coast International Audio Festival | 34:33

A remembrance of a friend from junior high school who was murdered in 2000 by a chicago policeman

Default-piece-image-1 In 1972, I knew Arthur Earl Hutchinson as an eighth grader, full of beans. In 2000 he was shot by a Chicago policeman and killed. At the time he was described as homeless. I wanted to go back and try and find out what happened to him in the thirty three years since I had last seen him. This piece is a personal remembrance.
Featured on Transom.org. For more information and conversation, visit "The Mayor of Nichols" on Transom.

Girl Detectives

From Sue Mell | 17:57

The aftermath of a friend's murder and the search for resolution in the face of an unexplained death.

Playing
Girl Detectives
From
Sue Mell

Grldet Girl Detectives is a poignant and personal piece about the struggles of three women to cope with the murder of a beloved friend in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Frustrated and unsatisfied with the findings of the police, they try to do some investigating of their own but are ultimately unable to provide any clear resolution. In the end, they can only continue to search inwardly for peace. As it tells the story of Susan and Stephanie--two lively and determined women--and their attempt to step out of their assigned roles as providers of comfort and take action on behalf of their friend, it also reveals the producer's attempt to make something meaningful and worthwhile out of these terrible events. Featured on Transom.org. For more information and conversation, visit the "Girl Detectives" on Transom.

Of A Piece

From Michelle Orange | 17:05

A father/daughter meditation on divorce, tradition and jigsaw puzzles

Dad_small How do you maintain family traditions, or build new ones, after a divorce? Would an 8,000-piece jigsaw puzzle help? Michelle Orange thinks so. In fact, she'd even go 12,500. This lovely and unconventional radio telling is about Michelle and her father, about tradition and habit, obsession and commitment, and the Sistine Chapel Ceiling and the Garden of Earthly Delights. Featured on Transom.org. For more information and conversation, visit the "Of A Piece" on Transom.

Sweet Phil from Sugar Hill

From Phyllis Fletcher | 28:57

A man has 14 children with 13 different women, dies young, and leaves them to learn about him through each other, and through the letters he wrote from prison.

Momdadmecolor_small "It hurts me to have left so many kids out there in this world. But believe me, at the rate that I was going, if somebody were to have to go, it was always best for the kid and the mother that I was the one to go." My father wrote me these words, and many more, from prison. Before we were reunited, he died, leaving behind 14 children with 13 different mothers. In Sweet Phil from Sugar Hill, I seek out my siblings and their mothers, and draw from their voices a portrait of the father we never knew. My dad speaks for himself in excerpts from his letters, read throughout the piece by his first-born son. Featured on Transom.org. For more information and conversation, visit "Sweet Phil from Sugar Hill" on Transom.

The Orphan Train

From Annie Wu | 52:59

Orphan Train riders re-live their journeys in search of a home in the West.

Playing
The Orphan Train
From
Annie Wu

Advertisement_small This fall marks the anniversary of one of the least known and yet most significant social experiments in American history. In September, 1854, the first "orphan train" carried 46 homeless children from New York City to far off homes to become laborers in the pioneer West. It was the first step in what was to become the emigration of as many as 250,000 orphan children to new homes throughout the entire United States. Widely duplicated throughout its 75 year history, the original orphan train was the creation and life project of the now forgotten man who was to become the father of American child welfare policy. Some of the most famous orphan train riders included songwriter Eden Ahbez, author of the Nat King Cole classic "Nature Boy," as well as John Brady, a governor of Alaska and Andrew Burke, second governor of North Dakota. More than 150 years after the first orphan train, the remaining riders are scattered across the country, and their descendants live in communities like yours. This new unnarrated one hour documentary features interviews from surviving orphan train riders as well as readings from period newspapers, letters and journals. The show is laced with an eclectic mix of traditional folk, classical and impressionist music. A 25-minute version of the show will air on "Soundprint" on Dec. 10, 2004.

The View from Room 205

From WBEZ | 59:00

"The View from Room 205" is a one-hour documentary that takes an unflinching look at the intersection of poverty and education in this country. It tells the story of a fourth grade classroom at William Penn Elementary, a public school in one of the nation’s poorest neighborhoods, North Lawndale on Chicago’s West Side. The documentary weaves together human stories in the school, from the children to their teacher to the principal, and pulls back to explain the big picture. It looks at poverty’s hold on school achievement and explores the unintended consequences of a core belief driving school reform today – that poverty is no excuse for low achievement.

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The View from Room 205 is a one-hour documentary that takes an unflinching look at the intersection of poverty and education in this country. It tells the story of a fourth grade classroom at William Penn Elementary, a public school in one of the nation’s poorest neighborhoods, North Lawndale on Chicago’s West Side. The documentary weaves together human stories in the school, from the children to their teacher to the principal, and pulls back to explain the big picture. It looks at poverty’s hold on school achievement and explores the unintended consequences of a core belief driving school reform today – that poverty is no excuse for low achievement.

Peabody Award-winning reporter Linda Lutton of WBEZ Chicago spent months reporting from Penn and the neighborhood around the school. Her work tackles fundamental questions about how we educate poor children, and whether schools can actually overcome poverty. It documents—often painfully—how we struggle and fail to lift poverty’s burdens off children. It is an hour that is personal, up-close, story-driven, and of far-reaching national importance.

Stations airing this special can find images, audiograms and suggested language for social media in this toolkit. Addititonally, you can download the pdf under the Additional Files section in this piece page. 

Filmspotting 735 (06/28/19): Top 5 Films of 2019 (So Far)

From WBEZ | Part of the Filmspotting (weekly series) series | 54:00

Midway through the year, Adam and Josh run down their lists for the best films of 2019 (so far).

Her-smell_small Midway through the year, Adam and Josh run down their lists for the best films of 2019 (so far).

Steve Huskey - Kidnapped in Caracas, Venezuela

From Abigail Mahnke, host of Inner Views | 27:37

In 2003, Steve Huskey was just stepping out of a taxi in Caracas, Venezuela, when an imposing man told him to get in his car or else be killed. Steve was being kidnapped. What ensued was a hellish night of driving around the city with guns and machetes directed at him. Their goal: money. The only trouble is, kidnappings and murders are so prevalent in Caracas, Steve is not sure he'll make it out alive.

Steve_huskey_small Steve Huskey had been to Caracas, Venezuela many times for work. When his flight was delayed, a taxi returned him to his hotel. Ordinarily the taxi would take him into the hotel compound but the entrance was blocked, so Steve had to get out on the street. Next thing he knows, he's approached by a "linkbacker" type guy who tells him to get into his car or else be killed. Steve considers making a run for it but realizes two other men are there, one with a gun and the other with a machete. What ensues is a heliish night of driving around the city with a gun pointed at him while they attempt to get money from his credit card at ATMs throughout the city. Steve makes it out alive without exactly telling us how. This is a defining moment in Steve's life.

Steven Boyd - Gastroparesis & Amazing Dog Named Djaingo

From Abigail Mahnke, host of Inner Views | 26:15

Steven is an Army veteran with a chronic stomach disease called gastroparesis. In the last 9 years he has been in the hospital 84 times, and gone through 13 surgeries, 4 heart attacks and 7 kidney failures. His constant companion is his dog Djaingo, who comforts him and can alert the neighbors when Steven needs medical attention. Steven and Djaingo have gotten fame via YouTube—in a video Steven created, he and Djaingo say grace: www.youtube.com/watch?v=tN5Ype29zuM

Steven_djaingo_small In 2002, Steven was diagnosed with gastroparesis, a debilitating illness that is a partial paralysis of the stomach. On any given day, Steven has no idea whether or not his body will digest his food or if he'll be vomiting for the entire day. This has completely altered his life - he can no longer work - this after a hardcore military life where he was a sniper, paratrooper and counter narcotics officer. He has been in the hospital over 84 times, had 4 heart attacks, 7 kidney failures and 13 surgeries.

Admitting to some exceptionally low times in life and contemplating suicide, Steven adopted Djaingo, an Australian cattle dog slated to be euthanized the next day. Djaingo went from being a fearful and aggressive dog deemed untrainable, to a sweet, loving and highly trained dog. You may have seen Djaingo saying grace on YouTube - www.youtube.com/watch?v=tN5Ype29zuM - the video sensation that has been viewed over 7 million times and featured on Jay Leno, David Letterman, CNN and Fox.

Steven takes us through the illness, how he's affected by it, and how he spends his time. He tells us about Djaingo and his transformation, how Djaingo alerts the neighbors when Steven needs medical help, and how he has gotten past those low, low points when he no longer wanted to exist.