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Playlist: July 4th - ARCHIVE

Compiled By: PRX Administrator

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Humankind: An Informed Republic

From Humankind | 59:00

Ideal for broadcast around July 4th: America's founders knew their democracy required informed citizens, but is quality journalism now threatened by the decline of print newspapers? With Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, Pulitzer-winning historians.

Informed_republic_wide_small America's founders recognized that that without a king, the fledgling nation would need an informed citizenry -- or their bold experiment in democracy would fail. So in early America the government subsidized newspapers, established the postal system to facilitate information flow and drew up plans for public education. But now in the digital age, does the demise of newspapers threaten citizens' access to quality journalistic information? Does remarkably low civic knowledge by average Americans weaken the fabric of democracy? This new one-hour Humankind documentary features retired Supreme Court justice Sandra Day O'Connor, Pulitzer Prize-winning historians Gordon Wood and Annette Gordon-Reed, new media analyst Robert McChesney, voices of tourists at the Newseum, and others. Hosted by David Freudberg and produced in association with WGBH/Boston.

Independence Day 2011 - The Founding of America 11-26

From All Classical Public Media | Part of the The Score with Edmund Stone series | 59:00

This week on The Score with Edmund Stone, The Founding of America.

Edmund_for_the_score_ad_8-2012_small This week on The Score with Edmund Stone, The Founding of America, with scores from films about our nation's beginnings including The Madness of King George, Jefferson in Paris, John Adams, and The Last of the Mohicans on the next edition of The Score.

The Church of Pancakes

From KUFM - Montana Public Radio | Part of the Notes From the Huntley Project series | 58:45

Emotion battles ethics in this action-packed caper. Nine-year-old Jaybird and his partner in crime, Kenny, love the Fourth of July — the sound of a burning fuse and the smell of gunpowder. But coming up with the perfect plan to rob the local fireworks stand is going to be harder than they expected.

Cop_fireworks-stand_small In Notes from the Huntley Project , Jay Kettering's comedic and thought-provoking radio series, a middle-aged man reflects on a childhood spent in small-town space-time, where love meets mysticism and adventure meets imagination.

Episode I:  My Dad and Pre-Socratic Thought

Episode II:  How I Learned to Tell Time

Episode III:  The Church of Pancakes

Emotion battles ethics in this action-packed caper. Nine-year-old Jaybird and his partner in crime, Kenny, love the sound of a burning fuse and the smell of gunpowder—on the Fourth of July, they get high just inhaling the air. But coming up with the perfect plan to rob the local fireworks stand is going to be harder than they expected. Perhaps because in their world, moon landings and tripping on psychedelic dog food are no more unusual than becoming fireproof with a kiss. And the instigator of this crime of passion, the bewitching ten-year-old Mexican migrant worker, Carlita Milkey, only makes the task of distinguishing the real from the imagined all the more difficult. Listen in as the fifty-three-year-old narrator recalls his nine-year-old self, revealing what a kid will do for love and what the love of a memory can do to the heart and mind of a storyteller.

The Church of Pancakes was written by Jay Kettering
Directed by Teresa Waldorf

Performed by:
David Mills-Low: Narrator, Jaybird
Anne-Marie Williams: Carlita Milkey
Cody Hysolp: Mr. Oltroggie, Kenny Finch
Reid Reimers: Dad, Adolphus Johansson aka Apple Juice
Teresa Waldorf: Nardo Aquino, random kids

Recorded by Beth Anne Austein in the studios of Montana Public Radio
Edited and produced by Chérie Newman

Compact Discoveries 105: The Dream of America

From Fred Flaxman | Part of the Compact Discoveries series | 58:00

Peter Boyer's "Ellis Island: The Dream of America" is featured, performed by the Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by the composer.

Cdslogo2inch_small Peter Boyer's "Ellis Island: The Dream of America" is featured, performed by the Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by the composer with a cast of well-known actors reading texts from the Ellis Island Oral History Project. The hour concludes with Belgian composer Henri Vieuxtemps' "Yankee Doodle Variations" and James Raphael's piano arrangement of John Philip Sousa's "The Stars and Stripes Forever." Although this program was designed for use on or around July 4, it can be used anytime as Independence Day is not actually mentioned. Complete script available here and at www.compactdiscoveries.com.

Compact Discoveries 156: Independence Day

From Fred Flaxman | Part of the Compact Discoveries series | 57:30

Out-of-the-box selections for July 4th.

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Designed for broadcast on or shortly before July 4, this program features off-the-beaten-track music for the occasion, including Morton Gould's American Salute, his "Star-Spangled Overture" from American Ballads; "Celebration - Fourth of July" from Star-Spangled Symphony by Don Gillis; Henri Vieuxtemps' Yankee Doodle Variations; Ruggero Leoncavallo's Yankee March; Three American Dances by Henry Gilbert; The Union by Louis Moreau Gottschalk; and America Medley by Leonard Bernstein.

The USA Plan

From Hearing Voices | Part of the The Plan series | 29:06

An All-American festival of fireworks-fueled patriotic fury, from a bi-lingual Pledge of Allegiance to Fourth of July in the national forest with 25,000 of the Rainbow Family.

Plan2church_small This week The Plan celebrates America and Americans: PLAYLIST: ARTIST | AUDIO | ALBUM (*=PRX piece) 1. Barrett Golding | The Pledge* | HearingVoices.com 2. Guillermo Gomez-Pena | PSA: Pledge | My Life in the Bush of Ghosts 3. Crossing the BLVD | Names | CrossingTheBLVD.org 4. The Books | Be Good To Them Always | Lost and Safe 5. Firesign Theatre | US Plus | NPR "April Fools" ads 6. Barrett Golding | Rainbow Family | HearingVoices.com Audio promo is 0:30.

Marching for Change: Street Bands in the U.S.

From Making Contact | 29:00

We look at how political marching bands are stirring up public spaces; from the streets, to supermarkets to your facebook feed.

Image_small There's an Emma Goldman saying that goes something like this: "If I can't dance, I don't want your revolution!" Well, in the past decade, more and more political marching bands have been invigorating social movements. In some cases, they're the protest themselves. On this edition, we look at how musicians are stirring up public spaces; from the streets, to supermarkets to your facebook feed.

NOTE FOR STATIONS:  You can listen or purchase any of the 3 individual segments from this show, if you are looking for something shorter:
http://www.prx.org/pieces/52985-marching-to-the-beat-of-their-own-drums
Marching to the Beat of their Own Drums 9:49

http://www.prx.org/pieces/52990-street-bands-bring-protest-to-the-internet-through
Street Bands Bring Protest to the Internet through Flash Mobs 10:54

http://www.prx.org/pieces/52987-the-life-and-death-of-the-infernal-noise-brigade

The Life and Death of the Infernal Noise Brigade 8:26

Featuring:

Sarah Valentine, musician, Hungry March Band; Daniel Lang-Levitsky, musician, Rude Mechanical Orchestra; Michele Hardesty, founding (and former) member of the Rude Mechanical Orchestra; Jenna Barrett, musician, Infernal Noise Brigade, I-Ching, musician, Infernal Noise Brigade; Grey Filastine, musician, Infernal Noise Brigade; Ronica Sanyal, vocalist and musician, Infernal Noise Brigade; Jamie Spector, founding member, Brass Liberation Orchestra; Sarah Norr, musician, Brass Liberation Orchestra; Ofir Uziel, musician, Brass Liberation Orchestra.

Contributing Producers: Sarah Danson and Jill Friedberg
Producer/Online Editor: Pauline Bartolone
Producer: Andrew Stelzer
Executive Director: Lisa Rudman
Associate Director: Khanh Pham
Volunteer Coordinator: Karl Jagbandhansingh
Station Relations: Daphne Young
Web Editor: Jeff Giaquinto
Production Interns: Organizational Volunteers: Dan Turner, Ron Rucker, Alton Byrd & Alfonso Hooker

1776

From Cambridge Forum | 28:55

Historian David McCullough portrays the tumult and uncertainty of 1776 and shows how the courage and perseverance of a few dedicated men were responsible for the success of the American revolutionary experiment.

Playing
1776
From
Cambridge Forum

1776_small Historian David McCullough brings to life the tumult and uncertainty of 1776 and shows how the courage and perseverance of a few dedicated men were responsible for the success of the American revolutionary experiment. In his new book, "1776," McCullough recreates the context of life-and-death military struggle that heralded the birth of the United States of America. Recorded in June 2005, not yet broadcast.

"What is American?"

From Littleglobe | 27:40

In this edition of Audio Revolution! hosts Gabriel Rima and Savannah Chapman-Martinez take you into the depths of identity: What does it mean to be American? Who gets to be American and who doesn’t? What are the freedoms and privileges American’s have? And, do all American’s have those freedoms? And what does it mean to be both American and another ethnicity and/or culture? These are some of the questions that get explored in this intense and immense Audio Revolution!

5423820887_efab75a8bd_small In this edition of Audio Revolution! hosts Gabriel Rima and Savannah Chapman-Martinez take you into the depths of identity: What does it mean to be American? Who gets to be American and who doesn’t? What are the freedoms and privileges American’s have? And, do all American’s have those freedoms? And what does it mean to be both American and another ethnicity and/or culture? These are some of the questions that get explored in this intense and immense Audio Revolution!

Fourth of July Feature: Playing with Fire: Behind the Music and Fireworks at the Hollywood Bowl

From Anny Celsi | 05:00

In communities all over America, summer means outdoor concerts – and fireworks. Can you hear the “1812 Overture” without picturing brightly colored starbursts against a summer sky? And setting off fireworks to live music – that’s a performance in itself! Go behind the scenes with the pyro-musical team that lights up the Hollywood Bowl.

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Some people come for the music; some for the picnic. But for many Angelenos, summer at the Hollywood Bowl is all about the fireworks. Can you hear the “1812 Overture” without picturing brightly colored starbursts against a summer sky? And setting off fireworks to live music is a performance in itself. 

Eric Elias designs and directs the yearly fireworks spectaculars that accompany the L.A. Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl. With lively brown eyes behind round glasses, white hair and beard, and a calm, ever-present smile, he reminds you of your favorite college professor.   Hard to believe he spends his summers firing off rockets! And contrary to what people assume, he tells me, the job is not done by computers.  With a live orchestra onstage, the display must be timed and fired by human beings.  “What we do at the Hollywood Bowl is truly fireworks to music. And it's to live music,” says Elias – which can sometimes be tricky. “No matter what they tell you, if the conductor has one cup of coffee for rehearsal and two cups of coffee before the show - they play faster!”

Just as a percussion player would hit the castanets, Elias pushes a red button on his console that launches the fireworks placed above the bowl.  You could say he’s almost part of the orchestra – he’s definitely part of the performance.  But without knowing how to play or read music, how does Elias stay on the beat?

Sarah Hiner is his score reader.  A classically trained bassoonist, she both reads the score and watches the conductor in order to give Elias his cues. If the conductor varies the time, skips or repeats a passage, it’s her job to keep the show going in time with the music.

“I can follow the conductor,” says Hiner. But outside collaboration concerts are another story. “When rock and roll bands come in, and somebody decides to take an extra solo, or forgets a line, or completely changes what they're doing mid-stream - then we have to get a little creative!”

“And the one thing that we never want to see in the score,” adds Elias, “are the words ‘vamp’ and ‘solo.’ Because oftentimes we have no idea how long that's going to take, or where it's going to go!”

Hiner says it’s definitely one of the more interesting jobs she’s had as a musician.

I've performed in concerts, I've managed venues, I've worked with artists,” says Hiner, “and it's the one job I've done that still excites my dad to this day – the fact that I work with the fireworks crew at the Hollywood Bowl.”

I sat with Elias and Hiner as they rehearsed the score for Aaron Copland’s Hoe-Down for an upcoming program.  While Hiner marked the score, Elias worked out the cues to go with the fireworks display he has designed entirely in his head.  

“I want one there – one there – and one there,” he decides, noting the beats he wants to emphasize with a bang.  “But do I want two or three there? I think musically it makes sense to only have two?”

 

“You could put it on the bass drum,” Hiner suggests. “And the conductor might take a pause here – most conductors do.”

There’s no rehearsing the fireworks – they can be deployed once, and only once.  So on performance day, along with the audience, they’ll see their work for the first – and only – time.

 

Hoe-Down will be done once and probably never again,” says Elias.  “So our work literally goes up in smoke!”

Civil War Re-enactors

From Jake Warga | 04:50

A non-narrated portrait of a small group of Civil War buffs re-dedicating a Union veteran's grave in Oregon and reflecting on when our nation, as we understand it, was created. "We have the best country in the world, bar none."

Civilwarpic_small Good for any patriotic holiday: Veteran's, Memorial, 4th of July, Christmas...

Two lengths/Versions
4:49 (featuring more voices)
2:02 (fewer)

Orig. Aired Memorial Day 5/25/2009 "All Things Considered" (2min Version)
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=104521881