%s1 / %s2

Playlist: Memorial Day -- ARCHIVED

Compiled By: PRX Administrator

Caption: PRX default Playlist image
No text

Beyond Glory - Three short pieces by Stephen Lang

From Playing on Air | Part of the Playing on Air Hour Length Episodes series | 53:00

"As starkly moving as taps at dusk" says the Washington Post about BEYOND GLORY, a powerful tribute to military valor written and performed by stage and screen star Stephen Lang (Colonel Quaritch in Avatar). He portrays three recipients of the MEDAL OF HONOR recounting in their own words the incident that earned them the United States' highest military honor ..

201510101033274577_small

"As starkly moving as taps at dusk" says the Washington Post about Beyond Glory, a powerful tribute to military valor written and performed by stage and screen star Stephen Lang (Colonel Quaritch in Avatar). He portrays three recipients of the MEDAL OF HONOR recounting in their own words the incident that earned them the United States' highest military honor for valor beyond the call of duty.

These three stories of Nick Bacon, First Sergeant, US Army, Vietnam; Clarence Sasser, combat medic, Vietnam; and Hector Cafferata, Private First Class, 1st Marine Division, Korea are based on their own words. They are portraits from Stephen Lang's one-man show, Beyond Glory, based on the book by Larry Smith of the same title. Each segment is followed by conversation between Mr. Lang and Playing on Air's producer and host, Claudia Catania. 
"One of the richest, most complex pieces of acting I've seen in my theater going life." The Wall Street Journal

Beyond Glory, Part 2 - Two short pieces by Stephen Lang

From Playing on Air | Part of the Playing on Air Hour Length Episodes series | 53:00

"One of the richest, most complex pieces of acting I've seen in my theater going life." The Wall Street Journal

"As starkly moving as taps at dusk" says the Washington Post about BEYOND GLORY, a powerful tribute to military valor written and performed by stage and screen star Stephen Lang (Colonel Quaritch in Avatar). In BEYOND GLORY, Part 2 Mr. Lang portrays three recipients of the MEDAL OF HONOR recounting in their own words the incident that earned each of them the United States' highest military honor for valor beyond the call of duty.

The first short of BEYOND GLORY, Part 2 is JOHN WILLIAM FINN. Chief Petty Officer Finn was stationed at Naval Base Kaneohe Bay on the morning of Sunday, December 7, 1941, when Pearl Harbor was attacked by the Japanese. He manned a machine gun from an exposed position for the duration of the attack. This is John Finn's own account of that morning adapted by Stephen Lang who also performs the role of John William Finn. The second short play is VERNON BAKER AND DANIEL INOUYE. First Lieutenant Vernon Baker received the Medal of Honor for his actions during World War II, April 1945, near Viareggio, in Tuscany, Italy and Captain Daniel Inouye (who later became the long-serving US Senator from Hawaii) was grievously wounded while leading an assault on a heavily-defended ridge near San Terenzo, also in Tuscany in April of 1945. They both experienced racism in the armed forces during WWII and recount that as well as the incidents that earned them the Medal of Honor many years later. Adapted and performed by stage and film actor, Stephen Lang, you will hear three gripping stories of valor all portrayed by one of America's finest actors, Stephen Lang.

Stephen_lang_beyond_glory_hs_small

"As starkly moving as taps at dusk" says the Washington Post about BEYOND GLORY, a powerful tribute to military valor written and performed by stage and screen star Stephen Lang (Colonel Quaritch in Avatar). In BEYOND GLORY, Part 2 he portrays three more recipients of the MEDAL OF HONOR recounting in their own words the incident that earned them the United States' highest military honor for valor beyond the call of duty. 

The first short of BEYOND GLORY, Part 2 is JOHN WILLIAM FINN. Chief Petty Officer Finn was stationed at Naval Base Kaneohe Bay on the morning of Sunday, December 7, 1941, when Pearl Harbor was attacked by the Japanese. He manned a machine gun from an exposed position for the duration of the attack. This is John Finn's own account of that morning adapted by Stephen Lang who also performs the role of John William Finn. The second short play is VERNON BAKER AND DANIEL INOUYE. First Lieutenant Vernon Baker received the Medal of Honor for his actions during World War II, April 1945, near Viareggio, in Tuscany, Italy and Captain Daniel Inouye (who later became the long-serving US Senator from Hawaii) was grievously wounded while leading an assault on a heavily-defended ridge near San Terenzo, also in Tuscany in April of 1945. They both experienced racism in the armed forces during WWII and recount that as well as the incidents that earned them the Medal of Honor many years later. Adapted and performed by stage and film actor, Stephen Lang, you will hear three gripping stories of valor all portrayed by one of America's finest actors, Stephen Lang.

"One of the richest, most complex pieces of acting I've seen in my theater going life." The Wall Street Journal
 
Each segment is followed by conversation between Mr. Lang and Playing on Air's producer and host, Claudia Catania. You can hear more short plays about Medal of Honor recipients in BEYOND GLORY adapted and performed by Stephen Lang. BEYOND GLORY and BEYOND GLORY, Part 2 can stand alone or be aired together.

Beyond Glory Part 1 can be found here.

Norman Corwin, Writer-Director From Radio's Golden Age

From Katy Sewall | 49:32

Norman Corwin is widely acclaimed as one of the greatest writer–director–producer's of radio's Golden Age. Radio educator, Tony Palermo, says that not knowing Corwin's work is like never having heard of Shakespeare.

In this special, get to know Corwin's work, and learn how his writing shaped the way citizens of the United States felt about World War II.
Producer Katy Sewall sat down with Norman Corwin right after his 100th birthday and brings you this sound-rich exploration.

100_1492_small

Radio's Golden Age is over, but many names from that era are still famous today. You probably know Jack Benny and Orson Wells, but are you familiar with Norman Corwin? 

Norman Corwin is widely acclaimed as one of the greatest writer–director–producer's of radio's Golden Age.  Radio educator Tony Palermo says that not knowing Corwin's work is like never having heard of Shakespeare. 

In this special, get to know Corwin's work, and how his writing shaped the way citizens of the United States felt about World War II. Producer Katy Sewall sat down with Norman Corwin right after his 100th birthday.

Memorial Day 2011 - The American Civil War 11-21

From All Classical Public Media | Part of the The Score with Edmund Stone series | 59:00

This week on The Score with Edmund Stone, The American Civil War.

Edmund_for_the_score_ad_8-2012_small This week on The Score with Edmund Stone, The American Civil War. The heartbreak and valor of the American Civil War has inspired filmmakers and film composers since the earliest days of cinema. Join us for music from films about the War Between the States, including Cold Mountain and Glory on the next edition of The Score.

Peace Talks Radio: Taken Too Soon-The Cost of War (A Memorial)[59:00/54:00/29:00 or Modules]

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:47

Nearly 40 public radio producers from around the world lend their voices to a roll call of just some of the names of casualties from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, including coalition soldiers, Iraqi and Afghan civilians, contractors and journalists.

Worldflag3small_small Nearly 40 public radio producers from around the world lend their voices to a roll call of just some of the names of casualties from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan in a program being made available to U.S. public radio stations for use on or around Memorial Day. TAKEN TOO SOON: THE COST OF WAR is produced by Paul Ingles, of the non-profit media organization called Good Radio Shows, Inc. The program features some of the names and circumstances of the deaths of coalition forces, Iraqi and Afghan civilians, contractors and journalists killed since the fighting began in Afghanistan in October of 2001. "I don't think there's been a program like this that has acknowledged the loss of life among civilians, contractors and journalists along side of military casualties," says Ingles. "I just felt it was important that people marking Memorial Day in the U.S. take a moment to contemplate a roll call that goes beyond just our own country's loss. All most Americans have heard is that 15, 8, 30 Iraqis died in a certain incident on a given day. These people had names and families just like the men and women of our armed forces. It seems appropriate to me to read some of their names." The hour long program will contain about 135 names meant to represent the various casualty constituencies. A soldier from each state in the U.S. is included. Nearly 40 public radio producers and reporters from around the world volunteered their time to voice part of the list. Ingles used Defense Department information for the names of coalition casualties. Civilian, contractor and journalist names were drawn from press reports and websites devoted to tracking those deaths. This program is offered in 59:00, 54:00 (newscast ready) and 29:00 lengths. 59 + 54 min shows have two one-minute breaks. Also 8 5-minute modules of the roll call are offered to stations wanting to spread them throughtout the day. ADVISORY: Though not explicit, the program does include some details of the cause of death of those listed. Some stations might find such an advisory appropriate depending on what time of day the program is broadcast.

Picking Up the Pieces: Veterans Special

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:50

How family and faith are healing veterans home from war.

Shurvonmay_small This program visits with five families of veterans wounded by IEDs in Iraq and Afghanistan. The families are coping with the aftermath of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and post traumatic stress (PTSD). This special breaks new ground by focusing on the parents, especially mothers, who have given up everything -- their jobs, retirement savings, and plans for the future - to step in and care for their sons. This issue has not gotten the attention is deserves. In the coming years, as additional tens of thousands of injured veterans return home, overburdened parents will respond with love and support, but the rest of us need to become aware of this urgent problem and help our government develop comprehensive solutions. The radio special is part of a first ever effort by AARP, drawing together print, video, audio, and the Web, and providing extensive listings of resources that affected families can use, and places where others can offer help. Every part of this project will be accessible through a central URL: aarp.org/iraqvets (live on May 21st) Our radio special was written and produced by AARP's Steve Mencher, with Barry Yeoman, who traveled around the United States and did the reporting for the special and for an investigative piece in AARP The Magazine. You may remember Barry from our very successful Hurricane Katrina special last fall. Music by Terence Blanchard, Nine Inch Nails, Aaron Parks, and Kimo Williams.

MASH 1969 - Visions of War, Dreams of Peace

From Center for Emerging Media | Part of the Shared Weight series | 59:00

Profiles of poet George Evans, a veteran medic, and Lynda Van Devanter, whose experiences as Vietnam nurse inspired China Beach. Warning: Graphic Depictions of Medical Operations.

Georgeevans_small Profiles of Vietnam Veteran medic and poet George Evans, who beat a court martial, and veteran nurse Lynda Van Devanter, whose controversial writings inspired the television series "China Beach." Includes interviews with George from his trip with Marc Steiner and two other Veterans, who travelled to Vietnam on the occasion of the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of Saigon. He talks of his passive resistance to orders as a protest to the war, and his court martial trial, which he won. Also included is a recording of Lynda Van Devanter, whose book Home Before Morning:The Story of an Army Nurse in Vietnam, first published in 1983, was the inspiration for the television series "China Beach." Lynda passed away in 2002, and this is the only known recording of her describing her experiences and reading passages from her work. Lynda's writings were first created to deal with her post traumatic stress syndrome, and once published, created controversy among the nurses who served, who either cheered her candidness, or loathed her for painting a negative picture of the nurses and doctors who served. She was also an advocate and founding executive director of the Women's Project of the Vietnam Veterans of America from 1979 to 1984, testifying before Congress and other government agencies on behalf of the 7,465 women Vietnam veterans. To quote author Wayne Karlin, who knew Lynda: "Many of us loved her. Many others hated her. But they didn?t matter. She was a truth-teller and those who hated her were threatened by the truth she had to tell." WARNING: Please be advised the the following program has graphic depictions of the wounded and their medical treatment, and language that some may find objectionable.

RN Documentary: The Best of Times, the Worst of Times - War and Memory

From Radio Netherlands Worldwide | Part of the RN Documentaries series | 29:28

How war influences identity and memory in both the individual and the national sense.

Ooster180_small In Europe the signs of remembrance of war is everywhere. Fields in France Belgium and the Netherlands are still turning up traces of the untold numbers of war dead. In this program, Prof Jay Winter from Yale University and 3 war veterans talk of how war has shaped individual and national identity and how different wars are remembered in the collective memory.

Mothers and Sons

From Marjorie Van Halteren | 26:44

a sonic memorial to the healing power of art

Suselogo_small Mothers and Sons is a double portrait of the German sculptor Kathe Kollwitz (1867-1945), who created "The Grieving Parents," a moving memorial to her son who died in WWI, and the contemporary German-Americansculptor Suse Lowenstein , who created an equally monumental work to honor her son, a victim in the 1988 Lockerbie disaster. Both women describe how their work (18 years for Kathe, 14 years for Suse), became a path through their grief, bearing witness to the transforming power of art and creation. Mothers and Sons is a collaboration between Helen Engelhardt, a storyteller and performer, and Marjorie Van Halteren, sound artist. Kathe's diaries are performed by Helen, with Marjorie composing sound and music. Sound recorded on location on Long Island and in Southern Belgium. Mothers and Sons is the third program in a trilogy exploring the themes of war, loss, memory, and regeneration. The two other half hours, "Unquiet Graves," and "Yesterday and Forever, are also available.

The 20th Anniversary of the Lockerbie disaster is December 21, 2008.

Vietnam Blues

From Tina Antolini | 28:31

Vince Gabriel is a Vietnam veteran who's written an album of songs chronicling his experience of the war. He takes listeners back to 1968, to the jungle of Vietnam.

Default-piece-image-2 Vince Gabriel is a Maine-based blues musician who's written an album of songs chronicling his experience in the Vietnam war. In the documentary, Vince takes listeners chronologically through his time in Vietnam, with his music leading us into stories about getting drafted, arriving in the jungle, what combat was like, the loss of his closest friend, the relief of finally returning home and his reflections on the legacy of Vietnam today. While news reports about the war in Iraq tend to focus on numbers and strategy, Vince's stories give listeners an almost visceral sense of what it's like for those on the front lines. Though it is an account of a war that took place years ago, the current situation in Iraq make Vince's observations feel disturbingly immediate and poignant. This piece aired nationally on the documentary program "Soundprint" in late January 2005.

Fields of Remembrance

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 28:59

To honor the young men who sacrificed their lives in the D-Day invasion, Brigadier General Casey Brower takes young cadets on tours of the American cemeteries in France.

Cemetery_military_small When President Ronald Reagan traveled to Normandy in 1984 to mark the 40th anniversary of the D-Day invasion, a young army officer, Casey Brower, was with him and was deeply moved. Casey is now Brigadier General Casey Brower and takes cadets from Virginia Military Institute on tours of the American cemeteries for the fallen soldiers in France. The cadets are of the same age as many of the young men who made the sacrifice in the D-Day assault. Also featured: The Great Kanto Earthquake struck Japan in 1923 and killed more than 100,000 people.  In the chaos after the disaster rumors circulated that led hysterical Japanese vigilantes to lynch thousands of Korean and Chinese guest workers. Eric Han explores how modern Japan’s reaction to the recent earthquake reflects how that nation has changed in the intervening decades.

The War Comes Home: Washington's Battle Against America’s Veterans

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

As we mark the 6th anniversary of the US invasion of Iraq, reporter Aaron Glantz takes us inside the war as it comes home to our communities. We focus on the role educational institutions can play in helping former soldiers adjust to civilian life.

Episode_pic_for__11-09_small Nearly two million Americans have fought in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.  On this edition, reporter Aaron Glantz takes us inside the war as it comes home to our communities, with a focus on the special role our educational institutions can play in helping former soldiers adjust to civilian life.

Kathleen's Machine: World War II At Home

From Susan Barrett Price | Part of the Family History: The Stars Who Guide Us series | 06:00

Short documentary collage of voices recorded in St. Louis during World War II on a Wilcox-Gay Recordio. The Greatest Generation carries on, as remembered and recorded by my mother Kathleen Barrett Price.

Kathleennowandthen-sq250px_small Kathleen Barrett Price tells her story of recording voices during the 1940s. In figuring out how to use a Wilcox-Gay Recordio home disk recorder, Kathleen not only managed to preserve her youthful memories, but also captured the vibe of a special time and place.

World War II was raging; her brother had been killed. But, doing what the Irish do best, the family found solace in song and laughter. In the basement space beneath the family's grocery store and tavern in north St Louis, they hosted parties. Over the course of three years, Kathleen and her sister Mary Hohmann set up the machine to capture the warmth and hilarity of these gatherings. The results form the crowded "memoryscape" that accompanies her reflections here.

Veteran Repays Near-Half-Century Debt

From Rebecca Sheir | 05:40

How do you thank someone who saves you from tragedy? This Vietnam veteran knows.

Img_5032-edit_small In these economic times, it’s hard to think of “debt” as anything other than financial. But there’s another kind of debt we can take on and repay: one of gratitude.

Rebecca Sheir introduces us to a Vietnam veteran who’s been repaying that very debt... for nearly half a century.

“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” repeal a victory for local servicewomen

From KALW | 06:43

It’s been less than a year since “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” was repealed, and soon, gays and lesbians can come out – or go in – to the military without fear of losing their careers.

For many, the battle to allow gay and lesbian soldiers to serve openly was the end of a long journey, and a momentous victory for civil rights. Reporter Priscilla Yuki Wilson has more.

Picture_1_small It’s been less than a year since “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” was repealed, and soon, gays and lesbians can come out – or go in – to the military without fear of losing their careers. For many, the battle to allow gay and lesbian soldiers to serve openly was the end of a long journey, and a momentous victory for civil rights. Reporter Priscilla Yuki Wilson has more.

Veteran Voices: military mom shares her story of separation and service

From KALW | 05:37

The U.S. military is changing. “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” has been repealed, more women are serving, and the structure of military families is changing. More than 700,000 U.S. children now have a parent who is deployed in the military.

Last year, Oakland resident Alexis Hutchinson made headlines when she refused to go to Afghanistan, saying she couldn’t find adequate childcare for her then-10-month-old child. She received an “other than honorable” discharge from the military.

The Department of Defense estimates that there are more than 70,000 single parents on active duty. That represents only about 5% of service members, but the consequences of their deployment are complicated. Vilmarys Pichardo has more.

Picture_3_small The U.S. military is changing. “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” has been repealed, more women are serving, and the structure of military families is changing. More than 700,000 U.S. children now have a parent who is deployed in the military. Last year, Oakland resident Alexis Hutchinson made headlines when she refused to go to Afghanistan, saying she couldn’t find adequate childcare for her then-10-month-old child. She received an “other than honorable” discharge from the military. The Department of Defense estimates that there are more than 70,000 single parents on active duty. That represents only about 5% of service members, but the consequences of their deployment are complicated. Vilmarys Pichardo has more.

What can be done to support military families?

From KALW | 06:39

Military families like Tracy Crawford’s are becoming more and more common, though the challenges they face remain. That’s being acknowledged by many people in our nation’s capitol, including First Lady Michelle Obama. In fact, it was the subject of her speech to the U.S. Military Academy’s Class of 2011 just a few days ago:

FIRST LADY MICHELLE OBAMA: I want to talk about what family can and will mean for you as leaders of our Army and of our nation … Because our force is a force of families. And that’s become more clear even in just a generation. During Vietnam, most of our troops were young, single men, and most of those were married had spouses who stayed at home. But today more than half of our service members are married. Forty percent have two or more kids, and most military spouses are employed outside of the home. That’s what today’s military families look like.

Obama’s Westpoint graduation speech follows last month’s announcement of the "Joining Forces" initiative, which calls on all Americans "to mobilize, take action and make a real commitment to supporting our military families.” That initiative is being spearheaded by the First Lady as well as the Vice President’s wife, Jill Biden. But help is also coming from the Department of Defense. To learn more about what the military is doing to support its families, KALW’s Holly Kernan called the DOD’s Office of Family Policy/Children & Youth and spoke with Director Barbara Thompson.

Picture_2_small Military families like Tracy Crawford’s are becoming more and more common, though the challenges they face remain. That’s being acknowledged by many people in our nation’s capitol, including First Lady Michelle Obama. In fact, it was the subject of her speech to the U.S. Military Academy’s Class of 2011 just a few days ago: FIRST LADY MICHELLE OBAMA: I want to talk about what family can and will mean for you as leaders of our Army and of our nation … Because our force is a force of families. And that’s become more clear even in just a generation. During Vietnam, most of our troops were young, single men, and most of those were married had spouses who stayed at home. But today more than half of our service members are married. Forty percent have two or more kids, and most military spouses are employed outside of the home. That’s what today’s military families look like. Obama’s Westpoint graduation speech follows last month’s announcement of the "Joining Forces" initiative, which calls on all Americans "to mobilize, take action and make a real commitment to supporting our military families.” That initiative is being spearheaded by the First Lady as well as the Vice President’s wife, Jill Biden. But help is also coming from the Department of Defense. To learn more about what the military is doing to support its families, KALW’s Holly Kernan called the DOD’s Office of Family Policy/Children & Youth and spoke with Director Barbara Thompson.

Retiring with Dahlias

From Liz Jones | 08:26

A WW2 vet reflects on his time as a marine and his passion for growing dahlias.

Dahlia_small Vic Oder was a rifle coach with the U.S. Marines for 12 years. He served during World War II and retired from the military in 1946. Now 82-years-old, he spends most of his time in the garden, growing thousands of dahlias every year. He talked to producer Liz Jones about his flowers and his service during the war.

He Always Gets the Last Word In

From Dan Gordon | 05:31

In 1919 his grandfather founded Maine Memorial Company in South Portland and the business has been in the family ever since. Paul used to be a banker, and both he and his father never had any desire for him to take over the business. But eventually Paul decided he needed a change and left the banking world behind to pick up his tools and begin carving. Today he sees himself as an artist, transforming people’s memories of their loved ones into portraits on stone.

Winter_tombstone_stock_13_by_malleni_stock-d33zjz6_small In 1919 his grandfather founded Maine Memorial Company in South Portland and the business has been in the family ever since. Paul used to be a banker, and both he and his father never had any desire for him to take over the business. But eventually Paul decided he needed a change and left the banking world behind to pick up his tools and begin carving. Today he sees himself as an artist, transforming people’s memories of their loved ones into portraits on stone.

Amanda Comes Home

From Western Folklife Center Media | 05:29

Mike Beck discusses his song, "Amanda Comes Home."

Default-piece-image-2 Mike Beck talks about getting to know a young soldier as she was preparing for her mission in Iraq, and how this experience has put a face on the war for him

Training with the Wyoming National Guard

From Addie Goss | 04:48

How soldiers prepare for deployment...at home and at training.

0218091216a_small

A thousand members of the Wyoming Army National Guard leave in mid-April for Fort Hood, Texas, and soon after for Kuwait and Iraq.  There’s a lot to do before they go: everything from drafting a will to finding people to care for their children, their aging parents, or their pets.  There’s also more training to do.  Here, we take a spin in a Humvee, clear a room of bad guys, and hear from soldiers about how they're preparing to leave.

Why West Point's 2015 Cadet First Captain Now Sees Memorial Day In a New Way

From Syracuse University Broadcast Journalism | 01:39

The United States Military Academy's Cadet First Captain Austin Welch shares how the loss of a dear friend changed not only his perspective on Memorial Day but also on his future career in the military.

Austinwelch_1_small The United States Military Academy's Cadet First Captain Austin Welch shares how the loss of a dear friend changed not only his perspective on Memorial Day but also on his future career in the military.