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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

236: Weighed Down, 6/22/2018

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 50:29

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small Sometimes it feels like the world is conspiring to make us pack on the pounds — we sit at desks all day, grab fast food on the run, and spend our evenings Netflixing on the couch. America is heavier than it’s ever been. In 2017, the CDC found that 40 percent of Americans deal with obesity, and health problems related to weight gain are on the rise. Throughout the hour — the ways excess weight affects our health, our wallets and our lives. On this episode of The Pulse, we hear about a growing trend to tax sugary drinks. We ask healthcare professionals why losing weight is so hard, and check out a program that uses food as medicine.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2018-06-17 Winners and Losers

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:59

Cwclub_c1_winlose_38_preview_small Host: Greg Dalton

Guests:
Solomon Hsiang, Chancellor's Associate Professor of Public Policy, UC Berkeley
Katherine Mach, Senior Research Scientist, Stanford University

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on May 30, 2018.

Do you live somewhere that might actually benefit from climate change? Rising temperatures and seas will produce losers and winners. Some parts of the world will see more moderate weather and economic gains, while others are already seeing sagging property prices and economic losses. But higher temperatures are more than just an economic issue.

“Many people think oh it’s just the temperature, but actually temperature affects everything,”
says Solomon Hsiang, Chancellor's Associate Professor of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. He co-authored a 2017 paper in the journal Science that outlines the impacts of a warmer world on human health and migration, violent crime, food production and wealth distribution.

“This idea that the temperature affects our judgment and our ability and willingness to engage in violence, that’s something that we studied a lot in our research,” says, Hsiang adding that one of the most robust statistical regularities they’ve found is that “hot days, hot weeks, hot months are associated with higher rates of violent crime, all types of crime: sexual assault, regular assault, murder.”

Hot days are also associated with reduced incomes. Hsiang and his colleagues have followed actual U.S. counties over time and found that if the diurnal average is above 85 Fahrenheit, “people earn roughly $20 less at the end of the year... The analogy is every time it’s a hot day I take 20 bucks and I just throw it away.”

So who does come out ahead? Hsiang explains that warmer temperatures could be beneficial to those who suffer illness due to extreme cold. “We do spend a lot of resources trying to cope with the cold,” he notes, “and so there are many parts of the world where if you get a little bit warmer, or if you get a little bit more rainfall, a little less rainfall you actually can take those resources that you were spending on, you know, shoveling your driveway or paying someone to plow it.  And you can invest those in something much more productive.”

But would any of these benefits inevitably offset by the social costs? “Risk in a changing climate is not just about the climate – that human side of the picture is unbelievably important,” says Katherine Mach, a Senior Research Scientist at Stanford University.  “The huge inequities among countries of the world and the way that impacts that are happening in terms of impacts for food security or water insecurity or extremes, will mean different things when you're in a low income country context without the state support capacity there on the ground or the level of economic development to keep things chugging ahead.”

Mach sees a similar potential for disparate outcomes in food production. “There have been some interesting ways where we already see early winners, or at least people with good foresight in terms of wine moving North,” she notes, but wonders whether “we [will] create winners and losers in terms of the big companies able to shift their supply chains readily at the same time that people on the ground in small communities in Africa or small rural communities in the Southeast in the U.S. for example, can't as readily make those types of rather dramatic fast adjustments.”

Mach does see winners emerging in the responses of many communities to temperature rise. “All of these risks are tied to everything we care about,” she argues. “Oftentimes there were real win-win entry points where yes it's about developing and making people well off economically. Yes, it's about directing our attention to the climate dimension of that and we get wins across them in ways that our investments can mean more in total.”

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Mimeographs and Dittos (#1502)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

Carrotstick_small Is there a word or phrase that's particular to your hometown? The editors of the Oxford English Dictionary would like to hear about it. In Cincinnati, for example, three-way refers to a kind of style of serving chili. You can contribute your examples on the OED's site, or talk about it on Twitter using the hashtag #wordswhereyouare.

If you're of a certain age, you may remember the smell of pages from ditto machines. Before those fragrant pages, there were sheets printed by mimeographs. Both the words ditto and mimeograph were originally brand names. Xerox machines later came along, a brand name deriving from the Greek word xeros, or dry, a reference to the printing process. From the same Greek root comes xeroscaping, which is landscaping that requries little or no water. The word ditto goes back to an Italian word that means said, while mimeograph comes from Greek words that mean "to write the same." Other terms for similar types of printing devices are formograph, mimeoscope, spirit duplicator, hectograph, roneograph, and pyrograph.

When trying to make themselves understood, kids cab be wonderfully creative with language. A couple of examples sent in by listeners: lasterday, referring to any time in the past, and spicy, describing bath water that's too hot.

Colleen from Fairbanks, Alaska, is pondering the word hangry, a portmanteau of hungry and angry, and applied to someone who's irritable as the result of hunger. Although hangry has been around sincet at least the 1950s, it enjoyed a boost in popularity in the 1990s. In 2018, the Oxford English Dictionary added an entry for this useful adjective.

Quiz Guy John Chaneski's quiz involves words and phrases that the late writer Tom Wolfe helped popularize. For example, what phrase is associated with Wolfe's 1979 book with a title that might be paraphrased as Just What Is Needed?

Why does English derive words for some colors, such as blue and orange, from French, but not words for other colors, such as black and white? A fantastic resource about the history of colors is Kassia St. Clair's The Secret Lives of Color.

On Twitter, @mollybackes notes that in Wisconsin, a Tyme machine dispenses cash, not time travel.

Nancy in Panama City Beach, Florida, remembers that as a girl, whenever she asked why her mother was looking at her, her mother would respond, Well, can't the cat look at the queen? This phrase goes all the way back to the mid-16th century. A 1652 book of proverbs includes the version What, a cat may look on a king, you know. Another version goes, a cat is free to contemplate a monarch.

To frogmarch someone means to hustle them out of a place, usually by grabbing their collar and pinning their arms behind. Originally, this verb referred to police carrying an unruly person out of a building face down with a different person grasping each limb.

Steve in Dennis, Massachusetts, remembers a cartoon that showed a boy trying to persuade a donkey to pull a cart by holding out a carrot suspended from a stick. Is that the origin of the expression carrot and stick? The original metaphor involved the idea of motivating an animal with intermittent rewards and punishment -- that is, proffering a carrot or threatening with a stick.

In his collection of essays, A Temple of Texts, writer William Gass observed: The true alchemists do not change lead into gold; they change the world into words."

Boustrophedonic writing goes from right to left, then left to right, then right to left again. This term derives from Greek word bous, meaning "ox," also found in bucolic and bulimia (literally, ox hunger) and strophe, meaning turn, like the downward turn that is a catastrophe. The adjectival form is boustrophedonic.

Mark from Los Angeles, California, is curious about the slang term gank, meaning to steal.

Monte from San Antonio, Texas, responded to our query about what to call people who hold up traffic in turn lanes. Monte and his fellow truck drivers refer to such motorists as steering-wheel holders.

Eric in Fairbanks, Alaska, notes the use of the phrase I'm just saying as a way to soften one's comment or avoid responsibility for an observation. Linguists, who've been studying this phrase since the early 2000s, call such a statement a rhetorical backoff. Other examples are present company excluded, no offense, not to be critical, no offense or the even more elaborate I'm not saying, I'm just saying.

Julie in Nantucket, Massachussetts, was tickled when her father used the expression weak as hen turd tea. More commonly called chicken poop tea, or chicken poo tea, or in Australia chook pop tea, hen turd tea is a mixture of poultry manure steeped in water that some believe is helpful to spread over garden soil.
 …

This episode is hosted by Martha Barnette and Grant Barrett, and produced by Stefanie Levine.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Mx101 Ep14: Boogie Woogie, 6/21/2018

From KUNC & The Colorado Sound | Part of the Music 101 series | 57:00

Music_101_recent_small The Boogie Woogie rhythm is not only distinctive and fun, it is the building beat of rock and roll. This week Music 101 explores Boogie Woogie. Tune in to hear the earliest musicians to adopt it, including Hersel Thomas, to those who popularized it, like Albert Ammons, to the hugely popular swing movement, up to the foundations of the rock and roll sound.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR080: OHR Presents: Leyla McCalla, 6/25/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Leyla_mccalla_prx_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, New York born Haitian-American classical & folk music sensation and former Carolina Chocolate Drops member Leyla McCalla recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Leyla.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original & hammered dulcimer legend Jay Round performing a medley of traditional Irish tunes.  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an introduction to Ozark geology, featuring an interview with Arkansas Geological Survey supervisor Angela Chandler.

Leyla McCalla is a Haitian-American living in New Orleans, who sings in French, Haitian Creole and English, and plays cello, tenor banjo and guitar. Deeply influenced by traditional Creole, Cajun and Haitian music, as well as by American jazz and folk, her music is at once earthy, elegant, soulful and witty — it vibrates with three centuries of history, yet also feels strikingly fresh, distinctive and contemporary.  Violist Free Feral - Guitarist, banjoist, and triangle Daniel Tremblay

Leyla’s debut album, Vari-Colored Songs: A Tribute to Langston Hughes, was named 2013’s Album of the Year by the London Sunday Times and Songlines magazine, and received additional raves from a number of other publications, including the New York Times, Boston Globe and Offbeat, for its haunting mixture of music and message.  - https://leylamccalla.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original & hammered dulcimer legend Jay Round performing a medley of traditional Irish tunes, from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode gives us an introduction to Ozark geology, featuring an interview with Arkansas Geological Survey supervisor Angela Chandler.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 18-25: Daylily Tempura, Cattail Pollen Pancakes And A Cheesemonger’s Back-Story, 6/22/2018

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 29:01

Ee_logo_small

“They called me the chicken lady [laughs]. I was cake decorator, I learned how to bake bread, and then I led the deli. I led the bakery and then I led all of it.”  

Maria Brummet held many positions at Kroger before she landed as head of the cheese shop at Kroger’s flagship store on Bloomington’s East side. We’ll hear more from her and all of details she needs to memorize about different types of cheeses from around the world. 

We’ve got a story about a horseradish festival from Harvest Public Media and Chef Daniel Orr takes us on another walk on the wild side. This time it’s daylilies and Cattails.


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

180621: Folk Alley Weekly good through June 28, 6/22/2018

From WKSU | Part of the Folk Alley Weekly series | 01:57:59

Folk_alley_small This week on Folk Alley, in hour one we'll premiere the new single from The Stray Birds, who have just annouced their forthcoming album, 'Let It Pass,' due out in early September; more new music from Kittel & Co, Lindsay Lou, Gretchen Peters, and set from Toronto's Slocan Ramblers' latest album, 'Queen City Jubilee'; we'll salute a favorite summer pastime with some fishin' songs by John Prine, Taj Mahal, and Frank Solivan; plus favorites from The Barr Brothers, I'm With Her (Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz and Aoife O'Donovan), and many more.

In hour two, new music from Old Crow Medicine Show, Ben Harper and Charlie Musselwhite, Vivian Leva, and Mipso; we'll hear the latest by Eliza Gilkyson performing a folk classic with the late Jimmy LaFave, from her new album, 'Secularia'; also one from Twisted Pine's new EP of cover songs, 'Dreams'; all this, plus more favorites from Merle Travis, Punch Brothers, Pete Seeger, and Bill Morrissey.

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio (Series)

Produced by Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

218: Shrimp, Sprite and Pig Head: The Mysteries and Delights of True Filipino Cuisine, 6/21/2018

From Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio | Part of the Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio series | 53:57

Msl_radio_logo_cobrand_prx_small Water fights (and eating well) in Myanmar; cheesier pasta; and Adam Gopnik on wine and philosophy.

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

426: Hunting the Ghost Fleet, 6/30/2018

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | :00

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With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Blending Families (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 28:53

18720783216_217f83a023_z-1004x618_small Blending Families (June 23, 2018)  
More than a hundred years ago, a small group of Russian Mennonites went looking for Christ in Central Asia. They didn't find him, but they did find a home among Muslims in Uzbekistan. Sofia Samatar tells their history alongside her own story of growing up the daughter of a Somali Muslim and an American Mennonite. And: Before a new baby comes, expectant moms and dads often read books about parenting their child. But after becoming a dad later in life, Christopher Phillips realized that parenting is more about the raising of the parent. Turns out, there's a word for that: childing.

Are We Alone?

From Philosophy Talk | 53:59

If there is intelligent life beyond Earth, how would that change life ON Earth?

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News that life might exist or have existed on Mars or somewhere else in our universe excites many. But should we really be happy to hear that news? What are the philosophical implications of the possibility of extraterrestrial life? If life can blossom in our own cosmic backyard, then that means that the universe is most likely saturated with life forms. And if that’s the case, why haven’t we found any evidence of other civilizations? Is it because all civilizations are prone to suicidal destruction at a certain point in their development? If so, how might we avoid this fate? The Philosophers search for life with Paul Davies from Arizona State University, author of The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Kathryn Sullivan and More at the International Space Development Conference

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

2018_isdc_kathryn_sullivan_space_pioneer_award-small_small Freeman Dyson wasn’t the only space star at the ISDC.  Mat talks with former astronaut and NOAA Administrator Kathryn Sullivan and leaders of the Cassini mission.  Planetary Society Director of Space Policy Casey Dreier has the latest budget info from Washington and tells us about Space Policy Directive-3. Bruce and Mat have picked the name for the supermassive black hole that lurks at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. 

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

Walk_to_walk_small

Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 06/22/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Biene1_small Living Planet: Insects and us - On this week’s show: Most people think of insects as pests to get rid of — but our survival may be intimately tied to them. The problem is: Insects are in decline. Find out how the Berlin Philharmonic is drawing attention to the issue, why insects don't live at the seaside, and what makes bugs so important in the first place.

Tara Austin

From KUMD | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
KUMD

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 180628 11PM: ClassicalWorks (Episode 170), 6/28/2018 11:00 PM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 58:56

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 170)